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Buzzacot Farm Pumper Rebuild


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  #41  
Old 01-07-2016, 11:48:31 PM
cobbadog cobbadog is offline
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Default Re: Buzzacot farm pumper rebuild

Here is another couple of options;

Rally Badges, email Greg@RallyBadges.com.au or www.RallyBadges.com.au

Don Reid of Vintage engine Spares, on the Gold Coast. 07 3200 5382.

PS. John Humphries is Rustic Spares.
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  #42  
Old 01-10-2016, 08:08:41 PM
muzzery muzzery is offline
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Default Re: Buzzacot farm pumper rebuild

This past weekend, I removed the old broken carburetor, which was a bit of a mission, I had a 4 foot pipe on the stiltsons to turn it, as gently as possible.
So this means I need to look at making the fuel tank and replacement carby beautiful next. What do i need to do to the carby? Just clean it out? It has very little to it, so I guess it just works!
I slapped a little colour on the crankcase etc, and fixed the timing cover on as well.
Two years ago, I bought a brand new pair of valve springs from USA, on ebay. I went to grab them Saturday, and one is missing... thanks kids. so,, there's another set in the mail from usa. grr
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  #43  
Old 01-10-2016, 11:50:44 PM
cobbadog cobbadog is offline
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Default Re: Buzzacot farm pumper rebuild

Looking great so far. with the 'fuel mixer' not carby it is as you described, simple. It is just an adjustable needle and seat. The taper on the needle fits the taper in the body and that's it. With our Buzacott it only takes 3/4 of a turn from the off position, (screwed all the way to the bottom) to start and run. Sometimes I can back that off by 1/4 of a turn and it behaves nicely all day. When you make a gasket to fit between the tank and the mixer make sure there is a breather hole in the gasket. It took me a few hours to work out that the air was not getting into that tank and was not mixing air with fuel.
So just ensure that the hole where the needle goes is nice and clear and it is done.
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  #44  
Old 01-11-2016, 07:55:35 PM
Famous Fitter Famous Fitter is offline
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Default Re: Buzzacot farm pumper rebuild

Hi Muzzery
There is a fair chance i will have a grease cup of the same style as you need, i have a fair few of these pumpers in parts ,and have an identical WICO fired engine in original (good) unrestored condition in my colllection as well as a few others. I am over at Kingaroy ,not far from you .
Cheers Justin
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  #45  
Old 01-11-2016, 08:59:27 PM
Scotty 2 Scotty 2 is offline
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Default Re: Buzzacot farm pumper rebuild

Hello all
If you cannot find the greaser, the right size the greaser just behind the flywheel can be a different size. Nobody would notice at all. Just same sized ones everywhere else.
If it's any help and you cannot find the right greaser, I have a couple of 32mm (thread size roughly) greasers in the spares tin. They are a 1/4 water pipe thread where they screw into the engine.

The EK Wico version of pumper is not that common according to my research (please correct me if I'm wrong as I've been wrong on more then the odd occasion).
Justin helped me parts for ours a few years ago. He's a good bloke with a world of knowledge.

I've included some pictures of ours and a video so you know how yours will turn out.

Cheers Scott









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  #46  
Old 01-12-2016, 12:46:57 AM
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Mick Mick is offline
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Default Re: Buzzacot farm pumper rebuild

I have a spare left hand thread greaser that goes in the end of the crank for the bigend bearing if thats the one u require
Cheers Mick
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  #47  
Old 01-12-2016, 08:29:08 AM
muzzery muzzery is offline
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Default Re: Buzzacot farm pumper rebuild

Thanks everyone for all the advice. I have a greaser coming I the mail after tomorrow, from Greg at rally badges.cheers for that cobbadog. Famous fitter, cheers, Mick I already have that one thanks. Scotty2, those are great pics, very interesting, I have a copper fuel tank, which someone told me was incorrect, but I will run with that all the same.. The fuel mixer is slightly different to yours as well, although it came with the rank, so that's what I got.,
I slapped on a second coat of green tonight, and I was pretty chuffed with how it looks.
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  #48  
Old 01-15-2016, 12:00:00 AM
muzzery muzzery is offline
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Default Re: Buzzacot farm pumper rebuild

I was just reading back through all the great info in this post from other members. Thanks everyone you've been awesome.
One topic pricked my ears, using an electrolosys bath. I need to clean the flywheel, and this might be a good opportunity to experiment. I have a 12 volt transformer from a pretty old caravan, it might be good for the power supply. I just need a tub, anodes or cathodes or whatever, and electrolyte. This will be fun! (yeah I need to get out more...)
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  #49  
Old 01-15-2016, 05:23:38 AM
onetrack onetrack is offline
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Default Re: Buzzacot farm pumper rebuild

I've found that electrolysis baths are too dangerous for me. You need to have them well-ventilated because they produce hydrogen gas.

