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Architecture of the Industrial Revolution and our Forefatherís Steam Engines


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  #1  
Old 03-15-2007, 10:57:41 PM
Jeff Smith Jeff Smith is offline
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Default Architecture of the Industrial Revolution and our Forefatherís Steam Engines

"A Tribute to the Architecture of the Industrial Revolution that protected our Forefatherís Glorious Steam Engines"


This is a thread that I have often thought about but have never taken the time to start; not only do I find the stationary steam engines our forefatherís designed and created interesting, but I also appreciate the architecture of many of the buildings that housed these magnificent engines. I have taken many photos over the years not only of the engines, but of the buildings themselves, and I would like to post some photos for the folks that can appreciate these fine works of art in a world today where society has to knock everything down instead of re-developing a blighted area and incorporating the existing structures into the overall master plan.

Jeff Smith
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  #2  
Old 03-16-2007, 12:35:13 PM
The Eccentric Crank
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Default Re: Architecture of the Industrial Revolution and our Forefatherís Steam Engines

Jeff,

Keep the pictures coming. Please let us know where the buildings are located and what they are being used for today.

Dan Donaldson (aka The Eccentric Crank)
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  #3  
Old 03-16-2007, 12:49:49 PM
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Default Re: Architecture of the Industrial Revolution and our Forefatherís Steam Engines

I agree. Keep those photos coming. Jeff if you would be so kind; I would like to chat with you off line. Please contact me.

dusty.
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  #4  
Old 03-16-2007, 01:49:16 PM
Jeff Smith Jeff Smith is offline
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Default Re: Architecture of the Industrial Revolution and our Forefatherís Steam Engines

http://www.smokstak.com/forum/showthread.php?t=36315

I knew I forgot something in the first post, the location! The building in post #1 is located at the Railroad Museum in downtown Savanna, Ga and houses the steam engine in post #1 of the link above. If anyone is every traveling to Florida or Georgia on vacation and likes steam engines, old machine tools, patterns and foundry work, etc. it is well worth the short detour from I-95 to see this museum. I will never have a problem going back to this museum from the "spouse" viewpoint either due to the quaint elegance of downtown Savanna, and of course............................................ ..shopping.

Jeff Smith
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  #5  
Old 03-26-2007, 07:37:48 PM
Jeff Smith Jeff Smith is offline
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Default Re: Architecture of the Industrial Revolution and our Forefatherís Steam Engines

This past weekend I flew to West Virginia to visit family and as part of the trip I asked my father to take me to the Easton Roller Mill that he has assisted with for many years. It is located in Monongalia County, WV and is registered with the National Park Service Ė National Register of Historic Places and also the WV State registry. The actual date of construction is an interesting topic because the registry has it listed as 1870, but I have found many local references including historians and WVU library archives that list the construction date as1864; if 1864 is the actual date that means the mill was constructed just one year after West Virginia became a state (1863). Other than the light fixtures, this mill has a feeling as though you are in another time period once entering.

This mill was built by Henry Koontz and could grind 120 bu. of grain daily. The stone burrs were replaced with iron rollers in 1894, improving the output and quality of the final product. The mill was owned by several different people until consumer habits and reduced local grain supply forced it to close in 1930. The steam engine is in the basement and is a Lane & Bodley Co. from Cincinnati, Ohio and the crank disk is just a little over 2' in diameter and the flywheel is +/- 8í in diameter. The boiler no longer exists nor does the boiler room, but the stack is still in place and a small building with an extremely large air compressor has been constructed where the boiler room was and the compressor will slowly operate the engine approximately 100 (very slow) revolutions before ďlosing steamĒ, and can operate the engine only and not the complete mill. My father has lived in the area since 1963, and the engine and basement of the building has been under water by severe flooding at least twice and he has had the head, steam chest cover, and many other important items of the engine off/apart to clean and remove the mud and siltation to oil, grease and lubricate the engine properly to protect and preserve it for many years to come.

In the past, the local preservation society has had a few ďMill DaysĒ, and a few local engine collectors were asked to bring engines and related items to operate for that day. My father has attended most, if not all of them and has even been on the front page of the news paper with display. During those small festivals, the steam engine was also operated on air as a demonstration. Unfortunately, many of the participants of the previous festivals and many of the volunteers are no longer able to participate due to aging and I hope that there will be some new younger engine enthusiasts in the area to help protect and preserve such a wonderful icon of local history. This mill is an historic relic of the community, and an excellent example of a steam powered roller mill representational of the time period and deserves to live on for future generations to see.

