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Steam Stationary Engines, Traction Engines, Steam Boats

1914 Case 40 HP Steam Engine Progress


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  #1  
Old 09-29-2011, 10:00 PM
Beatles65 Beatles65 is offline
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Default 1914 Case 40 HP Steam Engine Progress

I am going to use this thread to keep everyone informed about the progress of my 1914 Case 40 HP Road Roller/Traction engine.

Today I had the chance (Finally!) to start cleaning off the engine. I ran a few lengths of hose down to the engine to clean off all the dirt that it gathered on its trip up to my house. I took out all the hand holes and ran water through the boiler. It sure is dirty in there! How do you all get your boilers cleaned out so well? There is so much scale and other stuff that is everywhere! It doesn't come out with the water either, it just sits at the bottom of the mud ring.

I will have to get some more hand-hole gaskets, unless, is it possible to reuse the old ones if there is no damage to them?

Thanks for the Replies!

Happy Steaming!
From Denton, Nebraska.
Andrew Kean
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Old 09-29-2011, 10:04 PM
Reeves1917 Reeves1917 is offline
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Default Re: 1914 Case 40 HP Steam Engine Progress

Have you used a pressure washer that works or if you can make your self a little rake (small piece of steel and a small rod) that works to clean out the bottom of the boiler. Hope this helps.

John
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Old 09-29-2011, 10:30 PM
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Default Re: 1914 Case 40 HP Steam Engine Progress

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I will have to get some more hand-hole gaskets, unless, is it possible to reuse the old ones if there is no damage to them?
I would recommend new ones!

David
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Old 09-30-2011, 08:45 AM
Brad Kelley Brad Kelley is offline
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Default Re: 1914 Case 40 HP Steam Engine Progress

Use your hose and try to chase all the scale toward one hand hole/corner, then keep the water running pushing the debris that way and reach in the hand hole where all the scale is collecting and start pulling it out by hand. You'll probably get buckets full of crud out before you're done. A pressure washer works okay to break the scale off the boiler plate, but you really need high volume to wash the crud out the holes. A fire hose would be real nice!

I'd recommend "Topog-e" gaskets, but other folks like to cut their own out of sheet rubber.
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Old 10-10-2011, 01:10 PM
Beatles65 Beatles65 is offline
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Default Re: 1914 Case 40 HP Steam Engine Progress

I spent the weekend cleaning out the boiler and got most all of the scale and other crud out of it. I think I am ready to put the hand holes back on.

I also cleaned off the platform and fuel bunkers. There was lots of buildup in those bunkers. I scraped a bucket full of crud from the floor! There was also old wood that had been sitting and rotting in the right bunker and in the left bunker some coal and other trash.

It looks a lot better now that I have washed the engine off and gotten that platform cleaned.

I sure am looking forward to firing the engine!

Happy Steaming!
From Denton, Nebraska.
Andrew Kean
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Old 10-10-2011, 01:12 PM
Beatles65 Beatles65 is offline
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Default Re: 1914 Case 40 HP Steam Engine Progress

Here are some more pictures.

Enjoy!
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Old 10-10-2011, 01:17 PM
Beatles65 Beatles65 is offline
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Default Re: 1914 Case 40 HP Steam Engine Progress

I am trying to find out what the valve on the right is in this picture. I know that the one on the left is the pop-off valve, but what is the other one used for? Is it a manual safety valve?

Thanks for the help!

Happy Steaming!
From Denton, Nebraska.
Andrew Kean
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Old 10-10-2011, 01:56 PM
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Default Re: 1914 Case 40 HP Steam Engine Progress

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I am trying to find out what the valve on the right is in this picture.

It is just another safety valve. It's possible that it is the original safety valve, and since it could not be set and sealed, the boiler inspector had the previous owner install a modern safety valve.

I expect the new safety valve is set at a pressure just under that of the old valve.

Both your old and new safety valves can be operated manually.

