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Venn Severin, oil engine, Help needed


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  #1  
Old 02-20-2010, 01:29 AM
Bob Whitney Bob Whitney is offline
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Default Venn Severin, oil engine, Help needed

Last fall I purchased this; Venn Severin - ( Hothead ) oil engine - No 2595 - Type E - HP 9 - RPM 425 - Venn Severin Machine Co. - Chicago USA. At an auction, that was a trip and a half that was not listed in the flyer. Bore & stroke 6" x 9" est through the exhaust port?? Flywheel Dia 36" w/ 4" face - and stands 56" tall.
I need all the help I can get, to start with operating instructions??? I know, I have to light the fire, like hot tube ignition on oil field engines, which I have. Other than that I am at a loss?????
Thanks for the help
Bob
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Old 02-20-2010, 09:44 AM
Andrew Mackey Andrew Mackey is offline
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Exclamation Re: Venn Severin, oil engine, Help needed

I don't have specific info on your engine, but at the minimum you need to check the following:1) check the governor. There should be a counterweight mechanism mounted on one of the flywheels that control either the fuel pump stroke or the injector, thru a linkage. Make sure everything works freely. 2) make sure the fuel pump pumps fuel to the injector. 3) make sure the injector is clear and that when the fuel pump pushes the fuel, that it passes thru the injector. 4) make sure the hot head is in good shape, and that the interior of the head is not coked up with carbon. If it is coked up, ignition will be difficult, and the engine will be hard starting. 5) after making sure all linkages are free and working, and the head is clean, make sure that all excess fuel is removed from the combustion chamber. Excess fuel will vaporize as the engine accellerates, leading to a runaway condition unless fuel supply is cut off. Make sure you know how to stop the fuel pump. This is usually done with a lever somewheres on the engine that will depress the pump plunger and prevent it from pumping more fuel into the engine. the engine will use up the excess fuel, and then quit. If the engine has a compression release, you can also use it to stop the engine. 6) before starting, make sure the lubrication system is working. Make sure all grease cups turn and are loaded. It looks like the engine has a mechanical lubricater - make sure it has fresh oil in it, and that it is pumping on all ports. Mosr lubricaters have a manual arm with which you can turn the unit. Disconnect the oiling lines where they enter the engine and manually turn the oiler. Watch each line for oil. If all are working, good for you. Typically these oilers use SAE 50 NON Detergent oil. A guesstimate would be 6 to 8 drops / minute for crank and con rod bearings, and 6 to 10 drops/ minute for the piston/wristpin. If the engine uses oil in the crankcase, there should be some kind of oil level device, wether it be sight glass or a petcock. If forced oiling, there should also be a drain on the bottom of the crankcase.

In any case, make sure everything moves, does not bind , and moving parts are well lubricated, before attempting to start. To start, heat the hot head for at least 5 minutes. Give the fuel injecter one pump for priming, NO MORE! You should see white smoke come out the exhaust. If there is no smoke, wait another 5 minutes and try again. Then give the flywheels a yank AGAINST the direction you want the engine to turn, and it should fire and start in the direction you want it to go. If it rocks back and reverses, hold the fuel pump in the depressed position and let the engine coast to a stop. On its last compression stroke, give the pump a prime, when the engine is coming up against compression, and it should start. Make sure you can reach the compression release or the pump stop lever, so you can stop the engine in an emergency. Last but not least, make sure the engine is bolted down to a good skid or the floor before starting. You don't want the engine wandering around!
Andrew
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Old 02-20-2010, 11:51 PM
Bob Whitney Bob Whitney is offline
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Default Re: Venn Severin, oil engine, Help needed

