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Generators & Motors General Discussion Antique Generators, Light Plants and Old Electric Motors: Questions and answers about restoring and showing old power generation systems.

Generators & Motors General Discussion

Old Century motor


I have a old Century electric motor #52140 rated at 1/2hp 60 cycle 104-208 volts 1750 rpm. This...

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  #1  
Old 06-16-2002, 11:36 AM
Joseph
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Default Old Century motor

I have a old Century electric motor #52140 rated at 1/2hp 60 cycle 104-208 volts 1750 rpm. This motor is about 3 or 4 time as big as todays 1/2 hp motors. Can anyone tell me the age or date this motor mas made. I tried to contact century over a week ago but i have not gotten an answer from them.

Joseph
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  #2  
Old 06-16-2002, 11:28 PM
Bill Garman
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Default Re: Old Century motor

My first guess is that you have a repulsion-start, induction-run motor. The large size would be due to the armature having repulsion windings that are shorted out to make the motor run more economicly as an induction motor after it has achieved running speed. Reverse this kind of motor by shifting the brush rack on the front end. (on motor, front is oposit end of shaft)
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  #3  
Old 06-17-2002, 12:54 PM
Patrick Traubert
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Default Re: Old Century motor

The 104V makes it in the 1905-1915 range.
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  #4  
Old 12-31-2003, 08:59 PM
randylay
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Default Re: Old Century motor

I also have an old shinko (century) induction motor. It is a 2 hp, 1750 rpm motor. The model number is 10AF37820 I believe. My trouble is that when coupled to my BIG and old Devilbiss air compressor, it will not start(it tries). It blows the breaker after about 2 seconds. Can I add a start kit(capacitor and relay)? or what can I do? By the way, this thing is huge. It takes 2 to carry it. Thanks very much for any help. Randy Lay
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Old 01-01-2004, 03:41 PM
Franz
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Default Re: Old Century motor

The logical place to start on your question is asking did this motor ever start and run this compressor?
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  #6  
Old 01-01-2004, 06:36 PM
Ed Radtke
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Default Re: Old Century motor

Check to see if the centrifugul start swith is closd when the motor is at rest, and that it has continuity thrugh the contacts. If not then the start circuit is not energizing and will pull locked rotor amps.
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  #7  
Old 01-01-2004, 08:24 PM
randylay
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Default Re: Old Century motor

No, this is a spare motor I have laying around. Just doesn't seem to be much satrting torque. Thanks, Randy
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  #8  
Old 01-01-2004, 08:36 PM
Kevin Beitz
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Default Re: Old Century motor

Maybe you could put a centrifugul clutch on the motor to give it a head start...
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  #9  
Old 01-01-2004, 10:33 PM
randylay
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Default Re: Old Century motor

Great idea Kevin. I hadn't even considered that. Everything I was considering seemed to be above the scope of my electrical knowledge. Now, would this be a Grainger(etc) item? Or are you meaning the type that you would put on a minibike? Either way I will now do some more research. Thanks again Kevin. Randy
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  #10  
Old 01-01-2004, 11:05 PM
Anthony W.
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Default Re: Old Century motor

Are you using an unloader valve on the compressor? If not, it will be very hard to start, regardless of the motor's condition.
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  #11  
Old 01-02-2004, 12:37 AM
randylay
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Default Re: Old Century motor

I believe that the compressor has an unloading valve, but I have also opened the tank valve upon startup, so there would be no back pressure. The compressor spins fairly freely by hand, so I assume that the motor is at fault. Or in other words that the motor(s) are just not able to get up to speed when the large flywheel is belted to the motor. I have tried a new Harbor Freight 3 hp "compressor duty" motor, but have the same problem w/it triping the breaker. I have considered that the wiring may be faulty, but this compressor worked until the cap and centrifugal switch went out. The old motor was a GE 3/4 hp, 1100 rpm dual volt running @120 volts. It is one of the large old types. I just wanted to replace it with the extra century 2 hp (also big and old, but free spinning and looks to be in good shape. My Grandfather purchased it at a govt surplus sale probably at least 40 yrs ago. I hope this info helps and again thanks very much for all your help. Randy
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  #12  
Old 01-02-2004, 11:02 AM
larry rusch
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Default Re: Old Century motor