David
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Old 10-10-2011, 05:41 PM
Jeff Smith Jeff Smith is offline
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Default Re: 1914 Case 40 HP Steam Engine Progress

"I expect the new safety valve is set at a pressure just under that of the old valve."

Why would it not be the opposite so the old valve is lower and utilized all of the time? That is the way I have seen it done on many engines.

Thank you.
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Jeff
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Old 10-10-2011, 05:59 PM
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Default Re: 1914 Case 40 HP Steam Engine Progress

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Why would it not be the opposite so the old valve is lower and utilized all of the time?
I've seen it done both ways. And, I've known instances where inspectors don't want any non-code safety valve on an engine, even as a back-up.

In the end, I suppose it is up to the discretion of your state boiler inspector.

David
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Old 10-10-2011, 07:09 PM
Robert M Robert M is offline
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Default Re: 1914 Case 40 HP Steam Engine Progress

Andrew, In your post number 5 you state that you have "most" of the crud and junk cleaned. Rule number 1 in my book, until you have clean running water running out of all the hand-holes you still have work to do! Get the front end of your boiler up higher than the rear, start at the fill plug and wash down the top of the tubes the best you can, then move to the smoke box and continue to wash. After you have those two complete go to the rear of the boiler and wash down the top of the crown sheet/or boiler top and then if necessary make a little, flexible, copper tube and wash off the top of the firebox door. Now move on down to the bottom four handholes and continue to wash until the water is running clean, still crud? Start over.

Someone suggested to me one time to get the fire dept to come out and flush out the boiler, well in small town Denton Nebr. you may be able to get that done, that would be great. Otherwise keep having fun with the garden hose.

PS, don't forget to wash out each flue just before winter along with the above. Have fun!
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Old 10-10-2011, 09:14 PM
Jim Conte Jim Conte is offline
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Default Re: 1914 Case 40 HP Steam Engine Progress

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Originally Posted by Beatles65 View Post
It sure is dirty in there! How do you all get your boilers cleaned out so well? There is so much scale and other stuff that is everywhere! It doesn't come out with the water either, it just sits at the bottom of the mud ring.
Andrew Kean
Andrew, lots of good advice has been posted, and I agree with all of it. In addition:

If you have ( not really If, most certainly you have ) scale that is stuck on to the boiler plate and tubes, and especially where you cannot see or reach to clean,

Scale holds moisture, oxygen and concentrated salts in contact with boiler metal, even when the boiler appears ' dry '.
Get rid of the scale and you get rid of the leading causes of corrosion.

Plain neutral pH 7 water is like steaming with acid in your boiler.
Boilers need to have a Basic pH of around 10 on the 1 to 14 scale to have maximum life and be resistant to corrosion.

Too much Alkali in boiler water can cause Caustic stress corrosion cracking. Even good old fashioned Soda Ash and Corn starch from the 1890's can cause Too Much of a Good Thing.
If using Alkali, a " P " Alkalinity test should be performed daily, along with a bottom blowdown. This keeps alkalinity under control and blows out the soft sediment from treatment before it bakes on as scale.

A modern water treatment will not use Alkali, it uses Amines, which cannot go Caustic ( too high in pH ). It is self regulating and automatic. No testing is needed. It cleans your boiler by simple steaming and circulation of the treated water as it protects your boiler from further scaling and corrosion. It also reduces foaming and wet steam. Regular use maintains a protective chemical film on the boiler metal, even when the boiler is dry.
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Old 10-10-2011, 10:39 PM
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Ted Knack Ted Knack is offline
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Default Re: 1914 Case 40 HP Steam Engine Progress

The one thing I dont agree with is the washing of the inside of the flues.If the flues have soot in them when you use water it turns into mud inside the flu.And doesnt dry out.I would first run the flue cleaner thru and then use air pressure to blow the loose soot out of the flue.I had that happen to me on a engine that I was running for someone else.I asked the guy did you clean the flues before you put the engine away and he said he did.But we were having a problem getting any steam.So I asked him again and he said he used the water hose.Get the flue cleaner and you couldnt believe the mud in the flues.So I keep the flues dry.
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Old 10-11-2011, 03:11 AM
Mike McKnight Mike McKnight is offline
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Smile Re: 1914 Case 40 HP Steam Engine Progress

I agree, if you feel compelled that you have to use anything "wet" on the flues let it be an oil-soaked rag, NOT water. Also, if you use oil, don't use used motor oil, as it contains acids in it that will harm your tubes, not help!

