Antique Engines and Old Iron
[Home] - [HELP] - [Forums] - [Groups] - [Classified Ads] - [Subscribe] - [Books] - [Sponsors] -

Go Back   SmokStak > SmokStak® General Discussion > Trucks, Trailers and Hauling for Shows
Forgot Password? Join Us!

Notices

Trucks, Trailers and Hauling for Shows The ins and outs of setting up a show trailer and getting it to and from the engine show. Please be fully aware of our web site Terms of Use Disclaimer as you read. Safety first!

Trucks, Trailers and Hauling for Shows

Chaining Tractors Down


this thread has 25 replies and has been viewed 21181 times

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 02-27-2012, 10:46:35 PM
Ben Zimmerer Ben Zimmerer is offline
Registered-II
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Lindsay, Texas
Posts: 180
Thanks: 748
Thanked 679 Times in 89 Posts
Default Chaining Tractors Down

This last weekend at a tractor show I had someone tell me that I was not under DOT regulations because I did not use 4 chains to hold my tractor down. I have always used 2 chains one on the front and one on the back. The guy told me that it is required that you have 4 chains and 4 binders. Two on front and two on back. That is not including any attachments. The guy told me the purpose of 4 chains and binders was so if one of the chains broke then it had another chain holding the tractor. So is this truly a new regulation or is it just gossip? Thanks
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 02-27-2012, 11:06:34 PM
DCamp DCamp is offline
Subscriber
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Cookshire, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 390
Thanks: 27
Thanked 150 Times in 116 Posts
Default Re: Chaining Tractors Down

This reg. came in about 15 years ago around here. They also have to be certified chains and binders. So we had to change some of our tie downs and anchor points on our trucks to comply.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to DCamp For This Post:
  #3  
Old 02-28-2012, 12:05:17 AM
theamishland theamishland is offline
Registered-I
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Arthur, Illinois, USA
Posts: 26
Thanks: 28
Thanked 5 Times in 4 Posts
Default Re: Chaining Tractors Down

Uhh... I bought a tractor up here in Illinois and my brother had JUST taken his CDL test... we put 2 binders on it and he said it was DOT.

But then again... believe none of what you hear and only half of what you see.

---------- Post added at 10:03 PM ---------- Previous post was at 09:56 PM ----------

Check this one out... bit lengthy... but it is the gov't.

http://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/rules-regul.../cs-policy.htm

It's in there... scroll 80% of the way down and look for, "sect;393.128 " That's a pretty good, thorough, overdone explanation.

---------- Post added at 10:05 PM ---------- Previous post was at 10:03 PM ----------

Or just read this....


In addition to the requirements of paragraph (b) of this section, heavy equipment or machinery with crawler tracks or wheels must be restrained against movement in the lateral, forward, rearward, and vertical direction using a minimum of four tiedowns.
2. Each of the tiedowns must be affixed as close as practicable to the front and rear of the vehicle, or mounting points on the vehicle that have been specifically designed for that purpose. & sect;393.132
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to theamishland For This Post:
  #4  
Old 02-28-2012, 03:25:39 AM
Andrew Mackey Andrew Mackey is offline
Sponsor
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Rockaway, New Jersey USA
Posts: 14,102
Thanks: 1,993
Thanked 6,734 Times in 4,279 Posts
Exclamation Re: Chaining Tractors Down

Recent regulation changes here in NJ state that you must use 4 chains to anchor tractors. No more nylon ratchet straps. BOO HISS.
Andrew
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Andrew Mackey For This Post:
  #5  
Old 02-28-2012, 07:24:14 AM
Toesmack's Avatar
Toesmack Toesmack is offline
Subscriber
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Sparks, Nevada
Posts: 524
Thanks: 295
Thanked 364 Times in 208 Posts
Default Re: Chaining Tractors Down

Most states require 4 chains or straps, but they do have to be a load certified strap or chain sufficent to restrain the load. No Harbor frt or Cheapo Depot wimpy tie-downs. The chains will usually be color coded, class 70 or better. Straps need to have the load tag SEWN IN. 4 corner tie down in opposing directions. I've seen plenty of cars and tractors shift or come loose on the trailer with only 2 chains. And yes, most highway patrols are enforcing this.