Hi Andrew, Thanks for the reply. First I need to build a skid for the engine. I will take a closer inspection using your notes. I have some more close up pics, and I will try to explain more clearly the workings??? Just trying to get a head start on start up time.
1)The govenor mechanisum??? appears to advance and retard fuel pump timing?? I don't see any adjustment for fuel pump stroke.
2)The injector has no linkage, just an " L " handle screw with a point on the end that screws into the top of the injector; some kind of metering jet??? speed control???
3)Is there a way to check for coking in the hot head, with out removing the head??? I talked with one of the relatives at the sale and he said that they started it with a tractor. My first thought, is a hard starter???
4) Madison Kipp oiler Mod 50 ( 4 place ) One line to top main (oiler side ); two lines to ( fuel pump side ) main one on top and the other on the bottom; One that splits to both sides of the cylinder.
5) Rotation of running engine??? If I rotate the flywheel on the oiler side counterclockwise makes the oiler turn in the same direction when you manually crank the handle. Also makes the flywheel weights move against spring tention under power stroke??? Any thought here???
6) I have herd the stories about runaway engines, from the oil field guys; That is my biggest fear!!! Not being able to make an emergency shut down??? I know to shut the fuel off and close off the air intake. This engine has 2 air intakes one on each side of the crank case, with no means of closure.
Bob
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Old 02-21-2010, 11:47 AM
Andrew Mackey Andrew Mackey is offline
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Exclamation Re: Venn Severin, oil engine, Help needed

Bob,
I have the same Model 50 M-K oiler on my Charter-Mietz engine. Your manual crank on the oiler should have a drive that only allows the oiler to be cranked in one direction. Internally, there should be a ratchet assembly that turns the shaft in the same direction. Is the oiler driven by chain or gear, or does it turn with a lever driven with a cam? If it is directly driven by chain or gear, then that's the way the engine should turn. As I posted earlier, you want to make sure the oiler is delivering oil to all the ports. I had to totally rebuild mine, as it was left open to the elements, due to the engine being left outside for roughly 18 years! Make sure yours does not have any water in it, and that it turns easily all the way thru 4 turns without binding. DO NOT force it! Internal parts are made of Zinc, and break easily. There should be a drain on the case, drain out the oil if there are any doubts about quality of oil or if water is present.

You should not have to pull the engine completely thru compression, as I posted earlier. There should be some kind of primer lever.

The 'L' screw is the fuel adjustment, and when turned down completely should cut off fuel completely for shut down. Is there a compression relief valve anywheres? Should be one somwhere, either on the head or the cylinder.

Unfortunately, the only way to check for coking is to remove the head. For now, unless you have a definate starting problem, I would let it be, and not worry about it.

There may or may not be a way to choke the intake. My Charter-Mietz also has 2 air intakes, and you cannot stop the engine by plugging them. I have tried, and busted a lot of blood vessels in my hand, blocking one hole by hand. Don't try it! Besides the screw on the injecter, how is the fuel pump operated? Is there a manual lever to operate it (prime engine)?

Before starting, check the air intake passages. Are they just air admission spots for air to get into the base, or they cast passages into the block? If they just allow air to enter the base, when you mount the engine on a skid, you have to cover the base - this means mounting on a piece or two of 3/4" thick plywood, to effect a seal on the base.
At first start, block one of the inlet holes with a wooden plug. You might have a friend and a couple of 10 or 20 pound CO2 fire extinguishers on hand. Remove the nozzles and keep the extinguishers by the intake. If the engine runs away on the start, close the valve on the injecter and place the ends of the outlet on the extinguisher into the air inlet, and fire the exringuisher. This should smother the engine, without damage. DO NOT use dry chems, the dust will ruin the engine! With this method, you may let the engine burn off the excess, controlling the speed until the engine settles down. You will have to experiment with the screw setting until you get tie proper setting. I would try 1/8 turn out from bottomed , and back off 1/8 turn until the engine runs. Once the engine starts, I would turn off the injecter until the engine burns off the excess fuel, then open gradually. You might seek out an experianced oil engine man in your area, to help with the first start. It will take a while to gain experiance on how to operate your engine. Some more pictures of the fuel pump and oiler drive, as well as the cylinder and head from all 4 sides will also help.

Your model 50 oiler is an early version. It may have glass, or if real early, Isenglass (Mica) windows. You should be able to see the oil injecter pump drip rate thru the windows, and can view the oil flow as the shaft turns.

By the way, NICE looking engine!