I had several inches of scale in the mud legs and bottom of the barrel in my Case when I bought it, you can read about how I cleaned it out here, complete with another "Boiler Saver Infomercial":

http://www.smokstak.com/forum/showthread.php?t=35702

Truth be told, am thinking of getting some water treatment myself for my Huber, as I've washed BUCKETS of scale out of it, and the previous owners washed buckets out of it too....and it's still steaming pretty hard!

I too would second new hand-hole gaskets. Compared to the cost of a steamer, they're pretty darn negligible. Blowing a hand-hole gasket out is not something you really want to do on your first steaming....lot of unnecessary stress on a new engineer! I would STRONGLY suggest for a first time steaming, (and for many times afterwards, until you get REAL comfortable in what you're doing) that you get a seasoned, knowledgable engineer in to help you and instruct you on what to do and look over your shoulder and give you a hand in case anything goes wrong. I remember an early steaming when I had a check valve stick open on an injector line going into my boiler-I turned off the injector and it just kept spraying steam out onto the ground. I was about panicing until it occurred to me what was going on, and was able to shut off the angle valve and stop the steam spraying out. I didn't have any engineer around to help me, nor anyone else around in case something went wrong. Don't do this!

After you get comfortable in running your engine, I still recommend getting someone in, doesn't have to be an engineer though, to be around when you're steaming, just in case something goes wrong and you either need help, or to call in some help. Just makes good sense!

Another thing you may or may not have thought of, I know you're going to be itching like crazy to steam up your new engine at the first opportunity, but it's a good idea to pull the piping loose and examine the first nipples that go into the boiler. I did this last year on my Huber, at the insistence of the state inspector, and an older seasoned operator, and found that what was there was pretty dog-gone threadbare and needed replacing. If you're fired up with a blazing hot fire and a really thinned out nipple going right into the boiler breaks, you've suddenly got a big source of steam and hot water spraying out everywhere and no way to contain it, and nothing to do but drag the fire out or smother it. (If the nipple should break on the backhead of the boiler, you're screwed!)

Have seen a plug come out of the bottom of a water-bottom boiler, and it didn't take but about five minutes to empty the boiler of water COMPLETELY. The owner/operator was able to drag the fire out of the firebox and get the heat off the crownsheet before it could do any damage to the boiler...but it was exciting! Trust me, you DON'T want THAT.

Steam can be downright DANGEROUS if not handled properly. Am not trying to scare you or discourage you-but like an old timer told me one time, "Enjoy the ride, but ride safe!" He wasn't talking about steam engines, though......

I know how you're probably feeling-I was 21 yrs old once and just bought my first steam engine, and couldn't wait to steam it up! Enjoy the engine-as they sure are enjoyable to run-but play it safe, and it's even more enjoyable. Get hurt, and it loses the enjoyment!

Mike M
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Old 10-11-2011, 08:42 AM
Pete LaBelle Pete LaBelle is offline
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Default Re: 1914 Case 40 HP Steam Engine Progress

Take a look at your garden hose spigot at your house. I have city water, and noticed one day that if I had the front yard hose running full, then opened the back yard hose full, there was no drop in flow at the front yard.

Standard garden hose spigots, although 3/4" pipe, have in fact a small hole where the actual shut-off is.

A trip to Lowes found a full flow 3/4" ball valve with male garden hose threads on one end. I replaced my old valve with this one (and had to replace an inside valve as well for the same reason). Verify all valves all the way back to your water source. I can now open the valve fully and shoot a raw stream of water out of my hose, pointed at 45 degrees to the sky, about 10-12' across the lawn!

