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Hi temp paint for small Engines


What is the most durable hi temp paint available for small engines? I want to repaint a couple and...

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  #1  
Old 08-18-2005, 11:43 PM
Dave C Dave C is offline
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Default Hi temp paint for small Engines

What is the most durable hi temp paint available for small engines?
I want to repaint a couple and I am looking for the most durable small engine paint available.
I am also wondering if they have a type of high temp etching primer for priming some of the aluminum parts. I just bought another Lauson today and they are primarily cast iron but there are some aluminum parts.
Thanks
Dave
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  #2  
Old 08-19-2005, 01:50 AM
Sky
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Default Re: Hi temp paint for small Engines

i know i have menchined it quite a few times but i would use BPS paint, that you can get from tractor supply, the stuff is very durable, after a full 2 week period of drying, that stuff is hard and hardens even more as time goes by, and gas resistant, im getting to were i almost swear by that stuff.
dont add anything to the paint, atleast i dont, let it go from straight out of the can or from right out of the gallon or pint container. as far as heat resistant, i have BPS on the head and on the rest of my fairbanks, and i have let the fairbanks run at working speed, and the paint right next to the exaust still aint changed or turned colors so it appears the BPS has it's streinghts of heat resistant too.
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Old 08-19-2005, 01:55 AM
Sky
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Default Re: Hi temp paint for small Engines

and about primer, i would use red oxide primer then primer sealer, or the ACE hardware stuff brand, RUST STOP. those 3 primers have prooved to me that they stand up to very hot temps, it's the paint that you use that makes the diference in my experience. NOTE: (expeireinces may differ)
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Old 08-19-2005, 03:00 AM
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Default Re: Hi temp paint for small Engines

I still maintain that for the easiest availability and widest selection of colors, Dupli-Color brand engine enamel in spray cans is my choice. You can get it at Auto Zone, Advance Auto Parts, K-Mart, Wal Mart, etc. They list 40 colors on their web-site.
Color Chart
They claim it will withstand 500 degrees. I have painted several small air cooled engines with a variety of their colors and none have shown any discoloration, bubbling, flaking or peeling. All were bead blasted, washed with hot soapy water (dish detergent), dried with a standard blow dryer for hair (don't use compressed air because it could contain oily moisture) and then sprayed down with carb cleaner to eliminate all traces of grease, oil or soap. I don't use primer. The can says you should respray within one hour if it needs another coat (and you should spray several light coats or it will run if you try to put too much on at one time). You should wait 5 days for it to fully cure before shooting it again if it still needs more. On a typical engine I'll go through close to 2 cans if everything gets the same color, but usually there will be a couple of colors involved. I like to paint aluminum heads, some carbs and maybe the flywheel with aluminum color (silver) and sometimes I'll do the throttle / governor linkage in a contrasting color like black. Some people obsess over matching a certain factory color exactly. I like variety. I am currently doing a Lauson TLC with Dupli-Color "Torque 'N' Teal", a Lauson RSC is getting "Detroit Diesel Alpine Green"
Be different!
John Newman, Jr.
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Old 08-19-2005, 07:42 PM
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Default Re: Hi temp paint for small Engines

Here is a picture of the 2 Lauson engines mentioned above. They are both still a long way from being finished, but I stacked the parts together enough to give you an idea of what they will look like when finished. The base of the TLC (on the left) still needs more paint, but I ran out of this color. I shoot the bottom first and then when it dries I'll turn it over and shoot the top - the side that will show on the completed engine. The RSC (on the right) has an aluminum crankcase and also has an extra capacity oil sump / base.
John Newman, Jr.
Saint Louis, MO
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Old 08-20-2005, 10:10 AM
Sean B. Sean B. is offline
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Smile Re: Hi temp paint for small Engines

I tried out a new idea an my last briggs that turned out really well. I painted the sheetmetal and the block with cheap spray enamel, let it cure about a week, and then I used automotive clearcoat sprayed from a gun. The gloss and depth is unreal! It costs a little more this way, but I have never seen another engine shine like this one! Its not original in that sense, but I agree with John, do it your own way and be proud. The factory paint jobs on most of these engines was pretty poor, so even a quick rattle can job is probally far better than when they were new.
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Old 08-20-2005, 01:29 PM
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Default Re: Hi temp paint for small Engines