Andrew
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Old 02-21-2010, 12:50 PM
David Babcock David Babcock is offline
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Smile Re: Venn Severin, oil engine, Help needed

Bob, years ago there was an article in gem by the former owner telling about that engine and others he owned at the time. I could try to find it if you like and tell you the issue? D. Babcock.
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Old 02-21-2010, 05:27 PM
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ListerDiesel ListerDiesel is offline
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Default Re: Venn Severin, oil engine, Help needed

There is a manual for the Madison-Kipp FD Model 50 lubricator on our websites:

http://www.stationary-engine.co.uk/M...adisonMenu.htm

or at

http://www.oldengine.oorg/members/di...adisonMenu.htm

Peter
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Old 02-22-2010, 01:50 AM
Bob Whitney Bob Whitney is offline
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Default Re: Venn Severin, oil engine, Help needed

Hi Andrew
1) My oiler has a oneway crank, and is belt driven. The belt is like a small screen door spring streched around the pullies from the crank to a side mount on the oiler. I belive there is a 90 degree drive inside??? The engine has always been inside, the crank turns freely and pumps oil. The engine was stiff to start with, but turn easy now. The oiler has windows and can see the oil drip, not sure of the material???
2) It dosen't have much compression, if I lean on the flywheel a little it will go through full compression. I don't see any compression release, could it have been in the location on the head that has been pluged, with what looks like a pice of pipe with the end welded shut. close up pic of the head 90 degrees from injector??? Let me guess, If there isn't enough compression to bounce back, going to be hard to hand start, or not at all???
3) Fuel pump primer; large hand lever above crank line, that will lean twards the center of engine. Right hand operation. " L " screw on the injector, fuel shut off and adjustment, that is what I thought. Good.
4) Have close up pic of primer handle, and the air inlet at the crank shaft line center of crank case. I am quite sure it is some type of reed valves. Will have to investigate air passages in the base, never thought of that???
5) Never thought about co2 fire extinguisher in the air inlet. That would work on 2 cycle oil field engines too. My home show ( Pioneer Power of West Branch, Mi ) we have about 2 dozen oil field engines desplayed at show time. 2 of them are mine, haven't had any problems, but a couple of co2's wouldn't hurt, Thanks for the idea, I am kind of a self appointed safty man. Have fun and don't get hurt.
6) I will try and get some better close up pic, or maybe its this vista program, pc will not talk to my camera or the scaner. Memery card from my camera works most of the time. Disgust in an understatement. This will give me lots to think about while I am building a skid.
Thanks
Bob
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Old 02-22-2010, 02:34 PM
Andrew Mackey Andrew Mackey is offline
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Exclamation Re: Venn Severin, oil engine, Help needed

As a semi diesel, the engine won't have the 18-20 to one that a regular diesel has. HOWEVER---It should have somewheres around 5 to 6 to one compression ration, and yes , it should bounce back on compression. If it just mushes thru, it sounds like the rings may be stuck, or there may be cylinder wear issues. The low compression may be why they used a tractor to start it. Only way to tell is to remove the piston and have a look at the cylinder and rings. All it might need is to have the rings freed up. Some carb cleanre, a brass or plastic mallet and some GENTLE tapping should have them loose in no time. If they are broken, or if there is cylinder damage - ??? Of course, you can also try to start with a pmy motor, but the engine will not run right, and probably will chuck oil all over the place. Can you see the rings thru the exhaust port? If you can, can you move them with a wide screw driver? If they are stuck, you cannot get compression. let us know.
Andrew
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Old 02-23-2010, 12:50 AM
Bob Whitney Bob Whitney is offline
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Default Re: Venn Severin, oil engine, Help needed

Hi Andrew
I have some more pics of the fuel pump and priming lever.
1) Maybe the compression is good. With the piston at BDC and pull the flywheel sharply it will turn about a quarter turn and bounce back. Yes I can see the rings through the exhaust port.
2) I removed the air inlet valves and there was lots of oil in the crank case at the parting line on the rod bearing, with piston at BDC. Yes there is a drain in the bottom of the crank case. Lube for the rod bearing goes through a collector ring and pipe to a cross hole drilled through the counter weight of the crank shaft. Must come from one of the lube lines that goes to the main bearing aera???
Thanks
Bob
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Old 02-23-2010, 01:01 AM
Bob Whitney Bob Whitney is offline
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Default Re: Venn Severin, oil engine, Help needed

Hi Dave
No I didn't see it, Yes, if you know the issue the article was in I would like to read it. Must have been back when I didn't have to read them all.
Thank you
Bob
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Old 02-23-2010, 01:20 AM
Bob Whitney Bob Whitney is offline
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Default Re: Venn Severin, oil engine, Help needed

Hi Pete
Thanks for the oiler sites, I will check them out when I have the time
Thanks going to U K
Bob
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Old 02-23-2010, 08:02 PM
Andrew Mackey Andrew Mackey is offline
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Exclamation Re: Venn Severin, oil engine, Help needed

Bob,
if the engine bounces back, it should have enough compression to start. On my C/M, heating the hot bulb for about 3 or 4 minutes (medium red heat)with a #7 Acetylene torch (NOT OXY-ACet.), priming the injector twice, rocking the crank against compression - opposite the direction I want the engine to run in, usually results in starting the engine. Spinning the engine backwards forces compression into the hot bulb. The fuel lights early, firing the charge. Usually the firing pulse is enough to carry the engine over the next compression stroke, and off it goes!

