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Wisconsin Engines Single cylinder up to V4 engines.

Wisconsin Engines

chrome rings


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  #1  
Old 06-16-2005, 08:57:27 PM
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Mike Schweikert Mike Schweikert is offline
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Default chrome rings

Here's a good question,
I finished restoring a briggs 6hp 143330 engine recently. I installed a set of NOS chrome rings. The briggs book specifically says not to hone which I followed. It worked great and sealed perfectly. Now I have a Wisconsin BKN that I again have a set of NOS chrome rings that I want to use, and in the instructions in the package, it says to specifically hone the cylinder. What gives and why would you have to hone with these?
Thank you
Mike
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Old 06-16-2005, 10:39:27 PM
Andrew Mackey Andrew Mackey is offline
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Exclamation Re: chrome rings

Mike,
I take that the B&S was an aluminum block/cylender engine? The Wisconson is a cast iron/cast iron type? Cast iron is extremely hard. The run in time would be excessive, especially if the cylender was highly polished. When you hone the cast iron, you roughen the hard polished surface. The rings will wear faster, and the cylender will take on a good fit to them. The aluminum cylender, and those engines with a steel cylender insert, on the other hand, are relatively soft materials. The exposed surfaces being polished, are slightly harder than the base material. With the rings being hard chrome, basicly, the rings are honing the cylender as the engine runs! The hardened material is 'scraped off' and as it is doing so, it wears in the chrome rings. If you were to hone these 'soft' cylenders, the rings would rapidly remove the soft material on the cylender walls. Without a harder surface to wear them in, the rings will not seat. This leads to blow by, and oil burning , which creates even more heat. Eventually , you have cylender failure. (BOO-HISS) For best results, follow the instructions in this case!
Andrew
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Old 06-17-2005, 09:01:06 PM
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Mike Schweikert Mike Schweikert is offline
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Default Re: chrome rings

Thank you for the concise response. Now the mystery is solved, at least for me
Mike
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