Generators and Motors
[Home] - [HELP] - [Forums] - [Library] - [Photo Gallery] - [Groups] - [Classified Ads] - [Subscribe] - [Links] - [Books] - [Sponsors] -

Go Back   SmokStak > SmokStak® Vintage Electrical Equipment > Generators & Electric Motors General Discussion
Forgot Password? Join Us!

Notices

Generators & Electric Motors General Discussion Antique Generators and Old Electric Motors: Questions and answers about restoring and showing old power generation systems.

Generators & Electric Motors General Discussion

Modern Motor Manufacturing


this thread has 8 replies and has been viewed 1259 times

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 01-12-2018, 05:34:11 PM
Harry's Avatar
Harry Harry is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Sarasota, Florida USA
Posts: 6,297
Thanks: 474
Thanked 11,814 Times in 2,049 Posts
Images: 312
Default Modern Motor Manufacturing

BALDOR - Athens, Georgia Plant



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CBFE-Bt7RjY

Products Manufactured at the Athens Plant: Cast Iron Frame AC Motors, Fixed and Adjustable Speed.
__________________
-- Harry Engines Ignitions Videos Photos
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 01-13-2018, 11:57:47 PM
AngrySailor AngrySailor is offline
Subscriber
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: West Prince, Prince Edward Isand, Canada
Posts: 1,287
Thanks: 541
Thanked 820 Times in 463 Posts
Default Re: Modern Motor Manufacturing

https://youtu.be/_65mXQ-GNVM

Here's a big one.

One older Engineer I worked with sailed an old laker that had steam turbine DC generators which powered a DC motor for main propulsion. It was substantially larger than this from what he described. I wish I still knew him for more details but it was years ago
Reply With Quote
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to AngrySailor For This Post:
  #3  
Old 01-14-2018, 09:18:24 AM
Seafarer12 Seafarer12 is offline
Registered-II
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Dale, TX
Posts: 350
Thanks: 14
Thanked 136 Times in 83 Posts
Default Re: Modern Motor Manufacturing

That motor was a short squatty thing. I wonder what the specs are on it. The highest hp motors we have out here are 2600 hp. They are delta wound and relatively small. We have some monster pump motors but they have less hp but are 8 or 10 pole motors so they are a lot bulkier. They are still over 2000 hp though.

I sailed on a couple diesel electric drive boats but they were puny with twin 800 hp dc motors.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 01-14-2018, 01:34:10 PM
Bob Willman Bob Willman is offline
Registered-II
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Bowling Green, Ohio
Posts: 389
Thanks: 1
Thanked 221 Times in 147 Posts
Default Re: Modern Motor Manufacturing

Before retiring I used to take service calls at a local refinery. One of the compressor decks had 2 six cylinder opposed compressors driven by electric motors. They were 4160V AC - 5000hp each. The rotors were probably 6 feet in diameter but only a couple of feet long. RPM I would guess at around 300. Another ammonia compressor deck had two 3000hp motors slightly smaller.

Bob
WB8NQW
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 01-14-2018, 02:06:38 PM
I like oldstuff I like oldstuff is offline
Subscriber
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 5,262
Thanks: 1,181
Thanked 5,328 Times in 2,146 Posts
Default Re: Modern Motor Manufacturing

I sold a rotor press machine and a shocking machine to Baldor ~15 years ago.

The shrink machine took rotors up to a foot in diameter and I induction heated them to 800F with a 300kW@1 kHz power source. The shaft then was pressed in and held for ~30 seconds then the assembly was taken out.

The shocking machine took rotor and shaft assemblies in the 8-15 inch size range. The laminate area of the rotors was blasted with induction at a much higher frequency. I had 400kW @50 kHz to use. The parts were scan heated, with about 15Kw per square inch current density and heated to about 1500F then quenched. This heating expanded the steel lams temporarily and actually slightly burned the outer diameter of each lam to offset the contact they have with the others.

As the steel lams expanded they slightly stretch the die cast aluminum that holds the rotor together. As the water quench dries out there is now a slight insulating layer of rust formed between the laminations. This reduces eddy currents in the rotor therefore it generates less heat from the hysteresis losses. Once it's dried out it's all sealed up with epoxy varnish.

A pretty simple process that had a lot of material handling in the systems.
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to I like oldstuff For This Post:
  #6  
Old 01-14-2018, 03:06:55 PM
Vanman Vanman is offline
Subscriber
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Mission Viejo, California
Posts: 4,532
Thanks: 5,888
Thanked 1,945 Times in 1,331 Posts
Default Re: Modern Motor Manufacturing

Interesting. I've always pronounced Baldor like ball-door. But you'd like to think that they are pronouncing it correctly in their own film.

But "end plates" are actually called end bells, so who knows lol.

Neat facility and motors, but not much sole left in the motors or their manufacture these days.

