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Bulding a Barn / Shop


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  #21  
Old 12-04-2017, 09:37:16 PM
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Tim B Tim B is offline
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Default Re: Bulding a Barn / Shop

Always remember... Size matters! Our garage/shops are never, never big enough. But the smaller you can get by with, the easier it is to cool and to heat and to light. Save the warehouse size building for storage. Besides if you sit "stuff" down and forget where you left them like I do, it will be easier to find in a small shop. Good luck and post some pictures of your progress.
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  #22  
Old 12-05-2017, 01:32:34 AM
LCJudge LCJudge is offline
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Default Re: Bulding a Barn / Shop

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Originally Posted by s100 View Post
Everyone seems to be making grand plans for your building but no one seems to be picking up on a key point: The building is TINY. 24x30 isn't much more than a two car garage. If you can pack a wood shop into that space, making allowances for wood storage, a finishing area and a utility room (heater, air compressor, etc) plus of course the work benches and machines, you will be lucky to have much room left over to maneuver your projects around. Unless of course you are making doll houses and weigh 90 pounds, in which case you will probably be OK.
Well, you're exactly right about size. No matter how big it is, it will never be big enough! I've got 3 buildings behind the house and all 3 are brimming full of junk. The wife says no more buildings so I'm beginning to buy the pallet racking and am going vertical inside the buildings!
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  #23  
Old 12-05-2017, 08:40:01 AM
dependable dependable is offline
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Default Re: Bulding a Barn / Shop

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The wife says no more buildings[/SIZE]
Nice looking place.

How about a tidy row of shipping containers? Can always sell them (if they ever get empty again). haha
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  #24  
Old 12-05-2017, 09:43:33 AM
SteveMc SteveMc is offline
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Default Re: Bulding a Barn / Shop

Be sure to take into account where your seasonal winds come from and how the sun hits the building. Placing windows, doors, heating system and office can really make a difference in comfort and cost. I was able to talk my bride into building the shop before the house. She was so happy for me.
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  #25  
Old 12-05-2017, 11:02:45 AM
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Default Re: Bulding a Barn / Shop

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Nice looking place.

How about a tidy row of shipping containers? Can always sell them (if they ever get empty again). haha

Thanks. Well, that's an idea I hadn't thought of. In the arrows on the photo they point toward rows of engine trucks stacked on one another. I wished they were all inside a building (or container). About 3 years ago the wife came out and looked at all junk around the buildings and said "with all this stuff you've got around here, you need to get rid of a bunch of junk......either that or you're going to have to build another building". About 3 weeks later a couple of trucks pulled in the drive and she asked "what do these folks want". I told here "they're here to start another building".....well, that didn't go over real well but I did get the building built.

I've got a gravel pad at the left of the back building that I use to park trailers on.....maybe I could park a few shipping containers on it too??.....
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  #26  
Old 12-05-2017, 11:45:17 AM
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Wink Re: Bulding a Barn / Shop

^ Send her on a two week vacay somewhere then quickly put another building to the left of the existings. She won't see it and after 6 months she'll ask if that building is new.
Naah, it's been there forever.
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  #27  
Old 12-06-2017, 01:35:45 PM
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Default Re: Bulding a Barn / Shop

I've got pex in floor heating and waste lines roughed in for the future. One thing I didn't do that I regret was put any anchor bolts in for my big emery grinder or vises. I can't drill into my floor to mount anchor bolts now for fear of drilling into the pex.
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  #28  
Old 12-06-2017, 05:18:07 PM
Pete Spaco Pete Spaco is offline
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Default Re: Bulding a Barn / Shop --- I can't drill into my floor

"I can't drill into my floor "

I wonder if you could rent or borrow a thermal imager and run really hot liquid through the pex, and quickly determine where the pex is before the whole floor heats up.

Pete Stanaitis
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  #29  
Old 12-06-2017, 07:06:02 PM
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Default Re: Bulding a Barn / Shop --- I can't drill into my floor

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"I can't drill into my floor "

I wonder if you could rent or borrow a thermal imager and run really hot liquid through the pex, and quickly determine where the pex is before the whole floor heats up.

Pete Stanaitis
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I bet with some patience you could do it with one of those Harbor Freight, non-contact thermometers. If you were in an area where the pex loops to change direction it might be a bit tricky. In the middle of the field where they all run parallel it shouldn't be too tough.
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  #30  
Old 12-07-2017, 11:08:57 AM
Pete Spaco Pete Spaco is offline
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Default Re: Bulding a Barn / Shop

Maybe this is overkill, but---
If you were pretty sure you wanted the tool in a certain place, maybe you could epoxy a steel plate to the floor then drill and tap that plate for mounting the tool.
Over 30 years ago, I mounted a 6 foot high, 2000 pound trip hammer to the floor using a half inch thick piece of conveyor belting as a shock absorber . I "glued" the pad to the floor with RTV and then "glued" the power hammer to the pad. It hasn't gone anywhere.

