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Restoration of a fully seized and rusted engine


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  #1  
Old 08-17-2008, 04:15 PM
David Cave David Cave is offline
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Default Restoration of a fully seized and rusted engine

I am beginning my first restoration of a fully seized and rusted engine. Can anyone suggest a good book or piece of literature to guide me. How to break free seized elements, the order things should be done in, etc. would be useful. I have fixed up several engines that were free and generally complete but this is my first rust bucket.
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Old 08-17-2008, 05:49 PM
Bud Tierney Bud Tierney is offline
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Default Re: Engine Restoration

Well, with all due respect, that's a little like asking how high is up...there're so many variables, it's hard to say.
Is the engine rare, parts hard to find?? If so, extreme care, soaking everything, using minimum force, etc is indicated...
Relatively common, relatively cheap, available parts?? Hammer away, get a crowbar on the ring gear, stuff like that. (Humor!!)
Seriously, though: pulling the head lets you see the top end; pulling the pan lets you see the bottom. Pulling the timing chain/gear cover lets you see what the front looks like, etc.
Don't know of any particular book (but there certainly are some), but check the postings on the ag/tractor sites like ytmag.com; apparently because some of their equipment sits for long periods, and they restore a lot of leftovers, there're dozens of posts about seized engines, and as many recipes for concoctions/procedures to break them loose.
But once "loose", do you dare even turning it over, risking serious damage from unseen rust in bearings, frozen valve train, etc, or should you simply dismantle it to the smallest parts?? That's a decision you have to make on the ground.
With sympathy, Bud
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Old 08-17-2008, 06:57 PM
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Default Re: Engine Restoration

Lots of heat and stuff they call Kroil. If you have time on your hand however, there's electralisis/electrolisis That works to. When it comes to unsticking things though, theres literally hundereds of methods used (sarcastically speeking but practically) Its a non stop topic. But keep in mind with heat, you have to know what to heat and what NOT to heat. Like soft metals like bronze, brass, some copper, potmetal, some aluminum. Also depends on the situation at hand. Like i said, it's an endless topic but a heating torch and Kroil are just 2 from a long list. Another thing to keep in mind when unsticking things, remember, you are working with 2 very powerful enemy's rust absolutly cannot resist BUT keep in mind the thing your working on didnt get stuck over night eaither, meaning be patient (probably spelled that wrong) and be carefull and unstick things slow.
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Old 08-17-2008, 07:59 PM
David Cave David Cave is offline
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Default Re: Restoration of a fully seized and rusted engine

Thanks Bud and R.F.
The engine is a complete Waterloo, hope I can get parts. Although it's complete some parts are beyond repair (mainly timing gears).
Once I get it apart, beyond the obvious bearings, races, etc. are there pieces I shouldn't sandblast? I would like to keep it as original as possible, most nuts and bolts are well rusted but in tact, should I replace them or can I reuse them? Should I paint piece by piece or after I put it back together?
You can see I'm new at this!
Dave
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Old 08-17-2008, 09:04 PM
Motormowers Motormowers is offline
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Cool Re: Restoration of a fully seized and rusted engine

Three things that have worked for me.

1. LOTS of patience
2. Common sense when loosening/removing parts
3. A damn good penetrating oil. And Im not talking garden variety junk thats on every store shelf west of the Pacos like Liquid Wrench or PBlaster. You can forget WD-40 unless you want to oil your screen door. Kroil has done everything but part the Red Sea for me. It even cures the common cold! (get real John ) Seriously, when the rust goes dry right after you spray P/O on thats a good thing. It means the metal has absorbed it like a sponge. Thats the whole idea with that stuff. And if you're drilling out a broken bolt/stud. Nothing keeps the bit cooler or makes it bite in like Kroil IMHO.
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Old 08-18-2008, 12:49 AM
Bud Tierney Bud Tierney is offline
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Default Re: Restoration of a fully seized and rusted engine

I wouldn't know a Waterloo engine if it fell on me, so I can't comment from experience...
Rusted nuts and bolts? In some non-fatal place (where failure wouldn't mean possible danger or engine damage) no real risk, but for moving parts?? Rust is insidious, sometimes being superficial, other times weakening the bolt or nut; I assume any testing (X-Ray? or whatever) too expensive to use.
Painting? Your call. Paint piece by piece and drop a wrench, or slip off a nut, and oops: repaint! But seeing what you've finished has a psychological boost in itself.
Sandblasting: If you haven't had a good deal of experience sandblasting, you'll be amazed at what a powerful stream of sand can erode, all too often in a place where you didn't want any erosion. As with the heat, beware softer metal parts and GO SLOW until you're sure of what's happening. It also requires meticulous cleaning afterward. Have fun!!
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Old 08-18-2008, 01:23 PM
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KeithW KeithW is online now
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Default Re: Restoration of a fully seized and rusted engine

Sounds like you are going to need lots of penetrating oil. Kroil is great but a bit pricey. Try a half and half mix of acetone and ATF. I think it works as well as Kroil but it is way less expensive.

Electrolysis is a great tool. Lots has been written on it so I won't go into details. I will free up amazingly rusted stuff.

If you can find a big container start with electrolysis of the entire engine for a week or two. Then hit it with the penetrating oil and start turning bolts and nuts.

keithw
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Old 08-18-2008, 05:15 PM
David Cave David Cave is offline
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Default Re: Restoration of a fully seized and rusted engine

Thanks Motormowers, Bud and Keith.
Lots of help there.
I'm not familiar with electrolysis, sounds to be a good thing. We are going on vacation for a couple of weeks, i'll surf the web for info. If anyone has a good site, please pass it along.

Dave
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Old 08-18-2008, 06:51 PM
Sky
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Default Re: Restoration of a fully seized and rusted engine

http://www.smokstak.com/forum/showth...t=electrolisis

I think that may be a good topic to have a look at. I didnt read the whole thing but looks pretty informing. Dont forget to do a search through the archives here on the stak. There's alot of good info just setting "idle" around here.
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Old 08-20-2008, 01:15 PM
David Cave David Cave is offline
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Default Re: Restoration of a fully seized and rusted engine

Nice thread.
I also found several web sites with how to info.

Thanks again.

Dave
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Old 08-27-2008, 05:35 PM
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Ray Cardoza Ray Cardoza is online now
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Default Re: Restoration of a fully seized and rusted engine

Works Really good to clean up rusty parts. I've done a lot and a lot of parts cleaning with the process and a wire brush on the grinder. Ive used it on whole engines to just the nuts/bolts. I even used it on the ignitor for my current project a 8cycle aermotor cleaned up with a wire brush and wiped things down then hit with a coat of primer so things dont rust up right away.
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