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Who are the Hobby's Historically Most Influential People?


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  #41  
Old 08-18-2013, 08:57 PM
John Tysse Jr. John Tysse Jr. is offline
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Default Re: Who are the Hobby's Historically Most Influential People?

In My Opinion a Man who did as much as anyone to help this hobby is Harold Ottaway, Wichita, Kansas. He built Steam Park Locomotives along with his brother Herb and his Father in the early years of the Hobby. At one time he and Herb had 29 Steam engines and most in working order The had a pretty complete set of Case engines including a 110 displayed and running in the 1953 Show in Wichita one of the first 110's to be seen at a public show. He helped many people find parts they were needing and told them where they might buy a engine or part they were looking for, Harold kept a eye out and lots of notes when he travled proweling junk yards and ect. He amassed a large collection of Tractors, Stationarys and Literature and always was willing to share information with others. Also he was a Man of his word, a Quiet Man and a Gentleman in every sense of the word. John Tysse Jr
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  #42  
Old 08-18-2013, 09:12 PM
gleaner gleaner is offline
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Default Re: Who are the Hobby's Historically Most Influential People?

I'll sure second what John Tysse said. Harold Ottaway was a true friend and was always willing to help anyone with parts and information. A real pioneer of our hobby and a real gentleman.
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  #43  
Old 08-19-2013, 12:00 AM
Tim Mathis Tim Mathis is offline
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Default Re: Who are the Hobby's Historically Most Influential People?

Rev. Elmer Ritzman, for putting out the "Iron Man Album" magazine thus providing a vehicle for capturing, preserving and sharing so many of the personal stories and so much photographic history of the hobby at the time the men who actually used our engines 'back in the day' were themselves fading into the pages of history.

I wonder how much history and how many engines that we enjoy today would have been lost forever, and how many of todays shows might have never even been started, if he hadn't done what he did at the time he did it.

Thanks, Elmer!
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  #44  
Old 08-19-2013, 02:26 PM
DBH DBH is offline
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Default Re: Who are the Hobby's Historically Most Influential People?

My old friend & mentor Art Kent from Athens IL.

Dave Huffman
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Old 08-19-2013, 03:06 PM
Mark L. Jordan Mark L. Jordan is offline
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Default Re: Who are the Hobby's Historically Most Influential People?

I have scanned this thread, and see many, many names and the contributions that they have given. Surely, the preservation of steam engines, the technology, and associated machinery is in many ways attributed to their endeavors.

I cannot put a name, or names on this list, because I don't know the names that should be included.

See, I'm talking about YOU.

That's right. YOU.

YOU are the most influential people in the "hobby". Although the title of this thread contains the word "historically", history is merely a place in time, and was the "now" of that era. What YOU do is just as important, or more important, than the contributions of all of your predecessors. Their work is for naught if future generations don't carry it on.

Carry the torch, influential folks.
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  #46  
Old 08-19-2013, 10:11 PM
Thomas Diehl Thomas Diehl is offline
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Default Re: Who are the Hobby's Historically Most Influential People?

With 45 years in the same hobby,(my how time flies when you are having fun) here goes: First for two I never got to meet but where greats to me. L.K.Woods, of Menden ,Utah . Over the years I have read and reread his story in Iron-man about how he got his 6hp Russell. There was Arthur Young of Kinzer,Pa. (I may have met him briefly when I went to Steam School at R&T back in 1982?not sure )who saved many engine from the WWII scrap drives by hiding them in the woods and convincing the authorities the rest where needed for spare parts to keep many of the saw mills engines going.
Now for my NW Pa gang I was blessed to have know and ran there engines: Morgan Hill of Linesville,Pa . who taught my brother and I how to babbit on the back of my brothers tail gate. C.A. Fisher of Stoneboro ,Pa. Mr and Mrs Malz from Andoverton,Ohio .(just across the Pa. Line)
Back home in my back yard (Ohio): Clyde Whitmore of Lodi who was the first to trust me with his boiler taps!!.John McDowell of Plainfield,Oh and his power eater.Reuben Kandel of Berlin.(a true Gentleman!!!) Elmer Wenger of Dalton,Ohio. Roy Calame of Burton City who took time to show and explain to a very young me my first replaced fire box from his 8 hp Russell. Francis Young of East Sparta who was my Russell go to guy.Glen Krofft of Mt. Perry,Ohio my favorite engine trucker from the 70-80,s.
Western Ohio. Art Hieland a Huber man from Ana ,Ohio who helped my brother and I get casting (in the 70,s)long before I met my friends at Cattail.My dear friend Lyle Hoffmaster of Bucyrus,Ohio who was a Reeves man, though we always talked about the C. Aultman Co. of Canton,Ohio. as we both had Canton Monitors.
Moving West:My old friend of 35 years Keith Mauzy of IN. Harold Stark of Indianapolis,IN who I wish I had met years ago( fun talking one machinist to other ,with me all ears ). My friend Chady Atterberry of Blackwell,OK who I went though a close miss of a tornado with while staying at his home before the Pawee show. Lyman Knapp also of Blackwell,OK.
In closing, a few who I think are helping make history and a better future for all of us in this Hobby; Ben and Emanuel King of Cattail Foundry ,Gordonville, Pa. ,Jonas Stutzman of Middlefield,Ohio. Jeff Lund of Mn. John Spalding of Henderson,TN and Dr.Robert Rhode of Springboro,OH.--------------------------TWD

ps. Have not mentioned some as others have already done so. Just hope I do not wake up at 3am and remember that I forgot one or more names!!!--------twd

Last edited by Thomas Diehl; 08-20-2013 at 07:44 AM.
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  #47  
Old 08-19-2013, 11:00 PM
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Default Re: Who are the Hobby's Historically Most Influential People?