A couple of things to consider: The old motor was 3/4 hp, this one is 2 hp check the nameplate current draw, you may not have enuf current capacity. Replace your breaker, sometimes they go bad and trip early, especially ones that have been tripped a lot. Does the motor run by itself? Maybe the motor needs work.
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  #13  
Old 01-02-2004, 02:03 PM
Anthony W.
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Default Re: Starting the Old Century motor

The starting current of the 2 hp motor will be considerably more than that of your former 3/4 hp motor. Are you using the same motor pulley as before? If so, the 1750 Rpm motor will draw more starting current than a comparable 1100 rpm motor, given that it is disadvantaged by around 50 percent higher compressor speed.
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  #14  
Old 01-02-2004, 08:46 PM
randylay
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Default Re: Starting the Old Century motor

Thanks for the info and advice. I guess my main question is, can I somehow bypass the centrifigal switch? Would this eventually burn up the start capacitor? I would like to keep using the old GE 3/4 hp motor, but can't find a replacement switch. Thanks again Randy
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  #15  
Old 01-02-2004, 09:37 PM
Brian Watson
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Default Re: Starting the Old Century motor

I would also guess you have a really old motor. I have a couple 1/4 hp Century motors that have tags on them that say "refrigeration motor" and dated 1914.
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  #16  
Old 01-03-2004, 02:53 AM
Franz
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Default Re: Starting the Old Century motor

The starting capacitor CANNOT remain in the circuit, nor can the start winding, because they will burn up and also prevent the motor from reaching full speed. I'd say you have 2 choices for a repair/retrofit, if the start switch isn't available from Greinger parts, you could replace it with a starting relay and operate the motor as if it were a hermetic refridgeration compressor. You could also substitute a pushbutton switch for the start switch if you wanted to start the compressor manually, and leave the motor running constant.
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  #17  
Old 01-03-2004, 01:30 PM
randylay
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Default Re: Starting the Old Century motor

Thanks Franz. That is exactly the kind of info I needed. I will try your suggestions Randy
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  #18  
Old 01-03-2004, 03:50 PM
Kevin Beitz
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Default Re: Starting the Old Century motor

Today they sell special electronic switches to replace the old switches in the old motors... Any motor repair shop should be able to get one for you... The centrifugal clutch I was talking about is made by Dodge corp. I'm sure other company's also make them... They are made only for electric motors and you need the right RPM. Boston sells them... This link might help...




Browning clutches
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  #19  
Old 01-03-2004, 06:03 PM
Franz
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Default Re: Starting the Old Century motor

Kevin, a lot of those "special electronic switches" are in refridgerators sitting beside the road awaiting their last ride to the junk yard. Given the nature of the old iron hobby, it isn't a bad place to find one.
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  #20  
Old 01-04-2004, 10:58 AM
Tommy Stojanov
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Default Re: Starting the Old Century motor

The start components you want are likely incorportated in the hermetic compressor of that old refrigerator or freezer on the side of the road. Almost all central AC's have it too. There is a potential relay (meaning it closes from start (start is normally closed) to run (run is normally open) due to current draw) and a start capacitor. The centrifugal switches are old technology, but many motor mfg's (AO Smith, Emerson, etc), still use them, as they are cheaper and don't take up much space. There are a couple mfg's that actually use a solid state starting component; we have had a couple motors from pool pumps torn appart with those components. If you need to resize your breaker, please, resize the line to the unit too, I went on a job, "Hey, that plug burned up;" 30A breaker on 12 guage wire, go figure, I just changed out the breaker to a 20. Likely, you will be looking at a 20A circut, so use 12 guage wire at minimum, and for 30A, use 10 guage wire, copper too. Right now I am building a control box for my compressor (compressor compliments of Franz.) I ran 8 guage to the compressor, a bit big, as its 25A, but I didn't have any 10. A contactor, some indicator lights, a 24V transformer, and a 3 way switch circuit. I don't have to get my lazy butt in the garage to turn the compressor on; I can do so from in the basement. Good luck with your project!
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