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Antique Gas Engine Discussion Meet collectors of hit and miss engines, ask questions about collecting, restoring and showing antique flywheel engines.

Antique Gas Engine Discussion

Bulldog is FINALLY done...


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  #1  
Old 06-04-2005, 04:26:07 PM
Chris Kirk Chris Kirk is offline
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Default Bulldog is FINALLY done...

Well, it took me a year and a half, but I finally got the 5HP Bulldog running today. Here's what it took - Buy "Bulldog in a basket" for WAY too much...discover that mixer is wrong...find mixer for pattern, have new mixer cast, cut and welded, machined...find crank guard, have new one cast...drill bolt holes in crank guard...sandblast flywheels, find crack...recast flywheel...machine new flywheel...have keyway cut...buy and machine new gib keys...strip all of the old parts and paint...find new valve springs and cut to size...have valves cut to size...have governor spring control, detent roller/plate, wrist pin, mag trip finger, mag trip rod, valve spring retainers and keepers fabricated...make gaskets for oiler and polish oiler...buy kiln dried white oak and build cart...fabricate cart steering mechanism...sand, sand, sand, paint, and assmeble cart...buy new rings...make all gaskets...cut shims and fit main and rod bearings...have mag and ignitor completely rebuilt...blast out gas tank...plumb fuel system...put the whole thing together and get 'er running...

Many thanks to...

Nick Lozzi for fabricating governor and mag trip parts...
Al Koch for showing me how to machine a flywheel on a vertical mill and letting me use his shop...
Ed Kuni for welding my mixer...
Ray Pichel for casting me a new mixer and crank guard...
Mark Mienke for removing a broken stud from the head and maching the mixer...
Lee Pedersen for supplying the muffler (not shown in picture)...
Ed Deis for supplying me with the small, miscellaneous pieces I needed...

If I forgot anyone, I sincerely apologize.

There's NOTHING like when you spin her over for the 80th time that day after playing with the timing, fuel mix, and making sure the ignitor works, and she hits...and hits...and hits...then happily chugs along in your driveway for the next hour or so.

Chris
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Old 06-04-2005, 05:29:57 PM
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Peter Ruffle Peter Ruffle is offline
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Thumbs up Re: Bulldog is FINALLY done...

Chris,
Nice looking piece of machinery, will we get to see it in Orange June 25/26th?
Peter
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Old 06-04-2005, 08:19:38 PM
Kevin O. Pulver Kevin O. Pulver is offline
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Default Re: Bulldog is FINALLY done...

Looks great Chris! Way to go.
Kevin
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Old 06-04-2005, 09:25:34 PM
Peter Peter is offline
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Default Re: Bulldog is FINALLY done...

I remember the previous discussion about the flywheel. I am curious how you prepared the pattern. I assume you used the cracked flywheel? any core needed for the hub? Did you use cattail foundry? any allowance need for shrinkage?

Looks like a very rewarding project, very nice.
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Old 06-04-2005, 09:54:09 PM
Rob Charles Rob Charles is offline
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Default Re: Bulldog is FINALLY done...

Nice Job Chris. I was wondering how you machined the outside of the FW on a BPort?Or did you just do the bore and key leaving the outside as cast?I saw the wheel at the foundry and you did a nice job making the old 1 into the pattern.Rob
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Old 06-04-2005, 11:51:49 PM
Sky
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Default Re: Bulldog is FINALLY done...

Nice job on the bulldog Chris!
im sure that definitly took alot of sweat & tears to get that engine the way it is now, very nice indeedy!
do you by chance have any before pictures? cuz thats one thing i think we all like to see is the bare bones of what it once was before it gets it's well deserved restoration and retirement vacation.
that is one thing i like about engines, no matter what condition, if i myself have a bit of money saved up, i like a good challenge. that is,.....if the machinery is available for me to have access to,...but most of the time, i myself dont have to machine new things...most of the time......but alot of times i do have to find replacement parts...ALOT of replacement parts...corce it's my luck to find parts engines,...so striped down that it's just a pile o parts,...but every once in a while i do get a good baskit case engine here,...very challanging, but rewarding after you here the first pop of the exaust....specially after the engine has set for lord knows how many years! but anywho, again, very nice engine chris, i wouldnt be able to tell if that was factory or not! you'll probably hold on to that one for a long long time wont you? i know i would!
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Old 06-05-2005, 09:28:52 AM
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Elden DuRand Elden DuRand is offline
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Default Re: Bulldog is FINALLY done...

Chris:

It sounds like you are hardheaded like me. I HATE it when someone says "It can't be done".

Now to the important question: How did you go about getting the flywheel cast? Who did the foundry work? My 2 HP Jack of All Trades has a cracked wheel that I've repaired but I'm not happy running it with folks around. I've looked all over and, as of now, haven't found a replacement.

The flywheel has an outside diameter of 24", rim width is 1-3/4", the crankshaft is 1-1/2" and the hub is 3" long. The really hard part is that it's an early 2-bolt wheel.

Thanks and take care - Elden
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Old 06-05-2005, 06:00:08 PM
Chris Kirk Chris Kirk is offline
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Default Re: Bulldog is FINALLY done...

Peter - Yes, I did use the original flywheel as a pattern. I did no prep other than build the outside rim up 1/4", and filling up the crank hole 1/4" as well by tapping in a piece of PVC pipe. I did use Cattail, and they did a nice job...cost was $250. In general, you will have to allow 1/8" shrinkage per foot when using an original piece as a patter (this is per Emmanuel King, the owner of Cattail). Compensating for shrinkage is most important on critical dimensions, i.e. total diameter of flywheel and hub. I didn't do any prep to the outside of the hub, spokes, etc, and you can't notice any difference between the new flywheel and the original one.

Rob - Here is how we machined the flywheel: 1) mount the flywheel on table of mill using 2 parallel blocks and 2 stepped hold-downs...get it as level as you can 2) find the center of the hub as best you can...we used a dial indicator on the OD diameter of the hub 3) bore the hub 4) face the end of the hub...we used an end mill 5) fashion a bung for the newly bored hub with a hole in the center for a bolt...the bung should be tight enough so that the flywheel can spin on it, but no loose enough to have any wobble 6) flip the flywheel so its resting on the table on the surface of the faced hub 7) face the other side of the hub 8) put the bung in the hole in the hub of the flywheel, place a bolt through the hole in the center of the bung and bolt the bung/flywheel to the mill table using a T hold in one of the channels and a BIG washer...you now have the flywheel mounted to the table of the mill so that it can spin on the bung...you can move the flyhweel into any tool using the table controls 8) machine the outside rim using and end mill 9) machine the face using a BIG end mill 10) flip the flywheel and machine the other outside rim 11) Pay a machine shop to cut the keyway because we didn't have a 1/2" broach. All of this was done using manual feed (powered by ME) and a bar for leverage. I don't know if this is clear or not. If you want to know more, let me know, and I'll try to get you some pictures.

Chris
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