Jeff Smith

More information can be found here:

http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/ampage...+@band(WV0138))

http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/ampage...+@band(WV0138))

http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/ampage...+@band(WV0138))
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Old 03-26-2007, 07:38:50 PM
Jeff Smith Jeff Smith is offline
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Default Re: Architecture of the Industrial Revolution and our Forefatherís Steam Engines

Lane & Bodley Co. Steam Engine
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Old 03-26-2007, 07:40:09 PM
Jeff Smith Jeff Smith is offline
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Default Re: Architecture of the Industrial Revolution and our Forefatherís Steam Engines

Inside the mill.
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Old 03-26-2007, 07:41:09 PM
Jeff Smith Jeff Smith is offline
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Default Re: Architecture of the Industrial Revolution and our Forefatherís Steam Engines

Inside the mill #2.
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Last edited by Jeff Smith; 03-26-2007 at 08:01:08 PM. Reason: add 2 photos
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  #9  
Old 03-26-2007, 08:15:48 PM
Jeff Smith Jeff Smith is offline
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Default Re: Architecture of the Industrial Revolution and our Forefatherís Steam Engines

After visiting the mill many times over the years, a few items I would love to see the historical society consider would be the rebuilding the boiler room and machine shop, and placing the overhead electric underground. I think the utilities going into the mill really detract from the elegance of the architecture.

Just once I would love to have however many traction engines and portables hauled in from the nearest shows to see the steam engine operate under steam and run the complete mill as it was in its heyday. That would be a day for lots of video footage and maybe even content for the discovery channel.

Jeff Smith
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Old 03-26-2007, 10:01:09 PM
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Default Re: Architecture of the Industrial Revolution and our Forefatherís Steam Engines

Great photos Jeff. I happened to notice this afternoon, that there is a stak member who has some photos of the pumping station in Buffalo. Wayne Grenning is his name. Though the pumping station was built circa 1915 an not of the Victorian Industrial era, it has that feel from the photos. Check out his gallery. The pumping station is complete just as the day they turned off the taps. Very impressive. There was/is a very good program on BBC that led one through an indepth look at the Industrial Revolution during the Victorian Era. Very good program, wish I could remember the title.

Robert
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Old 04-08-2007, 12:40:40 PM
G Willikers G Willikers is offline
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Default Re: Architecture of the Industrial Revolution and our Forefatherís Steam Engines

The city of Hamilton, Ontario is on the western tip of Lake Ontario about an hour from Buffalo or Toronto. One of the industrial jewels there is the 1850s vintage water pumping station. The buildings are beautiful and there is a permanent museum there now - Hamilton Museum of Steam and Technology. They have a website but I don't know enough to create a link to it here? There is a lot of other stuff there - Sawyer-Massey steam roller, etc..
The pumping engines were built at the John Gartshore Co. of nearby Dundas, Ontario. There are 2 engines, huge walking beam style. The engines are 45 feet high, 70 tons each and 22 ton flywheels. They pumped water from Lake Ontario for the city. They don't run them under steam anymore but have it set up so they can roll them over via an electric motor. It is something to see!
The black and white picture shows a split view of outside and a bit inside the engine room. I will have to get down and get some better pictures of the machinery, unless someone else on here can send some in?
G.
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Old 04-08-2007, 05:12:57 PM
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Thumbs up Re: Architecture of the Industrial Revolution and our Forefatherís Steam Engines

Quote:
Originally Posted by G Willikers View Post
The city of Hamilton, Ontario is on the western tip of Lake Ontario about an hour from Buffalo or Toronto. One of the industrial jewels there is the 1850s vintage water pumping station. The buildings are beautiful and there is a permanent museum there now - Hamilton Museum of Steam and Technology. They have a website but I don't know enough to create a link to it here? There is a lot of other stuff there - Sawyer-Massey steam roller, etc..
The pumping engines were built at the John Gartshore Co. of nearby Dundas, Ontario. There are 2 engines, huge walking beam style. The engines are 45 feet high, 70 tons each and 22 ton flywheels. They pumped water from Lake Ontario for the city. They don't run them under steam anymore but have it set up so they can roll them over via an electric motor. It is something to see!
The black and white picture shows a split view of outside and a bit inside the engine room. I will have to get down and get some better pictures of the machinery, unless someone else on here can send some in?
G.
G.,
I visited this pumping station back in 1998. It was on a monday, day after the Steam Era in Milton, and it was a bank holiday and the pumping station was closed. By coincidence, one of the guides (I still remember his name, Mr Woods) showed up, he had to check something. He was so kind to give us a tour in the museum and let the beam engines make a few revolutions! I have pictures but need to scan them first. I recall that they kept records of the stop positions of the beams after each demonstration, must have something to do with the wear of the huge bearings.
It was one of the highlights of our 10-day tour in PA, NY and Ontario.
Best regards
Marcel
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Old 04-09-2007, 01:45:12 AM
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Here is a very nice one in Holland:

http://www.museumdecruquius.nl/

Best regards
Marcel
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Old 04-15-2007, 09:07:01 AM
m_thompson m_thompson is offline
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Default Re: Architecture of the Industrial Revolution and our Forefatherís Steam Engines

