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Antique Farm Tractors Vintage farm tractors on rubber tires with various implements. Ford, John Deere, Oliver, McCormick and more.

Antique Farm Tractors

What is a "live" and "non live" pto?

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Old 02-02-2006, 07:27 PM
Austen Austen is offline
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Default What is a "live" and "non live" pto?

I was wondering if anyone could explain the difference to me between a "live pto" and a "pto"? When my John Deere is in neutral and is running, you can here and see the pto spinning. Does this mean it's a "live" pto? Also, the pto spins while the switch to it is not engaged, I found that on other tractors that I've driven too.
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Old 02-02-2006, 08:32 PM
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Tom Sampson Tom Sampson is offline
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Default Re: What is a "live" and "non live" pto?

To my understanding a live PTO is one that stays engaged and turning even when the clutch is disengaged. A regular PTO will stop turning when you push in the clutch. Some times when there is nothing hooked up to the PTO and you step on the clutch there is still a little friction on the plates causing the PTO to spin. That is how I believe it works.
If I'm incorrect please let me know.
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Old 02-02-2006, 08:35 PM
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MCanady MCanady is offline
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Default Re: What is a "live" and "non live" pto?

Non live pto is driven by transmission gearing - for when you are mowing with your tractor and you clutch or turn sharp the pto stops turning. Live PTO is driven directly from your engine by a 2 stage clutch to the PTO output shaft. Think about the oldtimers pulling a haybaler/combine/cornsnapper with non live PTO would have to be Quick to knock transmission out of gear to it from plugging up and keep PTO turning. Also there is Independant PTO which is the best! Thanks Harry
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Old 02-02-2006, 11:07 PM
John G. Simpson John G. Simpson is offline
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Default Re: What is a "live" and "non live" pto?

a non-live pto can be hazardous to your tractor and possibly you. if you are running a bushhog or other equipment with rotating parts, pushing in the clutch only disengages the engine. the bushhog or? will continue to drive the tractor.many fences, trees have been "runned over".ditches, ponds and walls, we don't even want to think about. BUY an overrunning clutch for the pto shaft. best money you can spend. happy farming.
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Old 02-02-2006, 11:26 PM
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Default Re: What is a "live" and "non live" pto?

As said before, Live PTO allows the powerdriven implement to continue operating even though the clutch may be disengaged. "Clutching" your way through a slug when baling hay is a very common thing to do. The "regular" PTO is operating only when the clutch in engaged.
An overrunning clutch only allows the PTO shaft to turn, even though the power to it has stopped. This gives a lot of "cushion" when shutting down the PTO drive on a machine like a baler, or combine which has so much enertial energy that it slows down very gradually. Those old square balers had a huge flywheel that took a lot of power to get turning, and took a long time for them to stop once the PTO was disengaged.
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Old 07-06-2010, 01:48 AM
Geoff Hale Geoff Hale is offline
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Default Re: What is a "live" and "non live" pto?

Ok boys can you explain in Bay men terms : I have a ford 2n when i push in the cluch the PTO stops when i take my foot off the PTO starts up again .In neutral foot of the cluch PTO still turns.Tried to run a square JD baler don't have the hp to run baler and move the tractor both. So would this be a live PTO ? Not much of a farmer didn't grow up around a farm.
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Old 07-06-2010, 08:13 AM
John Schwiebert John Schwiebert is offline
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Default Re: What is a "live" and "non live" pto?

NO: The fors PTO is driven from the transmission. There are also PTO"s that are semi-live because they run off of a 2 stage clutch. Push the clutch petal half way down, the movement of the tractor stops, but the PTO keeps running. Push the clutch petal all the way down and both the PTO & the tractors stop. This is a popular set up on tractors of European design, examples M-F David Brown,etc. In a live PTO the PTO has a seperate clutch. Early good examples: The Cockshutt 30 and the Oliver Fleetline series(66-77 & 88)
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Old 07-06-2010, 10:34 AM
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Elden DuRand Elden DuRand is offline
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Default Re: What is a "live" and "non live" pto?

Years ago, when I was shopping for a tractor to bush hog and pull stumps with, I seriously considered a 9N Ford but an old farmer friend convinced me to look at an Allis-Chalmers WD45. It was, at the time, the cheapest used tractor you could get that had an independent PTO.

I really appreciated his advice because it allowed me to use the hand clutch to stop and reverse the tractor while the mower kept going. Also, if I hit a rough patch and had to stop everything quickly, all I had to do was to stab the foot clutch and everything would stop.

Take care - Elden
Take care - Elden
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