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Electrolysis for a igniter


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  #1  
Old 04-10-2005, 11:01:48 PM
Dale Sawchuk
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Default Electrolysis for a igniter

I put an rusted igniter in a plastic pail and hooked up to electrolysis. I was wondering on average how long to leave it in, like 1 night or 1 week. I am a first timer to it and was wondering approx how long it would take. I have it in a 1 gallon tank with a 12 volt charger on 4 amps. After 2 hours there is scum floating on the top. Should i check it in the morning or leave for a few days? I made just like it was recommended on the net but on a smaller scale . thanks Dale
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  #2  
Old 04-11-2005, 12:29:20 AM
Franz Franz is offline
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Default Re: Electrolysis for a igniter

Check it every few hours, brush it off to see how the process is doing, and stick it back in if it needs to work more.

The process will stop itself when the rust is gone, or the collector is contaminated.
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Old 04-11-2005, 09:40:21 AM
Orrin Orrin is offline
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Default Re: Electrolysis for a igniter

If the polarity is correct on your setup (negative lead connected to the part being cleaned), you can leave it in the solution as long as you want and no harm will be done. (Except for springs. More on that, later.)

If the part has nooks and crannies and crevices between moving parts, the process could take a long time. I once left a post drill in the vat for three weeks while I was on vacation. It had been in a fire and everything was stuck, beforehand, but nothing was stuck, afterward.

Springs and hardened metals are subject to hydrogen embrittlement in the electrolysis vat. In other words, they might break, easily, afterwards. I address this and other issues in this writeup.

http://users.moscow.com/oiseming/rustdemo/rustdemo.htm

Orrin
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Old 04-11-2005, 02:43:17 PM
Dale Sawchuk
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Default Re: Electrolysis for a igniter

Thanks Guys, I found some info and went for it. This system works wonders. I was not sure what to think at first. The igniter looks like new but is still stuck after 15 hours. I will leave it in for another day. I am going to use this system whenever i can. I just made a small unit out of a small 1 gallon pail and a old Carter trickle charger at 12 volts, 4 amp. It started to bubble right away and after a few hours it had scum floating on top. I used just regular baking soda as that is all i had. Thanks Dale
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Old 04-11-2005, 07:52:33 PM
Al Wait Al Wait is offline
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Default Re: Electrolysis for a igniter

You need WASHING soda, not baking soda. Also made by Arm & Hammer, and available at any grocery store for $1 or so. Al Wait
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Old 04-12-2005, 01:53:32 AM
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Rob Skinner Rob Skinner is offline
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Default Re: Electrolysis for a igniter

Quote:
Originally Posted by Al Wait
You need WASHING soda, not baking soda. Also made by Arm & Hammer, and available at any grocery store for $1 or so. Al Wait
Why is baking soda unacceptable, Al?
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Old 04-12-2005, 06:53:49 AM
Bill Schaller Bill Schaller is offline
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Default Re: Electrolysis for a igniter

You are better off checking on it regularly. To find out if your anode has fouled and needs to be cleaned off. also, as the part cleans up, you can often start to disassemble it so different areas can be cleaned, etc. You can often clean the part up, use a wire brush or a power washer half way through the job, and it will go a lot faster. It is possible there are different metals involved that don't like your solution, and you can see what is happening.
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Old 04-12-2005, 10:01:04 AM
Kevin O. Pulver Kevin O. Pulver is offline
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Default Re: Electrolysis for a igniter

I've used the washing soda, but obviously it's working for Dale to use baking soda. I'm not a chemist, but I've been told that if you use BOTH the sodium carbonate (washing) and the sodium BI-carbonate (Baking) that it will actually work better. They say you get 3 molecules working for you instead of one. Does anybody care to confirm the chemistry for us please? Kevin
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Old 04-12-2005, 10:21:19 AM
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Elden DuRand Elden DuRand is offline
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Exclamation Re: Electrolysis for a igniter

I've used sodium bicarbonate for electrolysis in the past (worked okay) but earlier this year I looked at the contents of a product you see advertised on TeeVee called "Oxy-Clean". This stuff contains sodium carbonate and sodium percarbonate

I put a little in water and turned on the juice. It works very well and doesn't seem to have any bad habits.

DISCLAIMER:
This information is worth what you paid for it.

Take care - Elden
http://home.cybertron.com/~edurand
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Old 04-12-2005, 07:09:32 PM
Kevin O. Pulver Kevin O. Pulver is offline
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Default Re: Electrolysis for a igniter

SO where are the chemical engineers? I don't even know what sodium PERCARBONATE is. Which is best? sodium carbonate, BI-carbonate, or PER-carbonate, or some combination of the three? How about putting some hydrogen peroxide in the mix, would that do any good? I knew I should have taken some chemistry... Kevin
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Old 04-12-2005, 10:50:43 PM
BillsToys BillsToys is offline
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Default Re: Electrolysis for a igniter

As a chemist. It is the electric current that does the work. Even a pinch or so of salt will work. (May get more flash rusting afterwords and some other problems.) What works best is the washing soda. It will use about half the current to do the job. Washing soda will generate a higher pH (more basic system) that favors the desired reactions. At least untill the crud really starts building up. Also, the washing soda will do a little better job in getting under lose paint scale and penetrate any slight oil contamination and cracks. But, if it works go ahead and get the job done.

If using a gallon can for a container, remember the container is being dissolved and a leak is to be expected.
Bill in Ohio,
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Old 04-13-2005, 12:10:11 AM
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Default Re: Electrolysis for a igniter

A couple thousand hours of running this process with washing soda indicates it is the best electrolyte. Baking soda will work, but not as well.

This is in reality, a simple electroplating process, where rust is being plated onto an electrode, and like all electroplating, different solutions are required for the electrolyte.

SALT is a Bad Guy in this process. If an object has been rusted in salt water, the salt leaching out of the object will contaminate the electrolyte, and kill the process.
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