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Alternative Fuels An energy source alternative to using fossil fuels. Materials or substances that can be used as a fuel, other than conventional fuels. Waste oils, vegetable oils or animal fats, which can be used alone, or blended with fossil fuels.

Alternative Fuels

Any use for "Old Bad Gas"


Anyone ever find any use for Old Bad Gas? It would seem to me that it would still burn? Some kind...

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  #1  
Old 10-31-2010, 07:48 PM
oldiron22 oldiron22 is offline
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Default Any use for "Old Bad Gas"

Anyone ever find any use for Old Bad Gas? It would seem to me that it would still burn? Some kind of furnace ? any way to refine it?With the cost of gasoline today there should be use's for it? Thanks
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Old 10-31-2010, 08:32 PM
Rod Fielder Rod Fielder is offline
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Default Re: Any use for "Old Bad Gas"

My old lady say's i have old bad gas. She's got no use for me
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Old 10-31-2010, 08:43 PM
mschreiber mschreiber is offline
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Default Re: Any use for "Old Bad Gas"

don't soak parts in it over a period of time. somehow puts a nasty coating on the stuff.
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Old 10-31-2010, 08:48 PM
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Default Re: Any use for "Old Bad Gas"

Years ago I had a 1937 John Deere D... Burnt lots of Old Stale Gas in it and a Few Mistakes when some guy put Diesel in his Gasoline Car/Pickup.... Never Hurt the Tractor either....
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Old 10-31-2010, 09:45 PM
Arlie Levy Arlie Levy is offline
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Default Re: Any use for "Old Bad Gas"

Just mix it a little at a time with good gas and use it up that way. It works for me with no problems.
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Old 10-31-2010, 11:58 PM
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Default Re: Any use for "Old Bad Gas"

I just put the 'old bad gas' in my 'Bad Old Engines' and use it up.

Having lost most of it vapors, it isn't as explosive as fresh gas, but burning slower smooths out a jumpy hit & miss when you're running them slow. In a car, truck, or tractor, once it gets drawn through the carb & intake it's pretty well atomised and becomes explosive again even if the vapors are gone.

I've also mixed a gallon or so at a time in with 10 gallons of fresh gas in my daily driver car (2003 Ford Escort) with No Ill Results.

I've drained the gas out of vehicles I scrapped out that hadn't been run in 10 years or more and used it in my tractor.

After finally getting around to rebuilding the distributer in my 37 Ford truck that sat for 14 years with a 1/4 tank of gas in it, it fired right up and I drove it 4 miles to the nearest gas station to add a couple gallons of new gas to it.

Bought a 51 Ford sedan 10 years ago that had been parked in 1979. The engine was lightly seized, but after rocking it back & forth, it free'd up, I cleaned the points, dribbled a little gas in the carb to prime it, and it fired right up and ran like a sewing machine on the 21 year old gas that smelled like old varnish. I drove it around the yard and smoked the tires in the driveway running on that 'old bad gas'.

Other than letting it set for a day or so to see if any water seperates out of it after I drain it from a tank, once I syphon off the water (if there was any), I've never had any problems running it in anything I own.

If your ignition is Ok, there's no reason why it shouldn't fire in an engine, even if it barely burns throwing matches in a puddle of it. Been There, Done That ! Many many times over the years.

If you're afraid to use it in your car, it also works good for burning tree stumps, or anything else you want to light up faster. Without the vapors, you don't get the big Kaa-Whoooosh when you throw the match on it, it just lights up good like diesel or kerosene.
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Old 11-01-2010, 04:30 AM
Andrew Mackey Andrew Mackey is offline
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Exclamation Re: Any use for "Old Bad Gas"

If the stale gas will burn, it still has problems. It leaves a coating that eventually will restrict gas flow thru jets and passages. When it enters the engine, it will leave deposits in the surface of the intake passage and the intake valve. This material will cause stiction of the intake valve, and especially with small engines, could cause the valve stem to bind in the bore of the valve guide. In engines with aluminum guides, this could cause galling of the guide bore, thus ruining the guide and valve stem. I have also seen cylinder damage from continued use of stale fuel, especially in larger horsepower aluminum block engines (5 HP and larger).

Gas stored in an unsealed or partially filled container will lose 50% of its burning capability within 30 days. This includes fuel cans and engine gas tanks. The new fuels use componants that absorb water from the atmosphere as well, not nescessarily just alcohol either.