The biggest trick is to not overload the cylinder with fuel. If I flood the C/M, I hold the primer so that the fuel pump cannot operate. This allows the engine to burn off the excess fuel. Once the engine slows, the primer lever is released, and the engine runs normally. The welded shut pipe you mentioned earlier may have been for the compression release. I would replace it and install a gas cock with a large handle on it. You can use it in an emergency to dump compression, in case the engine runs away, just do not stand in front of it while it is open. Use a steel or iron body valve, as all brass valve may fail if it gets too hot.

As for the slinger on the crank, that is the same way the C/M crank pin gets its lube. Make sure that the split oil line supplying the piston gets oil evenly distributed on both sides from the oiler. If only one side gets oil, the other side of the piston will starve for oil, resulting in uneven cylinder wear and overheating of the piston rings. Is there an over fill drain on the block, to drain off excess oil in the case? It should drain down the oil level until the con rod just hits the oil at BDC. If not, just drain off the oil out the drain until flow slows, then shut. Oil will refill the case as the engine runs. Excess oil will be told by puffs of blue smoke as the engine is running, and possible run-ups in speed, as the excess oil ends up being burned as excess fuel. I let the C/M load up one day, believe you me, that SAE 50 let off such a smoke cloud, you could not see 2 feet, when it shot out the exhaust! I usually drain off the excess oil every time I run the engine.

Dave Preuhs had a website with info on the M/K oilers, he also rebuilds them. I believe he is here on the Stak. If you get the GEM, check out my article on my restoration of the C/M,(Vol 41, #7,8,and 9). In it I detail the operation and rebuilding of my model 50. Dave was a good source of info, and was very helpful, when I had questions. As long as all 4 oil lines are pumping, you should be OK.

Once the engine fires up, the heat on the hot bulb can be turned off. Heat from engine combustion , unlike a hot tube, will maintain enough heat to keep the engine running. The only way to stop the hot bulb engine is to shut off the fuel, either by holding down the primer lever so the pump will not function, or by turning off the adjuster on top of the injector.

Andrew
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Old 02-24-2010, 02:15 AM
Bob Whitney Bob Whitney is offline
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Default Re: Venn Severin, oil engine, Help needed

Hi Andrew
I have a South Penn Oil City, 20 HP, Hot Tube, Half Bread oil field engine. That I have been operating for the last 9 years. I belive the starting procedure will be about the same, except for the fuel and the fueling system??? I was wondering after start up, if it would run with out the torch lite??? I got the torch and a full 20 lb tank, that was used by the former owner. I thought it was an old style Propane tank, now you say Acetylene. So what is the torch fuel????
I checked the rings and they are all loose, but I have a double BUT here. There are 2 rings per grove ( 3/8 ea ) and 4 groves. All the rings aren't shiny, there are black sections, not sealing, blow by??? Not all lined up in the same location, or even in the same grove???? I will not be shocked if I need to do a ring job, but I will try and run it first.
I will look up Dave Preuhs article in GEM on M/K oilers. Definitely will check all lube lines for flow???
I have one more pic of the cylinder; There is a wooden plug in a broken off 1/4" pipe, with out a boss that goes into the water jacket. ( Maybe an after thought?? ) There is a 1/4" street elbow that is pluged with a boss that goes in the inlet port passage from the crank case. ( Factory ) Any thoughts here???? I have a lot of work to get done before start up???
Later
Bob
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Old 02-24-2010, 02:29 AM
Eric M. Eric M. is offline
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Default Re: Venn Severin, oil engine, Help needed