I frightened the living beejeezus out of myself by accidentally arcing a lead over a bubbling electrolysis bath, and it ignited the hydrogen it was producing, exploding it with a huge BANG!!
A real "brown corduroy trousers" moment, I can tell you!

Luckily, I had the bath outdoors (it was a 55 litre plastic storage crate) at the back of my shop - but it was enough to make me realise these style of treatment baths are downright dangerous.

I stick with citric acid. Nice and safe - a little slower in operation - but no real danger, and very effective. No problems if you have a spill - and even the residue isn't hazardous.

I use a cut-down IBC tank nowadays - cut down to about 2/3rds its height. I've got a big piece of galvanised plate to cover it to prevent evaporation.
The IBC tank is great because it allows you to soak big items, and it has a 50mm drain valve on it.

I put about 500-600 litres of water in it, with about 4kgs of citric acid powder (available in bulk at $5 kg, from Kakulas Bros store in Northbridge, or Kakulas Sister stores in Nollamara or Fremantle) - then I throw the item in, and leave it for a week or two, depending on the corrosion level.

I pull the item out and pressure-wash it - and if it needs more treatment, it goes back in again for another week or more.

The citric acid doesn't eat away any base metal (cast iron or steel), it doesn't eat away any non-ferrous metals - but you can't do baked enamel items, as the citric dissolves baked enamel like nothing you've ever seen.

Cheers, Ron.
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  #50  
Old 01-16-2016, 01:20:55 AM
cobbadog cobbadog is offline
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Default Re: Buzzacot farm pumper rebuild

For a big and portable tank you can use a sheet of thick builders plastic straight off the roll. Sit a couple of rows of bricks on top of each other and drop the plastic sheet into place and place more bricks on top to keep it in place. Now you make this any size that your plastic sheet comes in.
Yes they do give off a gas but if it is out in the open and no way of gases accumulating they are safe. Do not use stainless steel as an anode or cathode this is dangerous gas.
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  #51  
Old 01-16-2016, 05:26:16 AM
onetrack onetrack is offline
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Default Re: Buzzacot farm pumper rebuild

There is no dangerous gas produced from chrome or stainless steels in the solution.

The gas danger is hydrogen gas, caused by electrolysis (breakdown) of the water, which separates into oxygen and hydrogen.
Hydrogen is produced from electrolysis regardless of what is in the bath or tank.

The hydrogen is produced in enough quantity from even a small bath or tank to cause an explosion if it remains concentrated.
Gas removal via a fan or a strong breeze is the only way to ensure you don't get a hydrogen explosion.

The danger with chrome or stainless steel (some people use a stainless anode) in an electrolysis bath, is the production of hexavalent chromium.
Hexavalent chromium is a nasty carcinogen that is produced when stainless or chrome is electrolysed. It ends up in the solution.

There are arguments over whether enough hexavalent chromium is produced in an electrolysis bath to cause problems.

Some people reckon it's sizeable amounts and deadly - others reckon the amount produced is only small and of no concern.
Regardless, it is recognised that some hexavalent chromium is produced when electrolysis is used with stainless steel in the solution somewhere - so you're better off avoiding producing any of it.

That is why I prefer citric acid - it's safe, you don't have to fluff around with battery chargers, cables, anodes and cathodes - and you don't produce explosive gases.

Cheers, Ron.
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  #52  
Old 01-16-2016, 05:57:45 AM
ozfarm ozfarm is offline
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Default Re: Buzzacot farm pumper rebuild

Quote:
Originally Posted by onetrack View Post
I've found that electrolysis baths are too dangerous for me. You need to have them well-ventilated because they produce hydrogen gas.

I frightened the living beejeezus out of myself by accidentally arcing a lead over a bubbling electrolysis bath, and it ignited the hydrogen it was producing, exploding it with a huge BANG!!
A real "brown corduroy trousers" moment, I can tell you!

Luckily, I had the bath outdoors (it was a 55 litre plastic storage crate) at the back of my shop - but it was enough to make me realise these style of treatment baths are downright dangerous.

I stick with citric acid. Nice and safe - a little slower in operation - but no real danger, and very effective. No problems if you have a spill - and even the residue isn't hazardous.

I use a cut-down IBC tank nowadays - cut down to about 2/3rds its height. I've got a big piece of galvanised plate to cover it to prevent evaporation.
The IBC tank is great because it allows you to soak big items, and it has a 50mm drain valve on it.

I put about 500-600 litres of water in it, with about 4kgs of citric acid powder (available in bulk at $5 kg, from Kakulas Bros store in Northbridge, or Kakulas Sister stores in Nollamara or Fremantle) - then I throw the item in, and leave it for a week or two, depending on the corrosion level.

I pull the item out and pressure-wash it - and if it needs more treatment, it goes back in again for another week or more.

The citric acid doesn't eat away any base metal (cast iron or steel), it doesn't eat away any non-ferrous metals - but you can't do baked enamel items, as the citric dissolves baked enamel like nothing you've ever seen.