John,
Nice looking Lausons you have there I Have a Lauson 6 hp, air cooled, 2 cyl opposed outboard boat motor that I want to return to original condition ! The power head tin work is a light tan, control levers aluminum, lower unit is also alum. I plan on beading everything and was wondering whether to paint the aluminum with a like colored finish with a clear coat or just a clear coat !
Also what's your thought on applying paint,letting it dry over nite then baking in 250- 300* oven for 20 minutes or so? I have a neighbor who has always done this and say's he's never had any crinkeling around gas cap from spilled gas. Only drawback is his wife doesn't appreciate her oven being used for baking engin parts I told him to look for a used wall oven and intsall it in garage,can bake anything that will fit anytime he want's. Even have TV dinners when she kicks him out for bringing another hunk of rusty iron home Thank you...
Gene
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Old 08-21-2005, 07:11 PM
Greg Downard Greg Downard is offline
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Default Re: Hi temp paint for small Engines

Never had much luck with hardware store brand paint bombs. Several years ago I began using only auto type paint bombs. A exellent primer I have been using is "SEM" brand self etching primer $16 a can. It is light green and really adhears to Aluminum. I use VHT or CMT brand high temp engine enamels as much as I can. If I need to I will use Plasti-Cote but as the last resort. Auto Value Parts stores.

Paint bombs use a different hardening agent than you would use in regular auto paint. Even though it claims to be cured in a couple of weeks, It takes many weeks for the liquids to eveporate out of them. I would never recommend using the Wife's or Mom's oven for anykind of paint curing. A local thought he was safe after 4 weeks and put a month old paint job on some old valve covers in his Mom's oven to cure them. Needless to say they had to replace the whole kitchen and the insurance company claimed negligence and fought them in court. I use a heat lamp with lots of open air flow.

I have found that most paint will become hard enough to withstand gasoline sooner or later. So I just be real carefull when filling and never fill them full so they slosh out.

Also be carefull using clearcoat on engines. They look fantastic shinny and all but most engines are air cooled and the heavy coat of clearcoat will hold that heat in. Same goes for the water cooled engines. You never see a auto engine or engine compartment parts with heavy paint on them. The thinner coat of paint the better on the blocks, heads, and areas of great heat disapation.

My opinion is keep the oil, dirt and gasoline wiped off and they will look good for years to come.
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Old 08-22-2005, 02:54 PM
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Default Re: Hi temp paint for small Engines

i use rustoleum "hard hat" from the can for my small air cooled engines. as the name implies, this stuff is harder than nails when it cures. i found a UV light speeds the process. make sure to paint when humidity is low. it is available at some auto parts stores and also Granger Industrial Supply if you have one in yur area.

i used it on my model y briggs with great success. i wet sanded my shoud (waiting about 2 days to dry between coats and using 600 grit) 3 times and the final finish is unreal. way better than factory.

on my hit and miss engines i found that benjamin moore "alkyd" works really well. the alkyd takes forever to cure. gasoline, oil and brake cleaner dont really affect it but carb cleaner seems to take it right off. also i never use primer unless the part will not be getting painted for a while.
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Old 08-22-2005, 04:51 PM
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Default Re: Hi temp paint for small Engines

Greg I didn't mean to clear coat the engine itself just the tin work and aluminum control levers and recoil start housing
Gene
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Old 08-22-2005, 05:41 PM
Greg Downard Greg Downard is offline
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Red face Re: Hi temp paint for small Engines

I understand Gene. Them are non heat disipating items and the CC makes them look fantastic. It was a general comment to all. Refrazing the comment, beware of using Clear Coat on the parts that would disipate heat. Ie: blocks, fins, heads, water tanks, ect. The heavier the coat of any kind of paint on these items the less heat will disipate. The cooler the engine runs the longer they will last.
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Old 08-22-2005, 07:58 PM
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Default Re: Hi temp paint for small Engines

Just curious, why do you not use primer?
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Old 08-22-2005, 08:58 PM
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Default Re: Hi temp paint for small Engines

There are two reasons I don't use primer.
#1 - I don't know how heat resistant it is. The paint I use, however, clearly states it will take 500*. Plus, adding another layer will certainly retain more heat rather than assist in disapating it. Now most (if not all...) of the engines I have painted this way are for displaying at shows and don't do any real work, so over-heating probably isn't much of an issue.
#2 - I am painting over a freshly beadblasted surface. If the paint won't stick to that, I don't feel primer is going to help.
Just my opinion - doesn't mean I actually know anything!
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Last edited by John Newman, Jr.; 08-22-2005 at 09:03 PM.
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Old 08-23-2005, 05:37 AM
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Default Re: Hi temp paint for small Engines

those are exactly the same reasons why i don't used primer.
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Old 08-23-2005, 06:10 AM
Leonard Keifer Leonard Keifer is offline
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Default Re: Hi temp paint for small Engines

The high heat paints I've bought state clearly on the can DO NOT use primer. That was a good enough reason for me but the two John listed are also excellent.
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