Acetylene, propane, doesn't matter. I would use propane myself, as it's much easier to come by, equipment for it is easier to find, it's cheaper, and less dangerous (both to the engine, and the operator). With propane, it will still throw out plenty of heat, but you won't run as much of a risk of overheating the bulb. Not to say you shouldn't keep a close eye on the bulb temperature, but there is less of a worry with propane. Anything that gets the bulb to the proper heat will work fine. Whether it's a gasoline blowtorch, kerosene blowlamp, propane torch, or whatever.
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Old 02-24-2010, 12:53 PM
Andrew Mackey Andrew Mackey is offline
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Exclamation Re: Venn Severin, oil engine, Help needed

BOB,
A hot TUBE fired engine needs heat on the hot tube full time. Propane would be the fuel of choice, as constant heat needs to be applied. A grill tank is the perfect supply for the hot tube, a 100 pound tank would be good for the engine supply. A grill tank will work short term, for engine supply, but it will ice up and fuel evaporative cooling will kill the supply in a short time. On the hot BULB fired engine, propane can be used on that one also, it just takes a little longer to get up initial heat. Once hot, the hot bulb retains heat from engine combustion, and the heat source can be shut off.

I am a plumber by trade, and Acetylene B tanks are readily available to me. In starting the C/M engine, I only use enough heat to allow the engine to start, and shut off the torch at the earliest opportunity, after the engine starts. With the C/M, 2 to 3 minutes maximum heat time. I watch the hot bulb thru a mirror, and when it reaches a dull red heat, pull the primer. I usually either get a large plume of white smoke, or an afterfire explosion out the exhaust! A quick pull on the flywheels, a shot with the primer, while the engine has the exhaust port closed, usually has it running in seconds. The torch is cut off as soon as the engine fires up. After shut down, the engine can be re-started for up to 6 minutes later without further heating!

As for your hot bulb engine, propane will work just fine on that as well, for heating the hot bulb, and starting. Again, once the engine starts, you can shut off the bulb heat source, as the engine's running will keep the bulb hot. Heat the bulb until you get it to a dull red heat, and then pull the primer lever. You should get a burst of white vapor out the exhaust. Pull the engine against the direction you want it to run in, against compression, pull the primer again, and it should fire itself up, just like the OC/SP.

As for start up prep, like I said in earlier posts, make sure all linkages are free and do not bind. Disconnect all oil lines where they meet the engine, and crank oiler. Oil should come out all ports. Make sure oil comes out of the piston oiling supply lines evenly. Make sure all cam and eccentric surfaces are clean and free of debris and burrs, also be sure they are oiled well. Make sure the fuel pump is delivering fuel to the injector reliably (checks not sticking). At first time starting, heat hot bulb for about 10 minutes, to burn off excess fuel and any critters that may have built a nest within. Try not to have excess fuel in the cylinder. Stand by with the CO2 extinguishers and by the decompression valve in case of a run away condition. If the engine is getting too much fuel, close the fuel valve until excess is burned off, and then open 1/8 turn an a time, until engine runs smoothly. Try starting the engine with the fuel adjuster 1/4 turn out, and adjust until there is no smoke. To kill engine, shut off fuel valve.

I use Kerosene for fuel, as it burns cleaner and makes less of a mess than #1 or 2 fuel oil. The C/M will run on fuel oil, but it smokes more, and smells worse!

Do you have the exhaust piping/muffler for the engine? I would not run it with an open exhaust port. An open exhaust would lead to a big temperature differential within the cylinder, and would make fuel metering more difficult, as the engine would tend not to scavenge properly. Even an exhaust pipe a couple of feet long would be better than none. The area of the pipe should be close to the area of the exhaust port.

As for the piping on the engine, my compression release is 3/8". 1/4" would not be out of line. A metal seat globe valve, ot a gas valve will work fine. Does the engine have a water pump for cooling circulation? If so, the piping off the head could either go to a screen type cooler or a barrel for return flow.

The cylinder probably has wear on it, the multiple rings should seal enough to run the engine. You might try putting some SEA-FOAM additive in the fuel, after you get the engine running. This product is available at a good auto supply, and will help free sticking rings.

keep us advised on your progress!
Andrew
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Old 02-25-2010, 01:47 AM
Bob Whitney Bob Whitney is offline
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Default Re: Venn Severin, oil engine, Help needed

Hi Andrew
The torch is propane; TURB O TORCH with a full tank, no regulator. That is what came with it. pic

Exhaust stack 4" pipe 3' long with a square 90 that screws into the flange, its at the horizontal now. But I will turn it up to lesson the noise and maybe some smoke rings???