Cheers, Ron.
http://www.bigbubblemidland.com.au/raw_products.html

gud price on da acid, bro
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  #53  
Old 01-16-2016, 06:08:51 PM
muzzery muzzery is offline
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Default Re: Buzzacot farm pumper rebuild

I have had a good little bit of progress here, over the last couple of days.
I dismantled the fuel mixer, all looks good there, and cleaned ready to paint.
My fuel tank is copper, and i'm aware it's not correct for this engine, but that's what I have, so I think I'll give it a hit on the cloth buffer wheel, and maybe let it naturally develop "patina".
I have fit he rings to the piston, and bolted the cylinder jug on. I made a new gasket from paper, and gave the jug and muffler a couple coats of heatproof silver paint.
I got a name of a guy in Toowoomba through either rally badges, or rustic spares,(I cant remember which!) for a governor spring. He has some other bits and bobs for me as well, like valve spring nuts, and an "eye" cover for the front of the flywheel. He has also given me a connection for a good magneto, so it was a very productive conversation. I better start saving my pennies, as it isn't going to be cheap, but I have read enough on here to know the perils of eBay magnetos..
I have to say though, I'm feeling very optimistic and accomplished at the moment. I'm seeing the light at the end of the tunnel!
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  #54  
Old 01-17-2016, 12:05:48 AM
onetrack onetrack is offline
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Default Re: Buzzacot farm pumper rebuild

OzFarm - My price of $5 a kg for citric acid at Kakulas', still comes out better than any price per kg at Big Bubble!
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  #55  
Old 01-17-2016, 02:09:04 AM
cobbadog cobbadog is offline
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Default Re: Buzzacot farm pumper rebuild

Looking great muzzery!
You can see the shape of the original gasket that goes under the fuel mixer. It shows you that the gasket does not cover immediately around the hole where the pick up tube fits. This is where the air comes in to mix with the fuel so make your new gasket the same shape. I used cork for my gasket and it worked well. I tried the cork/rubberised stuff first but it doesn't like petrol. So I bought a small sheet of 3mm cork only from a craft supplier on fleabay.
Make sure your mixer needle is nice and clean so that it seats properly into the tapered fit in the mixer body. I have used valve grinding paste to get a good seat or you could even use tooth paste.
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  #56  
Old 01-17-2016, 02:43:31 AM
ozfarm ozfarm is offline
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Default Re: Buzzacot farm pumper rebuild

Quote:
Originally Posted by onetrack View Post
OzFarm - My price of $5 a kg for citric acid at Kakulas', still comes out better than any price per kg at Big Bubble!
wunbluntak
dats wot i said
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  #57  
Old 01-17-2016, 03:58:34 AM
Combustor Combustor is offline
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Default Re: Buzzacot farm pumper rebuild

Left handed grease cups?? My old Rosebery Pumper has a RH cup and I am happy to leave it that way. Watched how close that crank arm comes to the greaser and decided I would not risk losing a hand or at least a shirt sleeve by trying to grab a LH cup while running. Still have an attachment to my various body parts.
Combustor.
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  #58  
Old 01-17-2016, 04:45:24 PM
Scotty 2 Scotty 2 is offline
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Default Re: Buzzacot farm pumper rebuild

Quote:
Originally Posted by onetrack View Post
I've found that electrolysis baths are too dangerous for me. You need to have them well-ventilated because they produce hydrogen gas.

I frightened the living beejeezus out of myself by accidentally arcing a lead over a bubbling electrolysis bath, and it ignited the hydrogen it was producing, exploding it with a huge BANG!!
A real "brown corduroy trousers" moment, I can tell you!

Luckily, I had the bath outdoors (it was a 55 litre plastic storage crate) at the back of my shop - but it was enough to make me realise these style of treatment baths are downright dangerous.
Cheers, Ron.
Hello all.
About as dangerous as charging a lead/acid battery. Same gas is produced and the same precautions should be exercised with both.

Cheers Scott
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  #59  
Old 01-18-2016, 05:18:03 AM
onetrack onetrack is offline
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Default Re: Buzzacot farm pumper rebuild

Yep. And I've seen some battery explosions that would leave you ga-ga. Bits of battery spread over multiple metres, acid in the eyes, clothing buggered, and equipment destroyed. You play with a buildup of highly explosive hydrogen gases at your peril.

As I said, I had a 55 litre container, out in the open behind my shop, more than three-quarters full of washing soda solution - and the buildup of hydrogen on top of the solution was still enough to cause a sizeable BANG, when I arced the charger lead.
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  #60  
Old 01-19-2016, 01:14:44 AM
cobbadog cobbadog is offline
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Default Re: Buzzacot farm pumper rebuild

LH grease cap is not behind the flywheel, it is on the opposite end of the crankshaft to grease the big end.
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