Thomas Diehl,
I was just thinking about Chady when I came here myself. And how about Danny Roen? He was still operating the Anderson's 35hp Buffalo Pitts for real in their threshing ring until 1947, I think he said. Tom Stebritz was the son of a man who saved a whole passel of engines from the scrappers, and Tom was extremely savvy with steam. Since TWD deflated my Lyle Hoffmaster balloon, and did a fine job of it too, I might add; the moment I met Lyle, he was visiting with Amos Rixmann. There are so many names of solid steam men I knew. Austin Monk, Kenneth Kelley, George Hedtke, Jack Kulish, Clyde Corley, Jim Spevacek, Joe Richardson, and that list goes on. And I'm afraid I'll miss someone myself, Tom.

You are correct about Robert Rhode... he is one sharp individual around just about any steam engine and its history, even if he is just a kid. Don Bradley is sharper than a carpet tack with Case and Avery engines. And our own Colin Beamish is second to none with Case IDs and parts... And he really IS a kid. Of course people like Jack Beamish and Clyde Hall make pretty good teachers.

Thomas, I lit my first fire in a steam engine and ran it 59 years ago next month. Back then, my dad had well over a dozen good old steam men as friends who'd love to stop by and reminisce about the good old days, when they ran steam most every day all summer and some of them went nearly year around in a sawmill. I think they liked visiting with dad, but also liked that we still had steam engines. I have phenomenal memories of the tales those old boys could tell when running engines to butter their bread. Pop valves causing horses to run away, fires and lost equipment. Probably what sticks in my mind most is how nearly every one of them had their "correct - inspection pop valve" and another one 25 (or so) psi higher for when the inspector was out of sight. I'll never forget how those old time engineers would hold you at arms length, until you could prove yourself as "safe" to them. Many were DARN grumpy too, but they seemed to have their reasons. After you earned your way into their inner sphere, you were okay and good as gold to them, because they learned you were "alert and safe" around an engine.
Gary

PS, Thomas: Didn't L.K. Woods get his 6 hp Russell at a laundry in Harlowton, Montana? Or was that somebody elses 6 hp Russell? That was a long, long time ago. I must be thinking of another 6 hp Russell as L.K. Woods' Russell, Ol' Betsy was larger than a 6 hp.
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  #48  
Old 08-19-2013, 11:27 PM
Thomas Diehl Thomas Diehl is offline
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Default Re: Who are the Hobby's Historically Most Influential People?

20ReevesHighwheeler : Old Betsy is ,I think a 10hp Russell. Spent the past 40years trying to fig. out where LK,s 6 Russell went and who owned it now. Come to find out a few months back that no one purchased his 6. Went down the road a few miles to a museum and has never turned a wheel again. Kind of sad!!!I think you are correct about where his 6 came from. Article is still out in my shop somewhere. Would read it again and again when i needed motivation on our 6 hp Russell project!!! After finding LK,s 6hp Russell I now know of 6 plus ours.------------------------TWD

Last edited by Thomas Diehl; 08-20-2013 at 07:50 AM.
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  #49  
Old 08-20-2013, 07:42 AM
Thomas Diehl Thomas Diehl is offline
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Default Re: Who are the Hobby's Historically Most Influential People?

Add the late John Limmer of NW Ohio, and my friend John Schrock of Mi.----------TWD
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  #50  
Old 08-20-2013, 09:55 AM
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Default Re: Who are the Hobby's Historically Most Influential People?

Thomas,
Here's a handy picture I had of Betsy, courtesy of my friend Dean Alling. The more I think of it, I DO think his 6 hp Russell came from a laundry in Harlowton, MT. Yes it is sad that it sets motionless in a museum. And I'd second the motion about my good friend John Schrock as well. He's helped put a lot of "junk" back into operation again.
Gary
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  #51  
Old 08-21-2013, 04:15 PM
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Default Re: Who are the Hobby's Historically Most Influential People?

Not to insinuate that these fellas are old but I would have to add these names to the list, Frank Johnson, David Schramm and Dave Kemler. These guys have advised, restored, helped restore, machined, welded, pinstriped and made parts for more engines than anyone of us can imagine. Countless engines are running because of these folks. I personally am in their debt and always will be. I also have to throw in my Great Uncle Ralph Vincent that was one of the original members of the National Threshers. He was very dedicated to the preservation of the hobby. Having grown up and farmed outside Port Huron using Port Huron machinery, he was a dyed in the wool Port Huron man. All you had to do was Ask The User and he would tell you how well they served him.
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  #52  
Old 08-21-2013, 05:07 PM
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Default Re: Who are the Hobby's Historically Most Influential People?

