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Alternative Fuels An energy source alternative to using fossil fuels. Materials or substances that can be used as a fuel, other than conventional fuels. Waste oils, vegetable oils or animal fats, which can be used alone, or blended with fossil fuels.

Alternative Fuels

Can you really live off grid?


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  #61  
Old 05-06-2014, 12:02:06 PM
dkamp dkamp is offline
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Default Re: Can you really live off grid?

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Originally Posted by froelich View Post
dkamp, I 'm pretty sure the Mississippi River is longer that your porch. If you would get out more you would realize there's more to it than what you see from your rocking chair. The Missouri is also a large factor in the levels of the Mississippi, but you already knew that.
I'm pretty sure that, having held a 100-ton liscense, and having navigated from Coon Rapids Dam and Arcola Sandbar to LaPlace, Louisiana, that I know exactly how long it is, as well as the Ohio to Cinci, and the Tenn-Tom to Mobile, and yes, the Missouri's watershed carries a high percentage of the Miss's flow, I spent a whole lotta time running up and down the west side of Iowa dealing with flooding when Lewis and Clark hit it's upper limits several years ago.

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Originally Posted by froelich View Post
Me's thinking your river gauge needs a little calibration.
Then send a message to the USACE- it's THEIR gauge, and it's been there since their survey in 1902. It was originally measured by a human, on a day-to-day basis with a clipboard. During the '70's it was fitted with an OMNIData level reader, and transmitted it's measurement via twisted-pair to the LD14 control room, then repeated to MVD Vicksburg. In the '80's it was fitted with a satellite uplink which Vicksburg shared with NOAA/NWS, and the reading you see there, and at all the other URM sites, are reflected the same way.

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Originally Posted by froelich View Post
Your gravely mistaken about my opinions of the OFF GRID" fad. With out electricity or with it. Not using it is not an honest attempt to live self-sufficient.

I think you're opinions have lead you to gravely mistaken about the OP's original question, and have taken it from a simple, practical question, to that of philosophical rant of presidential proportion.

You've somehow associated the very essence of every facet of human existance to the presence of a network of electrical power generation, transmission, and distribution lines, which if lost, would cause humanity to cease to exist... even though said network is barely two generations old.

The man didn't ask wether he could survive without society or humanity, and he didn't ask if humanity were somehow restricted to living amidst a technological world.

What the man asked, is wether it's possible to have a comfortable home somewhere where such power wasn't available.

The answer is yes. People do, and the key is to establishing priorities, and making compromises.


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Originally Posted by froelich View Post
You are just electing to not use clean stable power.
Clean and stable are relative terms. I wouldn't consider my utility power to be clean or stable, but I'm in the metrologic profession, so when one person would consider my power here to be 'clean', I'd point out that there's a very high component of RF hash appearing on L2 as a result of a dusty insulator on the pole a quarter mile north of me, and it breaks over frequently on rainy days... and under high wind and rain, it usually blows the pole fuse at the south end. Is that clean? Frankly, it's irrelevant unless I'm trying to hear someone transmitting on AM at 3.875mhz on a cold winter's night.

Now, when that fuse blows, our feed (single phase) goes out 'till the lineman arrives with his truck and replaces it. He won't clean or replace the insulator, but he should- it's all covered with the remains of an owl that got zortched there (hence, the breakover). It's quicker just to replace the fuse...

But in the meantime, it's no big deal, because everyone on my line has become accustomed to it going out... we all have generators, and some of us have batteries and inverters too, so it's no big deal. I suppose if he'd replace the damned insulator, we wouldn't run our generators as often, but they get regular exercise, and he gets paid double-overtime for Sunday.

It's just a bit annoying when power goes out, and they don't send a lineman to replace the fuse because there's been an ice-storm, there's 50,000 in town without power, and our road is impassible from drifting and blowing. Under those circumstances, anyone with even half-sense, understands the reason to maintain a large modicum of self-sufficience, as we don't consider freezing to death in our own homes to be a reasonable comfort.

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Originally Posted by froelich View Post
If you were to walk out on the ice in the great white north and walk back 10 yrs later, wearing seal and bear skins. I would be the first to commend you for living with out all the crutches and support and welfare you could have got by staying in town.
So you're saying what- that being willing to be self-sufficient and live within one's own means is somehow lesser than suckling off the teat of others? Is the next argument something to the effect of "You Didn't Build That"?