The Armington Sims factory is now artists lofts.
http://users.ids.net/~newsm/steam-en...ms-factory.jpg

The Greene and Rice & Sargent factory (Providence Engineering Works factory) is now mixed office,residential, and retail space.
http://users.ids.net/~newsm/steam-en...ineering-1.jpg

The B.F Sturtevant factory is now the repair shop for the MBTA.
http://users.ids.net/~newsm/steam-en...nt-factory.jpg
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Old 04-15-2007, 09:40:32 AM
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Default Re: Architecture of the Industrial Revolution and our Forefatherís Steam Engines

The neat thing about the Crquius pumping station in Holland is that my Father who is 83 years old used to ride his bike from his house in Harrlem Holland with his freinds to watch it operate when he was a kid. Then when I was a kid in the 1960,s I used to ride my bike to our local ice house in Huntington Long Island to watch the Delavernge engine run the ammonia compressor for refrigeration.Then in the 1980s my kids got to watch an Atlas diesel running with its compressor at the ice plant in Montauk Long Island.We used to stop to get ice on the way to the campground on summer vacation out there. The ice plant donated the Atlas to our local club [LIAPA.com]and we run it at our show.
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Old 04-15-2007, 11:26:50 AM
Coen Verwer Coen Verwer is offline
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Default Re: Architecture of the Industrial Revolution and our Forefatherís Steam Engines

The Cruquius pumping station is a nice museum, the museum houses a few other stationary steam engines. The main engine is running since the last 2 years, sadly he runs on a hydraulic system, steam was too much for the building. I live in the Haarlemmermeer (polder) where the 3 Cornwall pumps pumped untill 1932, the other 2 pumping stations are still in service running on big Brons and Caterpillar engines.

Coen
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Old 03-03-2009, 12:31:49 PM
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Default Re: Architecture of the Industrial Revolution and our Forefatherís Steam Engines

Quote:
Originally Posted by G Willikers View Post
The city of Hamilton, Ontario is on the western tip of Lake Ontario about an hour from Buffalo or Toronto. One of the industrial jewels there is the 1850s vintage water pumping station. The buildings are beautiful and there is a permanent museum there now - Hamilton Museum of Steam and Technology. They have a website but I don't know enough to create a link to it here? There is a lot of other stuff there - Sawyer-Massey steam roller, etc..
The pumping engines were built at the John Gartshore Co. of nearby Dundas, Ontario. There are 2 engines, huge walking beam style. The engines are 45 feet high, 70 tons each and 22 ton flywheels. They pumped water from Lake Ontario for the city. They don't run them under steam anymore but have it set up so they can roll them over via an electric motor. It is something to see!
The black and white picture shows a split view of outside and a bit inside the engine room. I will have to get down and get some better pictures of the machinery, unless someone else on here can send some in?
G.
Here's the link:

http://www.myhamilton.ca/myhamilton/...s/SteamMuseum/

and I scanned a sectional drawing of the Pumping Station.
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Old 03-05-2009, 07:24:50 AM
Fred Cooper Fred Cooper is offline
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Default Re: Architecture of the Industrial Revolution and our Forefatherís Steam Engines

http://www.croftonbeamengines.org/about.html

Have a look at the above site. The pumps are about 20 miles from us.
Enjoy,
Fred
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Old 04-09-2009, 03:59:06 PM
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Default Re: Architecture of the Industrial Revolution and our Forefatherís Steam Engines

Has anyone ever visited the Chicago Water Works Tower? Is it worth it?
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Old 04-09-2009, 05:38:26 PM
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Default Re: Architecture of the Industrial Revolution and our Forefatherís Steam Engines

Now that it is back online; this would be a good place to remind/tell about my "Steam Lizards Virtual Museum":

http://www.steampump.org/gallery/museum

It highlights many of the early steam pump builders, including the people and works that made it happen. It also has a "Hall of Nameplates"; and a gallery of linotype drawings and photographs of long gone steam pumps.

-James Hefner
Hebrews 10:20a
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