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Originally Posted by Ask The User View Post
Not to insinuate that these fellas are old but I would have to add these names to the list, Frank Johnson, David Schramm and Dave Kemler. These guys have advised, restored, helped restore, machined, welded, pinstriped and made parts for more engines than anyone of us can imagine. Countless engines are running because of these folks.
I whole heartedly agree with the above. My 24 Port Huron wouldn't be in the fine shape without all of the above. They are 3 very talented and caring steam men.

While they are not "old," they are leaving a huge legacy for us and a high standard of operation and restoration.
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  #53  
Old 08-22-2013, 12:27 PM
Dwight S Dwight S is offline
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Default Re: Who are the Hobby's Historically Most Influential People?

I remember Joe Fahnestock who used to write "The Ironman of the Month" column for The Iron-men Album. He was always entertaining and highlighted influential people.
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  #54  
Old 08-22-2013, 12:36 PM
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Default Re: Who are the Hobby's Historically Most Influential People?

Like you and your brother!

Link to Iron Man of the Month May-June 1972:

http://steamtraction.farmcollector.c...#axzz2ciV1VASN

David

Last edited by David; 08-22-2013 at 12:54 PM.
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Old 08-22-2013, 12:59 PM
Ricky A. Ritchie Ricky A. Ritchie is offline
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Default Re: Who are the Hobby's Historically Most Influential People?

if there names have been mentioned I missed them, Sam Osborn, Billy hall, William "bill" waters, tom ackerman,
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Old 08-22-2013, 02:30 PM
Bill Thurman Bill Thurman is offline
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Default Re: Who are the Hobby's Historically Most Influential People?

My mother, Francis Thurman, she loaned me the money for my first steam engine when my dad said I was crazy and I would never get it to operate again. I still smile about the time when she yelled at my dad and told him " I told you he could do it" Thanks mom ! Also Wilbur Fleming who did have time to answer "stupid teenager" questions about steam engines and was my best freind even though he was over 60 years older then I was. We all have different Influential people in our lives, some had alot and helped 100's , some could only help a few, they are all the same in my book !
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Old 08-22-2013, 03:16 PM
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Default Re: Who are the Hobby's Historically Most Influential People?

At 92, Mr Injector-Harold Stark fits the category too!

How is Harold doing?
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Old 08-23-2013, 08:21 AM
Jim Conte Jim Conte is offline
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Default Re: Who are the Hobby's Historically Most Influential People?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas Diehl View Post
There was Arthur Young of Kinzer,Pa. (I may have met him briefly when I went to Steam School at R&T back in 1982?not sure )who saved many engine from the WWII scrap drives by hiding them in the woods and convincing the authorities the rest where needed for spare parts to keep many of the saw mills engines going.
From the History of Rough and Tumble by Marie Bongiovani:

" During World War II., when scrap drives and donations for the war effort were popular, some folks labelled Art Young "unpatriotic" and reported his rusting collection to the government. When federal officials visited Young to encourage him to contribute his relics for war production, "rather than getting mad, he took them for a walk."

While touring his property, Art Young described how parts of old engines were recycled for defense production. He also showed how machines that were classified as scrap were used to supply parts to keep wartime engines running. "During the war, you couldn´t buy new parts, and had to make do with what you had." C. Everett Young said.

Instead of pressuring Young, authorities awarded an honorary citation for his efforts in conservation and recycling old machinery to help the war effort. Many folks believe that by preserving machines which contributed to our American heritage, Arthur S. Young may have done far more for future generations than several tons of scrap metal might have contributed during WWII. "

http://www.roughandtumble.org/history

Tom, Art passed away in 1955. You probably met his son, C. Everett Young, who co-founded the R&T Steam School with me in 1988. Art was before my time. Everett was a good friend of mine, and passed away too soon, in 1991.

There are so many who helped preserve this aspect of The Industrial Revolution comes to the Farm, Woodlot, Construction Site...Many are nationally and internationally known, the ones who may only be known locally also contributed greatly, not only in the establishment of local groups, but in the upbringing and one-on-one training of us youngsters.
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Old 08-23-2013, 10:47 AM
FDChief FDChief is offline
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Default Re: Who are the Hobby's Historically Most Influential People?

My vote would be Don Wiley of Sparta Illinois (may he rest in peace). Don helped a lot of Delco Light collectors.
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Old 08-23-2013, 03:41 PM
Ed Bays Ed Bays is offline
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Default Re: Who are the Hobby's Historically Most Influential People?

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Tysse Jr. View Post
In My Opinion a Man who did as much as anyone to help this hobby is Harold Ottaway, Wichita, Kansas. He built Steam Park Locomotives along with his brother Herb and his Father in the early years of the Hobby...... Also he was a Man of his word, a Quiet Man and a Gentleman in every sense of the word. John Tysse Jr

Well said, by John and Gleaner. Here's an early photo of an Ottaway scale locomotive. This has long been a favorite in my photo collection.
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