I do not recommend using fuel more than 45 days old, due to the ill effects. Dilution will make it burn, but the decayed stale fuel componants still exist and will still leave the same deposits over long term use.
Best way to get rid of it - put it in a container and take it to a disposal site where it can be sent to a place that will incinerate it safely.
Andrew
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Old 11-01-2010, 05:29 AM
Roland Hayes Roland Hayes is online now
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Default Re: Any use for "Old Bad Gas"

Bottle it and sell it as home made wine, will probably be better than some of the stuff out there!
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Old 11-01-2010, 08:31 AM
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Default Re: Any use for "Old Bad Gas"

I use old fuel that I remove from equipment in the spring to kill off weeds that come up in the gravel driveway.
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Old 11-01-2010, 09:02 AM
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Default Re: Any use for "Old Bad Gas"

If someone has a use for old gasoline, i have about 50 gallons in a tank here at my house....
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Old 11-01-2010, 09:16 AM
JBdairy JBdairy is offline
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Default Re: Any use for "Old Bad Gas"

Why take the chance to use old gas at all? Sure it may work but to save a few bucks is just not worth it. It also seems like the ethanol promotes bacteria growth that plugs up everything if it sits in a tank for a few years. The gas of years ago didn't do this. It just turned to a varnish type liquid that would still burn. Also the old gas had a higher volatility then todays gas. Todays gas doesn't go whoooosh when you light it like the old gas did.
I think Andrew has the right idea.
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Old 11-01-2010, 09:49 AM
HBurk HBurk is offline
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Default Re: Any use for "Old Bad Gas"

Sarg is right. Weed killer in fence rows, etc.
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  #13  
Old 11-01-2010, 10:11 AM
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Default Re: Any use for "Old Bad Gas"

John, you can bring those 50 gallons over when you pick up your engine. All I ever use it for is to start brush fires. Bad gas seems to stink too bad for anything else. I've spent to much time over the years draining it out of stuff to ever put it in anything that I want to run.
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Old 11-01-2010, 11:06 AM
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Default Re: Any use for "Old Bad Gas"

I might just do that...
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Old 11-01-2010, 02:02 PM
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Default Re: Any use for "Old Bad Gas"

I do the same as Ken mentioned. I too have a D JD that burns that old fuel just as fast if not faster than brand new gas. I have a steady stream of old gas coming from family and friends that want to get rid of the old gas from lawn mowers, motorcycles and such. It will still start even when it smells like paint thinner. The old gas does require a higher load and idle needle setting in order to run properly. The most important thing to do when using old gas is run the gas out of the carb and drain the gas completely in the winter or if the tractor sits idle for more than a month. Some old gas will have water in it and water does not burn when it goes in with the fuel normaly. I let the old gas stand a week and then pump out the upper 90-95% of the fuel into another fuel tank to make sure that water does not get in the fuel tank. One final note is if the tractor wont start mix in new fuel and it will start. I have found that really bad gas is easier to get the tractor started with a 50/50 mix of old and new. I would not use that old gas in newer engines though...
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Old 11-01-2010, 02:35 PM
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Default Re: Any use for "Old Bad Gas"

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrew Mackey View Post
...Gas stored in an unsealed or partially filled container will lose 50% of its burning capability within 30 days. This includes fuel cans and engine gas tanks. The new fuels use componants that absorb water from the atmosphere as well, not nescessarily just alcohol either...Andrew
So by those calculations, just how much burning capability did the 1/4 tank of gas in my 37 Ford lose over 14 years setting in a building with a dirt floor and lots of condensation.

It started up and ran just fine, and also ran normal on the 4 mile drive to the gas station. That was 3 years ago running on a mixture of 1992/1993 gas. I've been hearing people complaining about their engines not running on two month old gas since the mid 1970s, but I have yet to run into a problem with it. I also haven't touched the carburator at all on the 37 Ford since I rebuilt it in 1978 so if the old gas is plugging it up, it's simply amazing how well it still runs.