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Originally Posted by froelich View Post
Using electricity other than what is from a power company is not in the same league.
You're certainly right with that point- I can tell you this much... that the power provided to me by the utility company COULD be a whole lot better than it IS, but it isn't... and if I don't maintain a proactive attitude towards such things, I certainly won't have power when I need it the most.

But if your point is that a power company is the first and foremost source of electrical power, please don't insult your great-grandfather with that... there was electricity well before there were power companies. Take a walk through an abandoned steel mill, and you'll find that there's power lines... they weren't coming IN... they were going OUT. The first 'official' electric utilities may have been Edison, but the first major power producers were steel mills and coke plants... they used waste heat to make steam, to run generators for their own electric motors and lighting, and they sold off the excess. The houses between Clinton and Muscatine, Iowa were electrified in 1903...long before electric utilities existed, and it was by the Clinton, Davenport, and Muscatine Interurban Electric Railway, through virtue of the railway easement along affected properties: They offered electricity to each home on the easement, for easement right, and my abstract still shows it.

http://www.r2parks.net/CD&M.html

This electricity was not generated by a utility company, it was by an electric railway that had steam plants with generators at regular intervals, and at regular intervals along the way were motor-generators to convert the 600v (very 'nominal') catenary feeder down to 90vdc, which was connected to each house with a 40A fusebox.

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Originally Posted by froelich View Post
I'm going to turn all of my lights off and proclaim I'm off grid. I'm sure the folks in the neighborhood will get a laugh out it. Question? Are we living off grid after a tornado takes the power out for a week and we use a generator to chat on the net??????????? I didn't think so. When a fugitive drops off grid and vanishes, it has nothing about power lines hooked to his a~~.
How is that concept relevant to the original poster's question? Are you suggesting he's doing it to prove some point to his neighbors, or been struck by a tornado, or a fugitive?

From what I read (and I do read first...) that his question was more down the lines of "I want to live in a particular spot, and there's no way I can get utility electric power..."


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Originally Posted by froelich View Post
OFF GRID is no more than a subsidized group of companies and writers getting folks to spend more money on this fad than they can recoup. 50 yrs down the road when the systems may become a necessity they will be so antiquated and no longer functional to do much good.
Okay, so what you're doing here, is associating one guy who's trying to find a way to live a comfortable life, in a place he loves, with a bunch of idiots in political positions playing pawns and paper with something that's obviously effective and proven.

Let me clarify this again- he wasn't asking to change the world- he doesn't expect to. He has a place where power isn't available, and he wants to live there.

If it is your point that the socio-political 'movement' towards 'green energy' is a concept which assails a system which is sensible and proven, and does so substantially for political and economic gain of those who promote it, rather than for the cause by which people interpret it, I agree with you 100%.

This was not the original poster's question.

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Originally Posted by froelich View Post
I don't care if you pay an electrical bill or not...........I DON"T CARE.
Neither does he, that's not why he asked the question.
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  #62  
Old 05-06-2014, 08:33:15 PM
Glenn Ayers Glenn Ayers is offline
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Default Re: Can you really live off grid?

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Originally Posted by dkamp View Post
I'm pretty sure that, having held a 100-ton liscense, and having navigated from Coon Rapids Dam and Arcola Sandbar to LaPlace, Louisiana, that I know exactly how long it is, as well as the Ohio to Cinci, and the Tenn-Tom to Mobile, and yes, the Missouri's watershed carries a high percentage of the Miss's flow, I spent a whole lotta time running up and down the west side of Iowa dealing with flooding when Lewis and Clark hit it's upper limits several years ago............................................
Hahahahaha
Pipe thoroughly stuffed .. lit .. smoked .. tamped out & handed back.

BTW dkamp ... my keyboard is now soaked with sprayed Mountain Dew ... you owe me a new one.
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  #63  
Old 05-07-2014, 01:32:22 AM
dkamp dkamp is offline
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Default Re: Can you really live off grid?

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Originally Posted by froelich View Post
Wow , now there's someone with an attitude. You sound like the solar panel salesman's dream.
Well, I wasn't going to mention it, but my impression is that you're a soon-to-retire employee of FirstEnergy. Back in November of 2003, my company provided all the synchronized fault-data recording that pinpointed the source of the Northeast Intertie Blackout of August 14th. Perhaps you'd recognize the event, as it started in Ohio, and constituted the most widespread grid failure in North American history to date... it even tore heck out of Ontario Hydro's HVDC links. Those were MY data recorders, installed at substations all across NY and PA. We saw it from the moment it started, 'till the last lights went out in New Jersey. See, I'm no stranger to generating plants, substations, and grid distribution. You hail it as if it is an infalliable gift from God. The synchronous AC polyphase grid is an amazing thing... I tip my hat to Nikola Tesla for that, and many other things he's rarely given credit for, but just because it's amazing, doesn't make it perfect.