Crank case oil level; one drain plug in the bottom only. Had to much oil in the crank case; Makes it smoke a lot and starts burning the oil as fuel, NOT GOOD

Cooling system; Like my SPOC, thermosiphon using a water tank with the water level above the the head, I also add a check valve in the bottom line, so the water will only flow in one direction.

SEA - FOAM; I will keep that in mind, but I don't think the rings are stuck??? Got pics of the rings. First one is top grove. Second one is the center 2 groves. The last one is the bottom grove. I think, ring contact is poor and I wonder what it is like where I can't see??? But I am going to give it a try the way it is first. As for 2 rings in a grove; I have been doing that for years. Also have lots of oil from playing with it yesterday.

Maybe I can start fabbing the engine skid this weekend??? Have I missed any thing, other that getting some work done on this end. I will keep you guys posted with my progress.
Thanks for all your help

Later
Bob
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Old 02-25-2010, 01:04 PM
Andrew Mackey Andrew Mackey is offline
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Exclamation Re: Venn Severin, oil engine, Help needed

Hot bulb heater looks like it should do the trick!

The ring pictures - it looks like the rings are flexing in the grooves, allowing them to rock. This allows the edges of the ring to make full time contact, not the center. This may allow a bit of blow by. I suspect that automotive rings were used, and that they are not sitting deep enough in the ring grooves to keep them stable The one ring with the dark section leads me to suspect that that ring is broken, as the dark end is not making contact with the cylinder wall, and has carboned up. What worries me is you cannot see if indeed the ring is broken. If it is, the broken end may be damaging the cylinder wall, putting a groove in it where the ring is snapped. Originally, an engine of that age would have had solid, deep and wide rings. Automotive rings will not fill the grooves properly, and would allow blowby gasses to escape behind the rings. This would overheat the rings and burn the grooves around them. Once you get the engine running, listen carefully to the exhaust. Compression should be quiet, and the exhaust note clean and barky, like the OC/SP Ypu should not hear blowby as the engine fires either.

Exhaust sounds like it should sound good!

Don't put the check in the cooling system. It will restrict flow too much (if not entirely), and it is not nescessary. Hot water rises, cooler water takes its place. Flow occurs naturally. The weight of the check may actually stop flow entirely, remember, water flow is not forced!

As an after thought, if this engine was re-ringed, and it has not seen much use, it could be that the rings have not fully seated, from new! Look carefully at the rings.. From the pictures, it seems that there are slight machining grooves still on some of the rings? Yes?? if so, these rings have yet to seat fully. Perhaps the engine just needs to be run with a load on it in order to fully seat the rings in.

Andrew

Last edited by Andrew Mackey; 02-25-2010 at 01:10 PM. Reason: xtra info
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  #18  
Old 02-25-2010, 11:22 PM
Bob Whitney Bob Whitney is offline
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Default Re: Venn Severin, oil engine, Help needed

Andrew
I think the rings are in the IFFY category??? They are 3/8" wide, 2 in a 3/4" grove. When I pull the flywheel into compression and hold it they leak easily, With the piston at TDC and the plug out of the air inlet port passage, I get more vacuum resistance than pressure build up in the crank case??? I presume these rings are pinned, like other 2 cycle engines I have had a part, so the end of the ring won't get broken off in the port???

The water temp on my SPOC after warmed up runs about 210 and will stay that way for 6 hrs or so and then start to clime. That means the water in the tank is all the same temp and can no longer cool the engine. The hot water pipe that comes out of the top of the engine, goes in the top of the water tank above the water line. With out a check valve there is no oneway flow or cooling. With out a check, the water in the tank would have to be above the hot water discharge pipe. If the water drops below the discharge pipe the cooling stops. On a good day run, I can loose a 1' or more of water???

Later
Bob
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Old 02-26-2010, 01:42 AM
ronm ronm is offline
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Default Re: Venn Severin, oil engine, Help needed

Reach into the port w/a small screwdriver or some such tool & press on the rings-a broken or stuck ring won't have any "spring" to it...this is right out of the Detroit Diesel book...
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Old 02-26-2010, 08:56 PM
Bob Whitney Bob Whitney is offline
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Default Re: Venn Severin, oil engine, Help needed

Hi Ronm
Thanks for your input.
I have already done the spring test, and they past. They move in and out, but I couldn't get any rotation, is good.
Bob
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