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Generators & Electric Motors General Discussion

Nice big old Fan re-powered with Direct Current Motor


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  #1  
Old 09-30-2019, 12:43:44 AM
Vanman Vanman is offline
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Default Nice big old Fan re-powered with Direct Current Motor

Here’s a little project I’m working on. Have had this good sized fan for a long time, and have used it a lot. It’s got a 19-1/2” cast aluminum blade, a heavy cast iron base, and is originally powered by a single speed, four pole, 1/4 hp Delco split phase motor. At 1750 rpm it is zipping right along, and moves a lot of air. Great for construction ventilation, but pretty noisy. So I am going to repower it. I am going to be building a motor coach, and it is going to have a 110 ~ 125 volt, direct current electrical system. So I picked up this direct current motor. It’s a 1/6 hp Bodine, 1140 rpm, 230 volt, compound wound. While I had it apart to clean it up, I brought out two more leads, so I can connect the field for full excitation at 115 volt, or weakened by running it on 115 while connected for 230 volt. Because fan hp varies as the cube of the speed, the motor has plenty of power to drive it, even with half voltage on the armature, at well less than nameplate current. I can even further weaken the field for more speed. At the same time, with the high resistance field connected in series with the armature, it is capable of very slow speed, making a nice, silent breeze, taking only 5 watts. I need to figure out how to polish up the aluminum blade.

Keith
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  #2  
Old 09-30-2019, 11:53:32 AM
Railroads Railroads is offline
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Default Re: Nice big old Fan re-powered with Direct Current Motor

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vanman View Post
Here’s a little project I’m working on. Have had this good sized fan for a long time, and have used it a lot. It’s got a 19-1/2” cast aluminum blade, a heavy cast iron base, and is originally powered by a single speed, four pole, 1/4 hp Delco split phase motor. At 1750 rpm it is zipping right along, and moves a lot of air. Great for construction ventilation, but pretty noisy. So I am going to repower it. I am going to be building a motor coach, and it is going to have a 110 ~ 125 volt, direct current electrical system. So I picked up this direct current motor. It’s a 1/6 hp Bodine, 1140 rpm, 230 volt, compound wound. While I had it apart to clean it up, I brought out two more leads, so I can connect the field for full excitation at 115 volt, or weakened by running it on 115 while connected for 230 volt. Because fan hp varies as the cube of the speed, the motor has plenty of power to drive it, even with half voltage on the armature, at well less than nameplate current. I can even further weaken the field for more speed. At the same time, with the high resistance field connected in series with the armature, it is capable of very slow speed, making a nice, silent breeze, taking only 5 watts. I need to figure out how to polish up the aluminum blade.

Keith
Keith, You going for a steam punk themed bus here?

Robert
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Old 09-30-2019, 01:19:38 PM
Vanman Vanman is offline
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Default Re: Nice big old Fan re-powered with Direct Current Motor

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Keith, You going for a steam punk themed bus here?

Robert
I suppose it could be called that! Though at 1955, it’s a little later than steam’s heyday. I want to make it as faithful as I can to the technology of the era though.
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  #4  
Old 09-30-2019, 01:39:00 PM
Tracy T Tracy T is online now
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Default Re: Nice big old Fan re-powered with Direct Current Motor

just mount that fan pointed out the back of the bus and save your diesel!
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Old 10-01-2019, 12:17:39 AM
AngrySailor AngrySailor is offline
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Default Re: Nice big old Fan re-powered with Direct Current Motor

I did some polishing a while back, I used a small 2” or so backing pad from a head light polishing kit and cut Velcro backed discs from 6” DA discs. Good selection of grits available and the small pad let me get in tight spots. The head light kit came with pads 800-1200 grit if I recall. I started with 120 then Stepped up to 1200 wet before hit it with the polish. It was stainless tubing and came out like chrome.
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