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Originally Posted by froelich View Post
Can you live without wires connected to your house. Yes.... But you will never survive today without the benefit the GRID provides you. I'm sorry that concept blew so far over your head, that you think we need to resort to a cat fight in order for you to get your opinions across.
Cat fight? of course not. I'm amazed that you've repeated your rant, and still not grasped the original question:

"The location I am building my house is a mile from the powerline, its going to cost me about $20,000 to get a line put in plus its going to ruin the looks of the turn of the century farm, I am building on part of my family's original homestead and there was never any roads put in so now power yet. "

You're attacking like a troubled child, without considering the content of the question.

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Originally Posted by froelich View Post
People like to boast about how they are beating the blood thirsty power companies at their own game, when in fact those that claim they are living without the grid are actually more dependent on it than those that just use it and get on with their life. We live in today, not a century ago.
Or perhaps you're taking it personally. An individual who takes initiative to reduce their personal energy use, can only do so using their utility bill as a measuring-stick. When they invest in say... LED light bulbs, and find that their cooling costs go down as well, they have all the reason in the world to be proud of the accomplishment. If you figured out the relationship between keeping a stepladder in the back of your pickup, or on the roof, and realized the ladder rack was costing you 6mpg, wouldn't you feel that satsifactory?


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Originally Posted by froelich View Post
I can point you to many so called Green energy systems that only exist because of the massive subsidies that paid for them. There are also a lot of them that were built that are not in use because the maintenance required to keep them functional was so exorbitant that they are sitting dormant. The Chinese have taken us to the cleaners with this Green Fad that we are engaging in.
Hey- and it's not just systems... it's COMPANIES... some that exist in reality, and some only on paper. Solyndra lined the he## out'a someone's pockets, and we can all be certain that it was 'planned to fail' from the git-go.

IF there's someone taken 'to the cleaners', it's the US manufacturing sector, for not being THE leader in such manufacturing, but also, for being shackled with environmental, tax, and employment regulations that make it unprofitable to manufacture things like LED light bulbs here. It's happening overseas, because we SEND it there.


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Originally Posted by froelich View Post
I'm all for alternative energy, and happen to believe electricity of some form will be it. We build systems that could not be possible if it was not for electrical powered motion. Could you imagine the disk drive, pharmaceutical, food industries, to name a few, operating in those environments of a 100 yrs ago. These are just a fraction of the examples of why I say you will not live off grid.
Of course not... simple economy of scale relegates that industry requires infrastructure and specialized power production. With the exception of SOME industries where direct-fuel is actually beneficial to process (like using coke in a blast furnace to inject carbon into steels), having grid-power infrastructure is necessary to make for ANY modicum of efficiency.

But when someone is faced with a home situation that doesn't live within practical reach of utility, and they wonder if it's POSSIBLE to live with benefit of modern comfort without that utility feed, there's no reason why they cannot.

Quote:
Originally Posted by froelich View Post
Maybe we need to go back and first define life, or our ability to live it.
This is EXACTLY the case. When someone is faced with lack of grid power for their HOME, they have to seek other options. It's not easy to 'beat' the cost of utility-based electrical power... and it certainly cannot be done without active involvement of the individual... you can't have battery storage, solar, wind, or engine-generation without being committed to the monitoring and maintenance. You can't even have a wood-burning stove without managing wood, cleaning the stove, stoking the fire, and cleaning the chimney. It also means that one accepts the cost of energy in that circumstance... meaning... I can't generate my backup electrical power for less than 2x of utility grid... but when I have no choice, I do so in such a way that I get the most out of each drop of fuel burned, and I make it last by not throwing it away.

The answer to the question is a simple two-part answer:

Yes... but one must be willing to commit themselves to the effort.