It only takes another minute. Faster than being sorry forever.
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Toesmack For This Post:
  #6  
Old 02-28-2012, 03:01:43 PM
Grape Grape is offline
Subscriber
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Menomonie, Wisconsin
Posts: 748
Thanks: 227
Thanked 812 Times in 274 Posts
Default Re: Chaining Tractors Down

That is a good rule, when in the Army we transported our equipment by rail a lot. Some of our armored personnel carriers were involved in a train derailment. They were secured at 4 points with approved chains and binders and I don't think they moved an inch on the car deck. Even if hauling something not worth much, think of how much dammage it could do to others if it got loose on a busy highway.
( I have cheated on tiedowns in the past but I don't any more)
__________________
Phil Grape
Remember, to Belittle others is to Be Little yourself
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Grape For This Post:
  #7  
Old 02-28-2012, 03:49:31 PM
KevinJ KevinJ is offline
Subscriber
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Ravenna, Michigan, USA
Posts: 184
Thanks: 13
Thanked 67 Times in 45 Posts
Default Re: Chaining Tractors Down

Quote:
Originally Posted by bjz View Post
This last weekend at a tractor show I had someone tell me that I was not under DOT regulations because I did not use 4 chains to hold my tractor down. I have always used 2 chains one on the front and one on the back. The guy told me that it is required that you have 4 chains and 4 binders. Two on front and two on back. That is not including any attachments. The guy told me the purpose of 4 chains and binders was so if one of the chains broke then it had another chain holding the tractor. So is this truly a new regulation or is it just gossip? Thanks
There is a 10,000# cutoff on that regulation.

Over 10k requires all 4 corners.

Chain only needs to rated to the load. Grade 43 is OK if it is big enough.

Back in the 70's we were issued grade 43 and lever binders to haul steel, never lost a load.

Again the regs have a chart for all this stuff.

You need to read the federal regs and see what is needed for the machinery you are hauling. If you have a loader tractor you need to secure the bucket separate from the tractor, etc

I am sure there are some nazi states that will want something more than the feds.

Oh, by the way these books can be purchased from JJ Keller or most any truck stop. I carry mine with me when hauling even though I haul my tractor as private in case I need the reference for a diesel bear.
Our drivers all have a copy issued to them.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf 20120228152850609.pdf (123.9 KB, 269 views)
File Type: pdf 20120228152904981.pdf (128.9 KB, 181 views)
File Type: pdf 20120228152925974.pdf (173.1 KB, 156 views)

Last edited by KevinJ; 02-28-2012 at 04:36:22 PM. Reason: add info
Reply With Quote
The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to KevinJ For This Post:
  #8  
Old 02-28-2012, 07:30:15 PM
oldtractors's Avatar
oldtractors oldtractors is offline
Subscriber
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Iowa Falls, Iowa, USA
Posts: 1,621
Thanks: 1,726
Thanked 1,907 Times in 779 Posts
Default Re: Chaining Tractors Down

Not bad. Only took to post #7 before someone posted facts. As you can see above, most of us hauling an M Farmall can get by with two chains, since it is light equipment, not heavy.

Harbor Freight chains are just fine, and marked grade 70. Unmarked chains are also ok, but you will have to go with the grade 30 ratings.
__________________
Jim Evans
Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to oldtractors For This Post:
  #9  
Old 02-28-2012, 08:41:45 PM
KevinJ KevinJ is offline
Subscriber
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Ravenna, Michigan, USA
Posts: 184
Thanks: 13
Thanked 67 Times in 45 Posts
Default Re: Chaining Tractors Down

Quote:
Originally Posted by oldtractors View Post
As you can see above, most of us hauling an M Farmall can get by with two chains, since it is light equipment, not heavy.
I haul an M also and I back it on, always have 2 chains on the front frame to rear of trailer for braking or impact and one or 2 one the other end.

