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Antique Gas Engine Discussion

Drilling valve stems


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  #1  
Old 02-24-2005, 10:00:25 PM
Mark K Mark K is offline
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Default Drilling valve stems

I found a couple of automotive valves that fit into a head that I am working on. They were a bit to long so I cut them off. I just can't drill the ends to put in the pin to hold the valve springs on. They are way to hard. Any suggestions? Thanks
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Old 02-24-2005, 10:23:48 PM
Michael Schlag Michael Schlag is offline
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Default Re: Drilling valve stems

Mark -, the way we do it at the machine shop may waste a drill but it works!
This is one way you can do it at home without a carbide drill.We heat the stem red hot and drill it while it is still red, we have tapped holes in hardened parts this way too. Of course this is only if you have tried to anneal the stem first and that does not work.
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Old 02-24-2005, 10:24:11 PM
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Dick Graybill Dick Graybill is offline
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Default Re: Drilling valve stems

Mark Check "John Deere Valves" On Dick Weltys Post. Maybe That Will Give You An Idea. Dick In Snowy Central Pa.
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Old 02-25-2005, 12:42:31 AM
Dick Welty Dick Welty is offline
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Default Re: Drilling valve stems

Mark,

As Dick Graybill suggested see my thread followup on "John Deere valves".

Also I forgot to mention that any time I want to drill something round like a valve stem I first grind a small flat spot where I want to start the hole I also center punch the exact spot. I sometimes start with a small drill then follow up with the size I need.

I hope this helps.

Dick
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Old 02-25-2005, 02:07:32 AM
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Craig A Craig A is offline
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Default Re: Drilling valve stems

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Schlag
This is one way you can do it at home without a carbide drill.We heat the stem red hot and drill it while it is still red,
We've done the same thing!!! But we HAVE run into stems that wouldn't even drill at red heat!!! Some of those new valves are really something!!!!
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Old 02-25-2005, 02:58:44 PM
Daniel Dorece Daniel Dorece is offline
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Default Re: Drilling valve stems

If you find anything metal that is just to hard to drill find a shop that has a tap blaster. they will drill thru anything.
Dan
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Old 02-25-2005, 02:59:01 PM
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Forrest A Forrest A is offline
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Default Re: Drilling valve stems

When you are heating up the valve stem you are basicaly anealing it. You may find it possible to heat it up to a nice cherry red and letting it cool slowly, no water or even blowing on it. You should be able to drill with a good high speed steel bit. A flat spot is a good idea and starting the hole with center drill will also help. Start with a small bit and work your way up to the hole size needed. When drilling with small drills use the highest speed available and lots of cutting fluid too. Be mindful of sodium filled valves, which some automotive valves contain, it's nasty and should be avoided.

Forrest A
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Old 02-25-2005, 04:13:57 PM
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David M. Lyon David M. Lyon is offline
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Default Re: Drilling valve stems

Take a small cutter wheel and cut a grove around the tip of the stem, then use a horseshoe type keeper...That way you don't have to worry about drilling a hole in a hardned valve stem. And believe me, some of them are diamond hard!

David M.
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Old 02-25-2005, 06:10:41 PM
Dick Welty Dick Welty is offline
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Default Re: Drilling valve stems

I have also used Davids' method of cutting a grove around the tip. If you have any of the retaining washers for the horseshoe retainer this will work fine. Some want to retain the original look of the cotter pin and so want to drill the hole. I am not a purest and am more interested in restoring the engine to working condition tham I am in making it look like it came off of the assembly line.

Many Farmers, Blacksmiths and other users used what ever tools and parts they had at hand to keep these engines going. When I am retired I might become more of a purest as I will probably have more time to tinker with my treasures.

I have also made the the retainer washer by soldering a washer with a big hole onto a washer with small hole that fits the valve stem. I then made the horseshoe retainer by cutting 2 parallel cuts into the center of a washer that are just the width of the hole in the center of the washer.

I then heated this washer horseshoe clip red hot and dumped in into transmission fluid to harden it so that it wouldn't wear or spread apart with use. The engine I did this to has not experienced any trouble since.

Dick
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Old 02-26-2005, 12:53:38 AM
JoeFisher JoeFisher is offline
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Default Re: Drilling valve stems

if you have a small 1/8" masonary bit, regrind it to standard drillbit angle and turn it slow with lots of oil and pressure. has always worked for me. warm in Texas Joe
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Old 02-26-2005, 01:58:37 AM
CharlieBiler CharlieBiler is offline
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Default Re: Drilling valve stems

Others have mentioned, and I am repeating. Get a carbide drill and do the deed. I find that anealling the newer valves is sometimes useless. With todays materials, carbide is becoming a necessity.
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