As for newer gas being even worse, this spring when I stripped the remains of an old crewcab dually down to the frame that I'm keeping for a future project, I removed both tanks, one of which I'd been syphoning gas out of occasionally for 8 years for the lawn mower, and the other which still had 3 gallons in it. I removed the tanks, stood them on end and stuck a syphon hose down in the lowest corner to remove every last drop and found less than 1/4 cup of water from 38 years of condensation in a 1972 truck tank. I poured off as much of the gas as I could until the water started mixing in as I poured the last couple pints, and used the 2 3/4 gallons of 8+ year old gas in my loader tractor loading the truck parts on my trailer and moving other parts around. By the way.... that crewcab dually had been in a barn fire and had the filler caps burned off, so the filler necks were wide open vented to the atmosphere and still had less than 1/4 cup of water in them.

You can do what ever you want with your old gas, but me.... at $2.85-$3.00 a gallon, I use it and have no problems with it.

My loader tractor either has a bad problem with condensation, or just had a lot of water in the tank when I bought it, because I have had to remove the sediment bowl and/or drain the float bowl several times, but that was also when I using fresh gas in it. Right now I have the line unhooked and run into a small garden tractor tank until I get around to removing the tank and cleaning it out good, but I've run the old gas in it in the small tank with no filter at all, and haven't noticed any difference in how it runs on that or the new stuff.

Just my 2 cents worth, based on my own personal experiences over many many years.
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Old 01-16-2011, 08:18 PM
Seafarer12 Seafarer12 is offline
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Default Re: Any use for "Old Bad Gas"

Like it has been said it makes a good weed killer. Works for getting brush fires going and can cut it with waste oil in a waste oil heater. There are all kinds of uses for it but I don't run it in any of my engines.
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Old 01-16-2011, 11:21 PM
Bill Sherlock Bill Sherlock is offline
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Default Re: Any use for "Old Bad Gas"

Poured some old ethanol gas on some empty paper bags from a dust control chemical in a burning barrel. Then tossed in a burning paper towel. The paper towel nearly burned itself out before the gas ignited with a lazy flame. The gas from days gone by would have nearly lifted the barrel off the ground before the paper towel got past the brim of the barrel.

Bill
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Old 01-17-2011, 12:30 AM
Turbo-T Turbo-T is offline
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Default Re: Any use for "Old Bad Gas"

My lawnmower gets it all. It even runs on old Coleman lantern fuel.
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Old 01-18-2011, 01:23 PM
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Default Re: Any use for "Old Bad Gas"

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Sherlock View Post
Poured some old ethanol gas on some empty paper bags from a dust control chemical in a burning barrel. Then tossed in a burning paper towel. The paper towel nearly burned itself out before the gas ignited with a lazy flame. The gas from days gone by would have nearly lifted the barrel off the ground before the paper towel got past the brim of the barrel.

Bill
That depends on how OLD the gas from days gone by was doing the same thing. I've had old gas drained out of cars and trucks that sat long enough it lit up slower than fuel oil, but it still ran perfectly fine in my engines. Once the vapors are gone, they don't don't explode violently in the open air whether is old regular or old ethanol, but once it's atomised drawing through the venturi, mixed with the incoming air, and compressed in the cylinder, it still explodes there and makes usable power.

Other than letting it set 1/2 hour or so to see if any water seperates out of it, and then syphoning off any that did, I still have No Problems at all using old gas drained out of something that's been setting for years. The Real Old stuff I use in the lawn mower, but if it's 5-7 years old, INCLUDING 3-5 year old ( maybe even older in some cases) Ethanol, I have no problems at all running it in my cars & trucks & tractors, sometimes diluted with fresh gas and sometimes running the old stuff straight as found. I've scrapped out over 40 cars in the past 25+ years, and have always used the fuel I drained out of them. Only the oldest most fowl smelling varnish gets thrown on the burn pile, but I've even run some of that just to prove I could.

My 37 ford that sat for 14 years, I never drained the old fuel out of, I just ran it as is for an hour or so at home until I drove it to the station 4 miles away to add a few gallons more.

My 51 Ford I never drained the varnished up 1979 gas out of when I bought it and got it running again in 2000. I drove it around the yard a few times with the 21 year old gas (no brakes so I never went on the road with it), started it up and moved it several times, put in winter storage and got it out again the next spring and moved it around the yard a few more times on the then 22 year old gas and sold the car that summer without ever draining the tank or adding new gas to it. That stanky old stuff probably wouldn't have done anything if I threw matches directly in the tank, but it still ran in the car.
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