I tend to over secure my load. My chains are all 3/8 gr 70 because I got a deal on some used chains from a divorced trucker!!

Still got several of my gr 43 for hauling lesser cargo.

A pic of the M ready to head out.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	7-15-2011 (3).JPG
Views:	476
Size:	133.9 KB
ID:	129952  
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to KevinJ For This Post:
  #10  
Old 02-28-2012, 09:41:29 PM
OTTO-Sawyer's Avatar
OTTO-Sawyer OTTO-Sawyer is online now
Subscriber
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Scioto Mills, Illinois USA
Posts: 9,041
Thanks: 20,752
Thanked 7,994 Times in 3,788 Posts
Default Re: Chaining Tractors Down

I've always figured too many chains & binders is better than not enough of them.

I used 6 chains and 4 ratchet straps when hauling a big Stover engine from Nebraska back to Freeport Illinois many many years ago. Glad I did, as I came up on a major traffic jam with no warning and was on the brakes hard enough I almost jack-knifed the truck & trailer. Everything stayed put like it should have. I don't remember if there was an accident up ahead, or why traffic was stopped... There weren't any warning signs for road construction or anything, but standing on the brakes at 70MPH, you want a secure load if you expect it to stay in place.

I generally use 4 (or more) chains even when hauling a scrap vehicle to the junk yard. I don't want any surprises half way there.
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to OTTO-Sawyer For This Post:
  #11  
Old 04-14-2012, 04:17:56 AM
busman7
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Chaining Tractors Down

I learned to chain down equipment when moving pipeline equipment in the late 60's in Alberta. Rules were 4 chains & boomers (binders) then, have always done the same no matter how small the tractor, never had a problem.

I get a kick out of the morons who figure one chain & boomer through a clevis on the draw bar of a M + another on the front make for a secure load.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to For This Post:
  #12  
Old 04-14-2012, 06:13:26 AM
pegasuspinto pegasuspinto is offline
Registered-III
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Floyd, AR, USA
Posts: 2,967
Thanks: 340
Thanked 1,421 Times in 925 Posts
Default Re: Chaining Tractors Down

Here's the real deal guys:

Make sure you have no bald or flat tires.
Over secure the load in a visible way.
Make sure ALL lights work. If you have a lot of extra lights, delete them if they are not legally needed-any dead light can be a ticket.
NEVER stop at the scales.
If the DOT nails you for ANY reason your answers are:
"I had no idea, been doing this for years and never stopped"
"I'm hauling MY tractor to/from a show for pleasure" (NEVER let them have any reason to think you are using the tractor for hire/profit of any kind, including prizes of value, never let them think you are moving the tractor for 'hire' or are a tractor broker-once you seem to step over the line from personal to commercial he's got a nice, big, thick and sometimes confusingly worded book to throw at you, and he might put you "Out Of Service" right there and really leave you in a pickle, especially if there is no way on earth you can make the rig legal)

The law of the land is:
"If an officer does pull you over, he shall write you any citation he likes, and if you don't like it you can hire a attorney from your own pocket who may argue said ticket before his cousin, the judge"

I don't know about your areas, but in mine the DOT guys are getting thicker-and the chances of a bored DOT guy pulling you over for a roadside inspection are higher then ever.

Robert
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 04-14-2012, 09:37:30 AM
GEM
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Chaining Tractors Down

In Nebraska, if you run the scales in a pickup pulling a trailer with a lawn mower on it - they will hunt you down and KILL you (figuratively).....

ANY pickup pulling ANY trailer MUST stop at the scales. The fine for running the scale is far worse than stopping. The scales are video monitored - so they know who you are. Signs are posted for miles before the scales, so there is no excuse for not stopping.

