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Antique Gas Engine Discussion Meet collectors of hit and miss engines, ask questions about collecting, restoring and showing antique flywheel engines.

Antique Gas Engine Discussion

More Stover KE Help


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  #1  
Old 07-30-2005, 05:20:22 PM
Paul Dickerson Paul Dickerson is offline
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Default More Stover KE Help

I heard a hit and miss for the first time at a tractor show recently and have become an instant enthusiast. Even more recently, I picked up a Stover KE 1 1/2 HP (SN 173439) that was frozen up. The tag says "T. Eaton", but they were only a re-seller. I am in need of a manual and some parts. Any leads and/or general information about the engine would be greatly appreciated.

Does anyone know what to do about very sloppy valve guides? Do they come out or are they cast into the head? If they come out, how do you get them out? Should I try to remove them or drill a larger hole and press in a bronze bushing? Where can I get new valves and a new head gasket?
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Old 07-30-2005, 06:16:59 PM
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Elden DuRand Elden DuRand is offline
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Default Re: More Stover KE Help

Paul:

If your engine runs all right, it's questionable if rebushing the intake guide will improve things.

Most of these engines didn't have bushings. The head was just reamed to fit the valve. If you want to re-bush, it's a good idea to have a shop do it because they can get the old guide bored out accurately and the bushing will be concentric with the valve seat. If the guide is not concentric, you may never be able to get the valve to seat properly.

Anyhoo - most flywheel engines have pretty sloppy valve fit anyway.

Hope this helped.

Take care - Elden
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Old 07-30-2005, 07:43:53 PM
Neale Behm Neale Behm is offline
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Default Re: More Stover KE Help

Paul,
There are a number of sponsors to this website that can help you with manuals, parts or machine work. Just take a look at their ads on the "Sponsors" tab.

I'm with E.D. There's a fair chance you'll be able to get the engine running withough machine work. Sure, it's nice to have the gears, pivot points, valve stems, etc. all snug as the day they rolled out the factory door. Very few of us is going to make our living or keep our family alive by running the engine so it doesn't really need to be perfect to be able to run in shows for many years to come. You will learn quickly that it's easy to spend far more than the engine is worth in making it as nice as you'd like.

As to the sloppy valves....if they are worn too bad to get the engine running you can get the guides bored oversize and install new valves with oversize stems.

Good luck and keep us posted on what you wind up doing to bring the KE back to life.

Thanks Harry
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Old 08-04-2005, 02:03:05 AM
Paul Dickerson Paul Dickerson is offline
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Default Re: More Stover KE Help

Got some good advise from Ed at HitnMiss Enterprises. Looks like the valve guides are cast into the head. Glad I didn't try to press them out! The guide holes are not only sloppy, they are oval shaped. They definitely need attention before the engine will run again. Ed recommend not pressing in a bronze bushing because it may not go in exactly straight, and then it wouldn't align with the hole. I hadn't thought of that. I am a bit concerned because the holes are so sloppy. Drilling and reaming might not produce a concentric hole.

My current plan, after mulling it over a bit, is to use some hold downs to suspend 2 pieces of flat bar over the milling machine table and clamp/bolt the head upside-down to the underside of the flatbars so that the valve seats are exposed. Then I can center on the valve seats, mill and ream the guides oversized, and dress the valve seats all without moving the milling machine table.
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Old 08-04-2005, 09:33:11 AM
Jim Tremble Jim Tremble is online now
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Default Re: More Stover KE Help

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Dickerson
Got some good advise from Ed at HitnMiss Enterprises. Looks like the valve guides are cast into the head. Glad I didn't try to press them out! The guide holes are not only sloppy, they are oval shaped. They definitely need attention before the engine will run again. Ed recommend not pressing in a bronze bushing because it may not go in exactly straight, and then it wouldn't align with the hole. I hadn't thought of that. I am a bit concerned because the holes are so sloppy. Drilling and reaming might not produce a concentric hole.

My current plan, after mulling it over a bit, is to use some hold downs to suspend 2 pieces of flat bar over the milling machine table and clamp/bolt the head upside-down to the underside of the flatbars so that the valve seats are exposed. Then I can center on the valve seats, mill and ream the guides oversized, and dress the valve seats all without moving the milling machine table.
Paul

Make sure that you have the head level on the table before you bore the guide. Use a dial indicator and shims. The casting may not be the same thickness all the way around.

Just a thought, Good luck,

Jim
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Old 08-04-2005, 01:59:35 PM
Joe Morris Joe Morris is offline
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Default Re: More Stover KE Help

Paul, before you spend a lot of money on machine shop work etc, keep this in mind, you can soon get more money invested than the engine may be worth.as you have been advised earlier. As far as valve guides are concerned I have restored at least 175+ engines that I can remember over 23 years and have never had to replace but one valve guide that was broken. So, in that case I had no choice. You are working on an engine that at top RPMs is turning slower than a car engine will idle. It is easy to invest $200.00 OR more for a missing magneto. Missing parts can get expensive . lLiteratre is available through advertisers on Smok Stak as well as some. but not all replacement parts. I hope this will help a little good luck in a good hobby. Joe Moris
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Old 08-04-2005, 02:26:26 PM
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KeithW KeithW is offline
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Default Re: More Stover KE Help

Sounds like a good approach for the valve guides. The key is to make sure you are concentric with the valve seats. Make sure you are centered in the valve seat and perpendicular with it. Make the inside of the bushing undersized and ream to fit. This will give you a second chance to get it straight. Measure lots of times and think about it a bunch before cutting metal. Found this out the hard way and have to relearn it on occasion.

keithw
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Old 08-11-2005, 08:03:51 AM
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Chuck Martin Chuck Martin is offline
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Default Re: More Stover KE Help

I would polish up the the valve stem, clean up the guide, apply a silicone release on the valve stem, carfully assembleand clamp the valve down into the seat. Then carfully apply JB weld around the guide and valve stem. Check the epoxy as it cures, when it is almost set, fingernail still leaves a mark in it, carfully remove the valve.

This will last for years, lets you get the engine running without a lot of cost, and is not permanent, if you want to reseat it, it comes out with a little heat from a torch. and only cost about $3.00.
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