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Carburetors, Mixers, Fuel Pumps and fuel delivery Discussion about misc. carbs, mixers, fuel pumps, injectors.

Carburetors, Mixers, Fuel Pumps and fuel delivery

Float Repair


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  #1  
Old 06-28-2016, 08:03:20 PM
J Ware J Ware is offline
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Default Float Repair

Took my Twin City 21 32 to Natl. Thrashers last weekend, it ran great. Got home and went to unload it and couldn't get it started, and gas was running out of air cleaner. Took carb apart and found float logged with gas. Was able to get the halves of the float apart.
Has anyone had any experience with soldering a float. I have to fix this as these carbs or parts are like hens teeth.
Or maybe you know of someone that custom makes new brass floats. Jim
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Old 06-28-2016, 08:17:33 PM
JoeCB JoeCB is offline
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Default Re: Float repair

what does the float look like? dimensions ? repop brass floats are available for things like Model A Fords and likely other applications as well

Joe B
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Old 06-28-2016, 09:30:47 PM
J Ware J Ware is offline
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Default Re: Float repair

Its round with a 2 inch o.d. and is 1inch thick. I could solder the float arm on a new float , just need to find a replacement. Jim
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Old 06-28-2016, 11:01:30 PM
Gene Williams Gene Williams is offline
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Default Re: Float repair

Dave Reed- ringspacers.com has some floats made from some new composite material and it works well and is easy to shape to your needs.
I am sure some of the other sponsors have these as well
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Old 06-28-2016, 11:11:28 PM
clnr94 clnr94 is offline
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Default Re: Float repair

I have took floats to the TV repair shop over the years an had them re soldered because they can do it without putting so much solder on it an making it too heavy
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Old 06-29-2016, 12:43:03 AM
Amax Amax is offline
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Default Re: Float Repair

I agree that you should be able to solder it yourself. Use good technique to clean, remove the old solder, reclean, and gentle heat to sweat in new solder.
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Old 06-29-2016, 05:46:36 AM
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Elden DuRand Elden DuRand is offline
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Default Re: Float Repair

The way I've always fixed brass floats that leaked was to first, find and mark the leak.

Then, before re-soldering the leak, I punch a small hole in the float with an awl and drain the gasoline out of it. This might take some time or you could use the soldering iron to heat the float and force the gas out.

After the float is empty, fix the leak then use a little solder to cover the pinhole you made to drain it.

No real reason to take the float apart but that works, too.
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Old 06-29-2016, 10:10:55 AM
Andrew Mackey Andrew Mackey is offline
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Default Re: Float Repair

I use either a Weller soldering gun at low heat or a hobbiest soldering pen used to solder lead glass window solder joints. 50-50 solder or 60-40, lead-tin alloys only. You need to clean off ALL gas residue and make sure both metal surfaces are clean. Rosin core electrical grade solder will work if not overheated, but I like acid core better. I have also used NO Krode plumbers solder paste too, with good results. As others have said, the trick is not to overheat! Only solder about 1/4" of the seam at a time, and let col 5 minutes between sessions. if you have already taken the float apart, the pin hole trick will be needed to prevent float collapse during cool down. You want the MINIMUM amount of heat to melt the solder!. Wipe off excess solder while the joint is still hot, then let cool thoroughly before continuing. A good carb repair shop should be able to hok you up with a new float. The new phenolic floats work well too, and you don't have to worry about the crap E-10 eating up the metal either.
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Old 06-29-2016, 01:19:47 PM
Bud Tierney Bud Tierney is offline
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Default Re: Float Repair

On getting the gas out of a leaking float---don't think that if the hole was big enough to let liquid gas in, heating the float will evaporate the gas and the vapor will easily escape thru the leak...
Don't ask how I learned this...
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Old 06-29-2016, 02:11:21 PM
carbking carbking is offline
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Default Re: Float Repair

One of the articles from my website:

BRASS FLOATS

Many mechanics have been conditioned to ask for a float each time they rebuild a carburetor, due to the reasonable price of modern, mass-produced floats, and the propensity of nitrophyl (foam) floats to absorb gasoline after time. In dealing with older, NON-CURRENT-PRODUCTION brass floats, neither of the above are true, and a mechanic should attempt to 'save' the float if at all possible.

The first step is to clean the float and inspect it for obvious damage. Small dings and dents are quite common, even in unused floats, and occurred when the manufacturer shipped the floats in bulk. Major dents (generally caused by water freezing in the carburetor) are not generally repairable. If one can hear liquid sloshing around inside the float, skip to the next paragraph. If the float looks to be reasonably damage-free, it should be tested. Testing is accomplished by grasping the float arm with a pair of needle-nose pliers, and submerging the float in very hot water. The hot water will pressurize the air inside the float, and a leaky float will blow a stream of bubbles.

If the float should need repair, it is important to understand how the float was originally produced. Virtually all brass float pontoons (the floating part) are composed of two pieces (a few are more) of brass soldered together. The pieces differ in the seam area, as one piece has a male seam and the other a female seam. One float piece will also have a small hole for temperature equilization. This hole will be covered by a small drop of solder, and will be as far from the seam as possible. The manufacturer would solder the two pieces together, allow the float to cool completely, AND THEN close the equilization hole. Soldering MUST be done using a soldering 'iron'. Repair should not be attempted using either a torch, or a soldering gun. If you plan on disregarding this advice, also plan on trying to find another float! The following procedure works for us (no, we will not repair your float unless we restore the entire carburetor): First, if liquid is present inside the float, find the hole, and remove the liquid by placing the hole down inside the hot water. The pressure will force the liquid from the float. If the float has much liquid, it may be necessary to remove the float from the hot water, allow the float to cool, and repeat the hot water dip. Once the liquid has been removed, and the leak has been marked, open the equilization hole by removing the solder. Solder the leak closed using as little solder as possible. A small piece of tape over the equilization hole will allow the hot water test to be preformed. If there are no leaks, remove the tape, and ALLOW THE FLOAT TO COOL COMPLETELY before closing the equilization hole. A final test, and you have 'saved' a valuable float.

Jon.
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