The good thing is - there aren't many permanent scales in Nebraska, so it's pretty easy to avoid them.

---------- Post added at 08:37 AM ---------- Previous post was at 08:34 AM ----------

Quote:
Originally Posted by busman7 View Post
I get a kick out of the morons who figure one chain & boomer through a clevis on the draw bar of a M + another on the front make for a secure load.

I know someone who loads his MM 360u onto his trailer, then runs one strap from the rear of the trailer, over the axle, over the loader bucket, and to the front of the trailer. Seen him go 150 miles, one way, like that.....
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 08-08-2014, 10:07:35 PM
IronworkerFXR IronworkerFXR is offline
Subscriber
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Stamford, Connecticut
Posts: 494
Thanks: 3
Thanked 185 Times in 140 Posts
Default Re: Chaining Tractors Down

YUP.......and that's why they go overkill on the honest people
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 08-09-2014, 11:23:00 PM
Freightrain Freightrain is offline
Registered
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Ohio
Posts: 44
Thanks: 5
Thanked 16 Times in 10 Posts
Default Re: Chaining Tractors Down

Here's a story I heard this summer.

Fellow pulling short gooseneck enclosed trailer with a vintage Diamond T pickup in it. Only uses TWO straps(nylon rachet) to hold it(one across front, one across the rearend). Apparently the rear one broke, the truck began banging around in the trailer. By the time they stopped, the truck had broke loose, busted the trailer door open and rolled out into the street!! Luckily some bystanders man handled the truck and got it pushed to the side of the road. No one was hurt, the truck only had minor damage.

I don't get the way some people cheap out and only think two straps are good enough for ANY load. It truly is a scary thing. I like the ones that use those tiny 1" straps to hold more then a bicycle. I can read their mind "well they are rated for 1K lbs each and the car is only 3500#. Ya, okay. Those little bent hooks will not support a car/truck or anything of the sort.

Be safe out there!!!
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 11-26-2016, 06:54:11 AM
ListerDiesel's Avatar
ListerDiesel ListerDiesel is offline
In Memory Of
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Rushden, Northamptonshire, United Kingdom
Posts: 3,616
Thanks: 44
Thanked 2,164 Times in 756 Posts
Default Re: Chaining Tractors Down

We used to use ratchet straps on the Ruston diesel in the back of our trailer, but found that they stretched on a long trip and came loose, so now we use galvanised chain and stainless steel turnbuckles to keep it in place.



Eyenuts are M16, bolted through the trailer chassis, not the decking.

Peter
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to ListerDiesel For This Post:
  #17  
Old 11-26-2016, 11:37:18 AM
Archaeometrist Archaeometrist is offline
Registered-I
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Lakeland, Florida
Posts: 421
Thanks: 109
Thanked 191 Times in 117 Posts
Default Re: Chaining Tractors Down

Several years ago I owned a Sears garden tractor. I learned a big lesson about carrying stuff on a trailer from it.

I had four of those spring- loaded clamping (not ratchet) tiedowns holding it on a trailer. I was taking it to my folk's house to mow their lawn and hit a bump in the road. The tie-downs didn't hold, even though the straps were not only clamped but tied above the clamps. The little tractor ended up rolling across a four-lane road. Luckily nobody hit it (and it wasn't damaged). I just got a big case of red-faced embarrassment.

When I went to get my Struck RS-1000, I had 5 ratchet tie-downs, plus four of the spring-loaded as backups, plus a tarp tied down securely over it. I also pulled off and checked the tiedowns after about 30 minutes of driving - making sure everything was really tight. I REALLY didn't want the Struck to get loose on the interstate. (The trailer also had four substantial sides and the tailgate is solid and latched in place.)