Most people don't have the intestinal fortitude to do so, and for those that would, don't have the technical and intellectual capacity to do it, at least, without assistance from people who have knowledge and experience in it. Those that do, have demonstrated very clever ways of doing so, and the end result is amazingly low-impact. None of them that I know, express some massive detachment from society, or shun the infrastructure as evil. They pay taxes just like the rest of us... they just live in the boonies where they can't get it any other way, so they do what they have to do. I think that's just fine, as that's what freedom and liberty are about.
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Old 05-07-2014, 08:39:04 AM
Ed Sparks Ed Sparks is offline
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Default Re: Can you really live off grid?

and then there are folks who can't live without a whalemart on every street corner or a mickey D's on the block.
There are folks that can get along just fine without cell phones or texting. We don't have them.

Just hard working folks with no mortgages enjoying life without all the crap that many Can't get through the day without

We are on the grid and 25 minutes to any of the " so called "conveniences. The grid has been known to go down for a week or more on regular occasions. We get by just fine as we are all prepared.
I've actually been up to a month without the need to go to the mainland from here.

Why is it so hard to live in rural america without being tied to the grid?? [ thats sarcasm]
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  #65  
Old 05-07-2014, 09:22:10 AM
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Onan Dan Onan Dan is offline
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Default Re: Can you really live off grid?

Ed I am with you good buddy there is a lot of stuff we can live with out and all those gadgets I call them I have this computer that is my tie to the out side world I would miss the Stak here but I could live with out it. we all need to take a time out and open the Holy bible and just look at nature and thank God for this beautiful time of year and I have forgot what the two fellows are in cohoots about any how the last time the grid was down it was for 8 days and you know I kind of liked the peace and tranquiity the tele phone was still we were snowed it had a little 2300 watt screamer and it did all we needed we have nature gas and do not need power for heat and hot water food in the pantry we have a drilled water well and it is 110volt and if need to be I can bail the water up by rope and pulley. we get to dependant on all these luxuries one day we may be back to horse and buggy and raising food and meat our fore fathers did and I know we can also any way peace fellows

Last edited by Onan Dan; 05-07-2014 at 11:25:13 AM.
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Old 05-07-2014, 12:29:32 PM
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Talking Re: Can you really live off grid?

Just a NOTE here: The nearest Grid to me is 250 Miles away.... Thru Alaska Wilderness... No roads that connect to anywhere, within those 250 Miles.... I generate ALL my own power.... and have for the last 20+ years.... Would you consider "Me" as living Off-Grid??? Just wondering.... Inquiring Minds want to Know....
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Old 05-07-2014, 02:04:34 PM
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Craig A Craig A is offline
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Talking Re: Can you really live off grid?

Brucie........you aren't only off the grid.......you're halfway off the planet....... .......

(For those who don't know........where Bruce lives he IS the grid....... )
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Old 05-07-2014, 06:41:22 PM
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Default Re: Can you really live off grid?

Craig all I got to say is Bruce is one tough fellow part polar bear and grizzely bear and got to have some Eskimo in him
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Old 05-07-2014, 08:17:54 PM
Ed Sparks Ed Sparks is offline
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Default Re: Can you really live off grid?

BT: I'm sure someone from ohio will claim you are totally dependent on the grid for all your necessities.
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Old 05-07-2014, 10:14:31 PM
Ed Sparks Ed Sparks is offline
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Default Re: Can you really live off grid?

Nah : We usually have to go out and save the coasties when they put their 42's in the mud or on the ledges.

Amazing thing about most coasties::: they are from farm country where the deepest water is the duck pond in the back 40.

Put them out here in the real ocean with lots of shallow ledges and they get in trouble.

They were up in the bay one day and got caught on the outbound tide.
Sat there high & dry for 10 hours with the wheels showing. We sent out some sandwiches & chowda by a clamdiggers airboat.
Now they only come out so far and launch their zodiacs to come inshore.

Before anyone gets their panties in a twist:
As a retired Seabee,
I have the utmost respect for my brothers in the CG. We worked together a lot when needed, and always pick on each other with no mercy .
We even offered to build training wheels for their boats to help keep them out of trouble.
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Old 05-08-2014, 01:23:07 AM
dkamp dkamp is offline
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Default Re: Can you really live off grid?

I'd like to visit a bunch of guys who're up along the Alaska coastline, and see all that they do. There's a guy up in Palmer, Alaska (about 50 miles up the river from Anchorage) that's in a situation similar to Bruce, and he IS the utility... and he knows VERY WELL where his energy comes from, and where it goes.

We had an extended outage due to a mid-January ice storm about seven years ago. Took down half the spans over our 4-mile line, we had toppled poles buried under 7' ice-drifts. That wasn't an extremely cold winter by any measure, but we had extreme winds, and the house leaked like a seive. We burned 4500 gallons of propane that winter... and lucky for us, our contract price was under a dollar a gallon.