Makes flushing my boiler each season much easier.

Notice we use the word "flushing" frequently in these threads? Just like a toilet, you need a lot of water to accomplish this.

Oh...and......when I brought my engine home after setting idle for 45+ years, in a couple hour's time, I flushed out 3 5-gallon buckets of scale out of my boiler, so your's isn't any different.

Keep asking questions ! Lots of answers on this site to be had !

Pete
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Old 12-04-2011, 09:33 PM
Beatles65 Beatles65 is offline
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Default Re: 1914 Case 40 HP Steam Engine Progress

Hello everyone!

It has been a while since I have posted on the 1914 Case 40 HP Steam engine.

Here is what has happened so far.

I had some knowledgeable Steam guys that I know through the Camp Creek Threshers Club come out and look over the steam engine to tell me what I needed to do before I could fire it up. They told me that the Water Jacket needed to come off and the piping needed to be replaced as it was old galvanized Schedule 40. Once I get all the water jacket and pipes off we will plug all the holes on the boiler and do a hydrostatic test to check for leaks. Once that is done I will put all new piping on.

Being a student in College, I have been busy with classes and work and hadn't been able to do any work on the engine until today! Boy it sure was fun! I started to take off the Jacket and the piping. I still have more to do, but I am enjoying every minute of it.

Here are some pictures of today progress.

Enjoy!
From Denton, Nebraska.
Andrew Kean
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Working on the Case Steam Engine Photo 1.jpg   Working on the Case Steam Engine Photo 2.jpg   Working on the Case Steam Engine Photo 3.jpg   Working on the Case Steam Engine Photo 4.jpg  
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Old 12-04-2011, 09:39 PM
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Default Re: 1914 Case 40 HP Steam Engine Progress

Here are some more pictures!

From Denton, Nebraska.
Andrew Kean
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Working on the Case Steam Engine Photo 5.jpg   Working on the Case Steam Engine Photo 6.jpg   Working on the Case Steam Engine Photo 7.jpg   Working on the Case Steam Engine Photo 8.jpg  
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Old 12-04-2011, 09:42 PM
Beatles65 Beatles65 is offline
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Default Re: 1914 Case 40 HP Steam Engine Progress

And one more!

From Denton, Nebraska.
Andrew Kean
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Old 01-15-2012, 12:14 AM
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Default Re: 1914 Case 40 HP Steam Engine Progress

Today I spent the day working on the 1914 Case Steam Engine. I was able to get the rest of the Boiler Jacket off, as well as the wood underneath. I have removed most of the old plumbing so I can put new on when the time comes. The boiler looks to be in good shape form what I can see on the outside after taking off the jacket. All the wood that came off was still in great shape, there weren't any that were rotten. I love being able to see the entire boiler, all those rivet's look so cool, and there all in pretty good shape too.

I want to paint the engine and was wondering what others have done to remove the old paint and grease from everything. I was thinking that spraying cans of oven cleaner on the engine might work, or even just pressure washing it to clean off the majority of buildup. What do you think?

When the time comes to paint the engine, what color should the different parts be?

What kind of paint does one use on the boiler? I imagine something that is heat tolerant, so it won't burn off. Also what are the paints to use on the rest of the engine?


Thanks for the help everyone!
From Denton, Nebraska.
Andrew Kean
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Case Steam Engine with out Jacket Photo 1.jpg   Case Steam Engine with out Jacket Photo 2.jpg   Case Steam Engine with out Jacket Photo 3.jpg   Case Steam Engine with out Jacket Photo 4.jpg  
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Old 01-15-2012, 12:22 AM
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Default Re: 1914 Case 40 HP Steam Engine Progress

Some more pictures from today. A few side shots as well as some pipe and valves.

Enjoy!

Andrew Kean
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Case Steam Engine with out Jacket Photo 5.jpg   Case Steam Engine with out Jacket Photo 6.jpg   Case Steam Engine with out Jacket Photo 7.jpg   Case Steam Engine with out Jacket Photo 8.jpg  
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