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Antique Gas Engine Discussion

Interesting reading


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  #1  
Old 06-01-2005, 06:08:33 AM
Leonard Keifer Leonard Keifer is offline
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Default Interesting reading

I thought you folks would appreciate this gem.

To remind us of how far we’ve come in a little less than 100 years here are a couple of paragraphs from E. W. Longnecker, MD’s book The Practical Gas Engineer, copyright Dec 1910. I bought this book at the McCleary auction last weekend.

380. EXPLORING THE INTERIOR OF THE CYLINDER.—It is sometimes necessary to explore the interior of the gas engine cylinder with a lighted candle, for the purpose of locating some sharp projection, burnt carbon, crack, or sand hole, etc. When doing this always remenber that a CHARGE OF FUEL may remain in the cylinder, and whether the candle is inserted through one of the valve ports or the open end of the cylinder, be sure to keep YOUR FACE away from the opening.

381. The lighted candle will ignite the charge, and the flash through the open port may result in a seriously burnt face. The candle is usually put into the cylinder on the end of a long sharp wire or stick.

Wow, exciting times!
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Old 06-01-2005, 07:41:40 AM
Harvey Teal Harvey Teal is offline
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Default Re: Interesting reading

Then they learned how to inspect them during the daylight hours.....
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Old 06-01-2005, 07:42:12 AM
Smoke Smoke is offline
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Default Re: Interesting reading

Good message Leonard, Things as simple as a flashlight seemed so far away. Nothing better than a Piston Fire Ball kissing you on the forehead.
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Old 06-01-2005, 01:00:39 PM
Sky
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Default Re: Interesting reading

i dont think i wanna do that kind of engine exploration!
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Old 06-01-2005, 02:06:20 PM
Harry Harry is offline
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Default Re: Interesting reading

It seems that I heard once that IHC or others provided an inspection port on the side of the cylinder opposite the ignitor so that one could inspect the spark at the points. Insert fuel - so much for the inspection port!
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Old 06-01-2005, 04:52:18 PM
John Roop John Roop is offline
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Default Re: Interesting reading

Hey, Leonard
You would not not look so good after flash fire like that, your long gray beard & hair would be gone.
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Old 06-01-2005, 05:18:50 PM
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Mike Monnier Mike Monnier is offline
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Default Re: Interesting reading

I remember reading that same basic passage in one of the old engine books in my collection. I don't think I'll be using a candle to inspect the combustion chamber of any of my engines. When I was a youngster Dad used to ask jokingly if I needed a match when I was looking in the filler to check the level in the gas tank of the lawn mower. He must have read that same book!
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Old 06-02-2005, 01:40:25 AM
Andrew Mackey Andrew Mackey is offline
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Exclamation Re: Interesting reading

2 years ago, 2 fine young gentlemen from south of the border stole a Corvette of '60s vintage. It quit running in the next town west of mine. The 2 idiots decided to see if there was any gas in the tank, by holding a BIC lighter by the fuel cap, and peering in (the fuel fill was in top of the 'trunk'.) The fuel tank promptly blew up, flipping the car 15 feet away, and onto its roof. The 2 Maroons were blown about 20 yards in the opposite direction, suffering severe burns and cuts from the shrapnel from the burst tank, and the fool with the lighter had his hand nearly sheared off by the fuel cap. The blast blew out windows for blocks, and was heard clearly in our town center, nearly 4 miles away!
Andrew
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Old 06-03-2005, 12:17:33 AM
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Larry Evans Larry Evans is offline
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Default Re: Interesting reading

Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry
It seems that I heard once that IHC or others provided an inspection port on the side of the cylinder opposite the ignitor so that one could inspect the spark at the points. Insert fuel - so much for the inspection port!
I am fortunate enough to get to operate a 1911 50 hp. Fairbanks Morse 2 cylinder type RE. It has a compression release release for each cylinder about 90 degrees around from the ignitor. The operator's manual has this to say about them: "Test or relief valves are provided near the top of each cylinder, by means of which the explosion chamber may be vented to the atmosphere when turning engine over by hand, and which may be opened when engine is running to test strength and regularity of the explosions in each cylinder."

Sometime, I might get brave enough to try it.

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Larry Evans
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Old 06-03-2005, 06:10:12 AM
Leonard Keifer Leonard Keifer is offline
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Default Re: Interesting reading

Larry, I think I'd just leave those ports closed! Or at least stand way back, I expect fire shoots way out.
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Old 06-03-2005, 11:47:19 AM
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Larry Evans Larry Evans is offline
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Default Re: Interesting reading

Quote:
Originally Posted by Leonard Keifer
Larry, I think I'd just leave those ports closed! Or at least stand way back, I expect fire shoots way out.
With over 1200 cubic inches per cylinder, the potential is definitely there for an interesting display.

Larry Evans
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