I ran a gasoline-fueld air-cooled Onan 5CCK to keep the furnace and well operational, and towards the end of that timeframe, I was gettin' really danged worried, on account that I STARTED with plenty of gasoline reserves, and when we got towards the end of that week, many of the local stations were still out of power, and our road was still impassable, so I took advantage of a source I hadn't previously anticipated... I had the 17' and 23' Sea Rays, as well as my dad's '53 Century Resorter in storage in the pole barn, and we always store boats with full tanks of winter formulation to keep condensation at bay... well, I wound up using all the 23'er's 75 gallons, and was getting ready to pull from the 17' (high-octane!) and the Resorter when the crews finally managed to get the roads clear enough to get through to a station.

We did a major rehab/addition that 'wrapped' around this old four-square, and in the process, took advantage of access up through the second story exterior walls, blew insulation all throughout, wrapped it in 2" EPS and Tyvek, and poured PEX tubing into the basement and south porch floors. That south porch's windows were calculated for solar gain during the winter solar elevation, and I had the concrete in that floor dyed black throughout, so that it'd absorb more winter sunshine. I ran extensions to my PEX out to the generator shed, and since then replaced the CCK with three dual-fuel liquid cooled generators, with heat exchangers, so that when I'm burning propane to generate electricity, I'm capturing all the waste heat and sending it to the house. Co-Generation really boosts the cost effectiveness of a gallon burned..

The other thing I've done, is systematically replaced all the incandescent, Long-tube and CFLs with LEDs. This knocked a major chunk out of the resistive loads, and has allowed me to run the one-size smaller generating plant that I would've run before, and when I'm not in need of a major load, I can shut the engine down and run off battery-inverter to save fuel. It's really no different from the setup in a houseboat or cabin-cruiser, except for we don't need an anchor.

The cost of LED'ing the house was pretty high, but I did it a few lamps at-a-time, started with the ones that got the most burn-time in a day... and just worked my way along. The boon of it, is that there's so much less waste heat in the house, that on a really hot day, my air-conditioning isn't working HALF as hard as it was before.

If there's nothing else to be said for it, having outages, and having my own backup systems on-the-ready, it HAS given me very good incentive to eliminate waste and increase the efficiency of our lives. I think everyone would be better off in many ways once blessed with such an experience, but alas, many never will.
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Old 09-27-2015, 09:51:54 PM
t6299fm t6299fm is offline
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Default Re: Can you really live off grid?

Yes you can !! BUT>>>>You have to choose your location. You need a natural energy source. Gas well, Oil well, coal, wood, River, wind, sun. But, "you gotta love it" if you know what I mean. It takes machines to convert these natural gifts into modern electricity and they must be understood, installed and MAINTAINED (that means talent and sweat). I chose water and bought an old mill sight. I have more power than I will ever use, I Leave the doors open in winter, use resistance heat and melt iron with an induction furnace. Normal things like: Welding, shop tools, Water pumps and Hot water heaters don't even get noticed by this generator. My normal source is a 125 KW turbine generator (state of the art 1929) that runs 24/7 at 164 RPM making 3 phase at 2400 Volts. After an initial rebuild with stainless in 1994, I have been running this thing 21 years and after the annual inspection today, very little adjustment was needed. Yea, I could sell the excess..... but They discourage it with BS; so I run a governor and am happy with 58 to 62 cycles all year......No grid for me.
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Old 09-27-2015, 11:01:04 PM
Ramey Ramey is offline
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Default Re: Can you really live off grid?

iT'S good to see things from the past can be still used today. some of the old technology worked well. I myself would like to get of the gird and have put a lot of thought into it. I grew up with a wood stove and a propane fridge with a deisel power plant for the winter and when we needed power. It cost about 20000 to put the hydro in because we had to pay for the polls, to have telephone come in would have bein 17000 because hydro charges to hang the line on our polls. go figure! My family farm is in northern british Columbia. Canada
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Old 10-07-2015, 07:39:46 AM
George Andreasen George Andreasen is offline
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Default Re: Can you really live off grid?

I'm going to answer based on my 5 year experience of living without commercial power or water in northern California.