Rebuilding that old wound rotor induction motor sure was neat!
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Vanman For This Post:
  #7  
Old 01-14-2018, 11:25:45 PM
AngrySailor AngrySailor is offline
Subscriber
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: West Prince, Prince Edward Isand, Canada
Posts: 1,287
Thanks: 541
Thanked 820 Times in 463 Posts
Default Re: Modern Motor Manufacturing

Quote:
Originally Posted by Seafarer12 View Post
That motor was a short squatty thing. I wonder what the specs are on it. The highest hp motors we have out here are 2600 hp. They are delta wound and relatively small. We have some monster pump motors but they have less hp but are 8 or 10 pole motors so they are a lot bulkier. They are still over 2000 hp though.

I sailed on a couple diesel electric drive boats but they were puny with twin 800 hp dc motors.
The largest motor I've ever come across was the bow thruster on Algoma Integrity. If I recall correctly is was ~1600kw and run on 4160v. The motor itself was maybe 6' diameter and 8' tall. Not really big for its output but also not rated for continuous duty. The transformer was near the size of the motor (440v-4160) and the inrush alone would dim the lights throughout the ship even with 3x1350kw generators paralleled.

Quote:
Originally Posted by I like oldstuff View Post
. I had 400kW @50 kHz to use. .
isn't that getting into RF radiation territory?
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 01-15-2018, 09:54:56 AM
I like oldstuff I like oldstuff is offline
Subscriber
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 5,262
Thanks: 1,181
Thanked 5,328 Times in 2,146 Posts
Default Re: Modern Motor Manufacturing

^ RF technically starts at ~ 400 kHz. I also sold smaller machines around 3-5 kW that ran at around 5 mHz. When your frequencies get over 400 kHz you're restricted to allocated frequency ranges of the radio spectrum. Also did a lot with RF plastic sealers that run at 27.12 mHz. These freqs should have the work area shielded so there is no diathermic heating of people parts! It's fun working with 80 kW @9kV at that freq! The majority of industrial induction hardening and heating units are 50 kW up to 500kW. Freqs from 200hZ to 50 kHz.

The bigger forging and melting systems can go up to ~ 7 megawatts.
Ok, back to the motor thread.

Last edited by I like oldstuff; 01-15-2018 at 10:08:24 AM.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to I like oldstuff For This Post:
  #9  
Old 01-15-2018, 02:38:43 PM
Newoldstock Newoldstock is offline
Registered-II
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Toronto Canada
Posts: 906
Thanks: 358
Thanked 462 Times in 241 Posts
Default Re: Modern Motor Manufacturing

DC motors and wound rotor machines tend to be larger than AC and the spread in frame sizes increase with the increase power rating because they are harder to cool than the induction machines or synchronous.

Lamination Alloy is called Dynamo special.
Its a very low carbon steel with as I recall 2 3/4 silicon.

There are two styles of coil winding here in the video.
The machines are concentric winding the small machines ( with what is called mush coil ).
The larger more expensive motors are being lap wound ( this is the traditional north American way to lay coil and how DC machines are also made )
Rewind shops try and use the concentric winding now because its faster to do.

This all used to be hand made ( quality varied a little too).
I used to spin coil be hand and lay then in slots by hand in a rewind shop.
Process is same for lap and concentric its just slower because its done by hand.
DC and wound rotor work was much harder and required a much higher skill level than induction motors ( I never achieved this level of skill before I left the trade ).

Does not pay to fix them and the wages and for this kind of factory work are low now.
I look on the name plates now and most of these things are made in eastern Europe where the skills are still high but the wages stink or China where the machinery is newer and the wages stink.
You can't compete with that so machines are scrapped unless they are special and can not be found sitting on a shelf as a standard production item
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Newoldstock For This Post:
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

F o r u m Jump

Similar Threads Chosen at Random
Thread Thread Starter F o r u m Replies Last Post
"Modern" motor, possibly old problem someone might recognize Archaeometrist Garden Tractors / Mowers / Scooters 14 10-24-2016 05:18:46 PM
Early Video Ford Motor Co. Manufacturing of Tractors Trucks & Automobiles TractorDom Antique Farm Tractors 2 06-24-2016 12:54:26 AM
Brennan Motor Manufacturing Company TractorDom Multi-Cylinder Stationary Engines and Power Units 2 03-24-2016 10:18:26 AM
Brief History of Wisconsin Motor Manufacturing Co. TractorDom Small Air Cooled Gasoline Engines 2 11-23-2015 12:36:34 AM


Use "Ctrl" mouse wheel to change screen size.
All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:20:13 AM.

Smokstak and Enginads site search!


All use is subject to our TERMS OF SERVICE
SMOKSTAK® is a Registered Trade Mark - A Community of Antique Engine Enthusiasts
Copyright © 2000 - 2016 by Harry Matthews P.O. Box 5612 - Sarasota, FL 34277