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  #31  
Old 12-07-2017, 02:22:09 PM
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Default Re: Bulding a Barn / Shop

Quote:
Originally Posted by LCJudge View Post
Well, you're exactly right about size. No matter how big it is, it will never be big enough! I've got 3 buildings behind the house and all 3 are brimming full of junk. The wife says no more buildings so I'm beginning to buy the pallet racking and am going vertical inside the buildings!
Tommy, just start piling the stuff up around the house and she will let you build another building!
Nice looking place you have there!
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  #32  
Old 12-08-2017, 04:33:29 PM
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Default Re: Bulding a Barn / Shop

Wow,lots of good ideas here. Biggest change I would have done on mine, would have been to make it wider and shorter so it would have been easier to add on as money and time permitted.
Didn't say that so well but I am sure you guys get my meaning!
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  #33  
Old 12-08-2017, 06:38:38 PM
Jake Jacobs Jake Jacobs is offline
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Default Re: Bulding a Barn / Shop

To locate pex when it has heated water in it just spray the floor with a co2 fire extinguisher and you will find the tubing.
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  #34  
Old 12-29-2017, 11:18:10 AM
FarmallTractors FarmallTractors is offline
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Default Re: Bulding a Barn / Shop

I added a upstairs to mine have not had time to finish railing here's some pictures I to would have went 10' wider mine is 40'x60'x16'4" the bigger it is the more stuff I seem to aquireClick image for larger version

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  #35  
Old 12-29-2017, 12:23:02 PM
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Default Re: Bulding a Barn / Shop

I like the mezzanine all around. I still gives you a high bay without building to extreme.
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  #36  
Old 01-06-2018, 05:14:44 PM
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Default Re: Bulding a Barn / Shop

Well, I still have not poured my floor yet. Its been too cold to do it. I missed my opportunity before the weather turned. Even down here in Tennessee its freezing. So I am thinking about putting in some white oak sleepers on top of the gravel and then some t and g yellow pine or some other hard wood over the sleepers. I know, it sounds crazy, but it might be more comfortable to work on and easier to fasten stuff to. That's all the old barns had anyway. Of course the bugs could eat it, or it could rot, etc, etc. I am thinking with my luck the weather will warm up and then the rain will come and I wont be able to get a concrete truck in here to pour it anyway. Am I crazy to put a wood floor in? whataya think ?
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  #37  
Old 01-06-2018, 06:25:02 PM
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Default Re: Bulding a Barn / Shop

just a pole building. I have poles, purlins a and a roof on but no siding. I left the siding off so it would be easier to pour and finish the slab. I suppose I could put on the siding and heat the place to pour the slab.
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  #38  
Old 01-07-2018, 12:20:32 AM
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Default Re: Bulding a Barn / Shop

I was originally concerned about having pex embedded into the slab on my workshop. My basement and south porch have PEX embedded, but I decided to do an experiment in an outbuilding, and it worked out nicely, so I'll be doing same in my workshops:

Put down the insulation layer (Formular 250 EPS foam), then an inch or so of lime... then lay down the pex, then put more lime or sand... then spread it flat, compact it smooth, then pour the concrete ABOVE it. Since the pex is above the insulation, it WILL heat the floor... but the slab will NOT be affected by pex.

It DOES require that there be walls around the edges, otherwise rodents will chew pathways into the foam and cause settling issues.

I insulate the outer walls down to the footing, so that the foundation, and all the soil under the floor, are all part of the thermal mass...
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  #39  
Old 01-20-2018, 01:33:04 PM
ihredo4 ihredo4 is offline
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Default Re: Bulding a Barn / Shop

alternate electric circuits along the wall. First outlet = Circuit 1, 2nd outlet = Circuit 2, 3rd outlet = circuit 1, etc.... that way when you plug into adjacent outlets your using 2 circuits to power the tools.
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Old 01-21-2018, 01:54:23 PM
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Default Re: Bulding a Barn / Shop

Hey Mikey-

I was working on the design of my shop building, trying to sort out some problems and realized that my solution might work for you as well... but yours is already started, so here's an adaptation:

Dig a foundation wall AWAY from the side of the poles... go out six feet at least, mebbie more. Pour your walls THERE- away from the posts. Build walls up from there, and install a lean-to roof from your posts outward.

By doing this, the moisture from roof stays away from your posts... keeps the post bottoms dry. It gives you a rodent-seal. It doesn't support any substantial load, and if it gets a little frost lift, it won't have any impact on the main structure.

When you pour your floors, put a form (round or square) around each post... about a foot... and also leave about six inches of gap between your walls and the slab. Pour the slab and finish it however you like, and once that's done, strip the forms around the posts, and fill the holes to about 1.5" with sand... then mix and pour sak-crete or grout into the holes and wall-gap to 'finish'. By doing this, if the slab or posts move, it will prevent your slab from breaking posts or cracking up your slab. The grout will give instead.

When I pour my slabs, I'll be doing this, but I'll also be running my PEX along the spaces so that I can break the grout out and repair the PEX feeders if I need to.
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