In the early eighties, my wife (at that time) and I built a small barn on our 80 acre parcel near MacArthur, California. The first thing we did was to have a well drilled and set up a windmill. A pump jack, powered by a an Ottawa flywheel engine, pushed water to an elevated 1100 gallon poly tank on a nearby hill.

The house we built was a two story replica of a Victorian farm house, designed by me, and ended up at 1800 square feet. The roof peak was 32 feet above ground level and was equipped with eight Arco photovoltaic panels capable of 35 amps each at 12 volts (bear in mind this was early eighties technology...new panels are much better). The house was wired with ordinary 12 gauge Romex and all light fixtures were 12 volt. The only 110 volt appliance we used was a color t.v. set and that had a 200 watt inverter. Worked fine.....my kids watched cartoons without problems.

Our routine was to pump water about every three days or so. I checked the storage batteries......big stationary lighting cells.......each morning, verifying their state of charge, adding water if needed, etc.

The only real mistake I made was to have the poly water tank exposed. It never froze, but the sunlight promoted algae growth. Nothing like a big glob of green snot coming out of the faucet when you're brushing your teeth! Next time I would have used a black tank enclosed in a tank house.

We were quite comfortable for the five years and only got commercial power when my son's medical condition required a humidifier that had to run all night. The commercial power made life a little easier, but I can understand how farmers in the thirties weren't all that thrilled with giving up their private Delco lightplants. Everything worked well and I didn't have a monthly bill!

It was a very interesting and instructive period in my life. Then came the divorce...........................

---------- Post added at 04:39 AM ---------- Previous post was at 04:09 AM ----------

I have to add a new post, since my computer is giving me fits and I can't edit for some reason....

I gained a wealth of experience on my self sufficient homestead. I made mistakes, but many things were thought out well in advance so those mistakes were minor. If I can help with any questions regarding off grid living, just PM me and I'd be happy to share.

Regarding your home generated power with photovoltaic panels: Don't mount them on the roof. Looks cool but are a nightmare to service. Put them in a rack at ground level for easy repair/modification. Arrange your battery bank to be close. Ours was under the stairway in the house with a vent to exhaust any gasses.

A massive battery storage bank is NOT the answer to everything. Charging capability is....buy more panels for a quick recharge instead. Buy good quality lead acid batteries. Golf cart batteries offer good storage and performance in a small package. Fork lift batteries? Come on......the things weigh a ton and are overkill for your needs.

Use D.C. for everything you can think of. Inverters are great but they use a tremendous amount of amperage (current) in order to produce 110 volts and will drain your batteries quickly. Rather than spend money on an inverter, just use the 12 volt D.C. There are many appliances available from the RV industry.

The new 12 volt LED light bulbs are FAR better than the ordinary bulbs and florescent fixtures I used. They use virtually no power and produce good light. Stay away from kerosene lamps....very bucolic and nostalgic, but they stink and are a fire hazard.

A gasoline engine will pump your water nicely, but as an experiment I rigged up a Ford truck generator as a motor on my pump jack and wired it directly to the panels on my roof. It pumped water beautifully all day long until the sun went down and as a result, the Ottawa engine ended up being used on a standby basis. There are 12 volt permanent magnet motors available now that are very efficient.

Plan your entire homestead to take advantage of natural features well in advance of building. Once you realize that you should have built that shed over there, it's too late!
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Old 10-07-2015, 01:40:03 PM
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Forrest A Forrest A is offline
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Default Re: Can you really live off grid?

Most of the commercial-scale turbines installed today are 2 MW in size and cost roughly $3-$4 million installed.

So to answer the question "Can you really live off grid?" is YES! All you need up front is $3-4 million. After installation you can sell your unused power back to the local utility and use the new found money to buy food and anything else needed to survive. Maybe have enough to buy some rusty iron to restore with your new found free time as you wont have to work any more. I am surprised that more people whom have that money to invest have not done just that.
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Old 04-03-2017, 10:20:52 AM
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Default Re: Can you really live off grid?

Yes you can live off grid. Quite comfortably with as little as 5000 w though If you don't have a gas Maytag washer and l.p. dryer then you really need around 7.5-10 kw continuous rating. Either old iron or a good low rpm diesel is the way to go cause the New gas screamers just won't last in this type of setup not to mention being inaccurately rated.

Had a guy give me a New EPA generator that was supposedly 8500--6500 w but woyldnt even start my window a.c. so sold it. That same a.c. unit runs like a champ off my 5kw homelite climatic with briggs 23d. My little 3 kw onan will start it too if all other loads are off.
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