One thing I will be doing to the trailer - they didn't put good tie-down points in it, just some sheet metal handles bolted to the top of the sides (I took the straps past them down to the frame of the trailer). I plan on adding some really secure tie-down points near the floor.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 11-26-2016, 01:26:20 PM
beezerbill beezerbill is offline
Subscriber
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Boulder, Colorado
Posts: 1,171
Thanks: 182
Thanked 627 Times in 422 Posts
Default Re: Chaining Tractors Down

Just another reminder about straps vs. chains - just about anything that could possibly cut or fret through a strap WILL cut or fret through a strap. Metal corners (even ones that don't look sharp) are especially bad. Straps can be useful - just be careful how the load is tied with them and inspect the load frequently.

Oh, and if you feel rationally paranoid, stop before long bridges or tunnels and give the load a thorough check.

Another thing - avoid using cheap, unrated garden variety hardware store chain and tiedown fittings. This stuff is likely to break at the worst possible moment. I've seen the results where a piece of unrated chain was used in an overhead lifting operation during the scrapping of a large machine - the chain broke and dropped the load onto a truck two floors below. No one got hurt but the truck was badly damaged.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to beezerbill For This Post:
  #19  
Old 11-26-2016, 02:08:39 PM
Archaeometrist Archaeometrist is offline
Registered-I
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Lakeland, Florida
Posts: 421
Thanks: 109
Thanked 191 Times in 117 Posts
Default Re: Chaining Tractors Down

Quote:
Originally Posted by beezerbill View Post
just about anything that could possibly cut or fret through a strap WILL cut or fret through a strap.
If you have a strap where the wind can catch it and it starts vibrating, that will do a number on it over time. The shorter the better. If it might be long enough to vibrate, tie a rag to it. That helps to dampen vibrations!

Also, if there is a safety/parking brake on whatever you've got in the trailer, put that brake on (but after you tie the thing down - it can make you think it's tight enough when there is a tiny bit of slack still to be taken up).

Every little bit helps!
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 11-26-2016, 03:44:55 PM
G Willikers G Willikers is offline
Sponsor
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Canada
Posts: 12,978
Thanks: 12,339
Thanked 29,732 Times in 7,500 Posts
Default Re: Chaining Tractors Down

Rule of showing tractors - never follow the truck home that is carrying your prized machine!
Followed the float ( as we call it here) home from a show one night with one of my tractors, a fairly rare one. He hit a RR crossing and started up a rise. I saw my tractor rolling backwards and flashed the lights at him. He pulled over and we checked the chains which were tight. We figured it just rolled back as it had been sitting on the tip of one of its angle cleats. My heart skipped a few on that one. Also, I could see every bump on the road as my tractor bounced its way home.
It always amazes me to see guys chain or strap stuff down with minimal chains. Yet they still have extra chains, binders or straps they could use.
My tractors stay home now. Screw the road hauling nonsense.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

F o r u m Jump

Similar Threads Chosen at Random
Thread Thread Starter F o r u m Replies Last Post
Hauling, chaining steel wheel tractors Brad Kelley Steam Stationary Engines, Traction Engines 85 11-07-2018 03:26:08 PM
Steam TRactors, Engine, Rare TRactors, Vehicles, & MORE AT Auction! Gjere Collection! salvageprincess Live Auctions of Engines, Tractors and Old Iron 4 05-29-2012 01:50:31 AM
Over 720 Different Tractors farmersbase Antique Farm Tractors 4 05-24-2009 02:11:07 PM
Big 4 tractors Wayne Riedlinger Antique Steel Wheel Tractors - Old Iron Lugs and Cleats 11 09-19-2007 01:38:47 AM
What tractors are these? Randy Wells Antique Steel Wheel Tractors - Old Iron Lugs and Cleats 6 12-11-2004 12:08:07 AM


Use "Ctrl" mouse wheel to change screen size.
All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:19:09 PM.

Smokstak and Enginads site search!


All use is subject to our TERMS OF SERVICE
SMOKSTAK® is a Registered Trade Mark - A Community of Antique Engine Enthusiasts
Copyright © 2000 - 2019 by Harry Matthews P.O. Box 5612 - Sarasota, FL 34277