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Steam Stationary Engines, Traction Engines, Steam Boats Antique steam engines, their boilers, pumps, gauges, whistles and other related things that make them run.

Steam Stationary Engines, Traction Engines, Steam Boats

Lets see some unique steam tools


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  #1  
Old 01-20-2019, 09:58:24 PM
MFaris MFaris is offline
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Default Lets see some unique steam tools

The talk about prossers in the N&S Broderick boiler thread got me thinking about boiler tools and gages (not pressure gauges but tool gages). I know you guys and gals have some cool tools hidden away, so lets see them! Staybolt taps, beading tools, air hammers, rivet snaps, safety valve lift gages, prossers, tube rollers, etc, etc, etc.

There are a lot of steam tools people walk right past at flea markets and auctions because they don't know what they're looking at so lets use this as a way of expanding our collective knowledge!

I'm going to start this off with a very unique gage! This is a steam locomotive valve gear calculator for use when setting valves and quartering wheels. This gage will also work on any other type of two cylinder steam engine equipped with an outside valve gear.

Your turn!





---------- Post added at 05:58:24 PM ---------- Previous post was at 05:36:26 PM ----------

Hers's another one.

This is a locomotive inspectors' hammer, used to tap staybolts, rivets, and nuts and bolts during inspection. It's shop built and has marks turned on it for measuring wheel wear and other unknown things....
It's about 18" long.



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Old 01-21-2019, 12:46:38 AM
David Hoover David Hoover is offline
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Default Re: Lets see some unique steam tools

This should probably go here, just in case someone wants to do some calculating....https://archive.org/details/steamconsumption00clayrich
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Old 01-21-2019, 01:53:34 AM
Oilpulled Oilpulled is offline
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Default Re: Lets see some unique steam tools

Tell me how many, if any operators of steam engines at shows understand this or have ever run an indicator diagram and measured it for their or for any engine?
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Old 01-21-2019, 02:31:38 AM
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JBoogie JBoogie is offline
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Default Re: Lets see some unique steam tools

Bruce Babcock has taken cards on a few engines around Ohio. NTA has also had economy runs which I think are very interesting and would like to see again. It would be especially neat to take indicator cards/water rate/#'s of coal/hr before and after a restoration.
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Old 01-21-2019, 03:21:21 AM
George Hoffman George Hoffman is offline
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Default Re: Lets see some unique steam tools

Here is the Prosser for installing copper ferrules. This one is for 2 inch flues in 1/2 inch tube sheet.
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Old 01-21-2019, 03:31:55 AM
George Hoffman George Hoffman is offline
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Default Re: Lets see some unique steam tools

Here is a modern tool commonly referred to as a Hole Hog. Used for trimming off boiler tubes to a uniform length prior to beading.
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Old 01-21-2019, 09:42:05 AM
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JBoogie JBoogie is offline
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Default Re: Lets see some unique steam tools

Commonly called a hole hog? Well not around here, or even on google. That would be quite the misnomer since its doesn't do anything to the hole.
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Old 01-21-2019, 09:50:03 AM
Joe K Joe K is offline
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Default Re: Lets see some unique steam tools

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oilpulled View Post
Tell me how many, if any operators of steam engines at shows understand this or have ever run an indicator diagram and measured it for their or for any engine?
Last of those who used the "Heat Lab" in any meaningful way.

Troy-Engberg vertical engine, about 7x8. Separate shell & tube condenser which used water impounded in the lab weir/concrete trench system as the heat sink. Steam from the University Heating plant which the plant had to raise its steam pressure in order for us to have sufficient pressure. And a Maihak indicator/two way valve.

Power developed by the engine was measured with a water cooled prony brake.

Interesting start to the lab. Professor says steam pressure is up, here (pointing) is the indicating gauge. Study out the piping and I'll be down in a hour and we can get started. (all he said)

I found the circulating water pump for the condenser, so I lined that up and pulled a vacuum using the air eductor to prime the condenser and then started the pump. Now we have a place to put the heat.

Steam powered condenser vacuum jet pump. Similar to the eductor but larger and exhaust went to the roof I gathered. I then started that and was pleased to see the condenser shell vacuum starting to drop down. Some more vents/drains found open which were closed.

Then I traced out the steam lines to the engine, brought steam up to the throttle valve blowing out lines as required, and opened the throttle and drains on the engine. Now we have the heat!

Then I started the engine slowly and blowing down the cylinder as required. I had never started this engine before under these circumstances and wasn't exactly sure what would happen.

There was a steam separator before the engine (long steam line underground from the heating plant I guess) and I saw by the gauge glass that it needed blowing down before we got too far too fast. So we blew the separator down to the drain trench. That made me feel better about the engine.

About then the Professor came down the stairs and looking at the hot water circulating in the floor trenches/weir system and the humidity in the air realized what we had done.

You could see his eyes following around the room repeating in his mind our valve line-ups as we found them. He referred to a book with notes in the margin. Finally - ending at the steam separator he asked - "Did you blow down the steam separator at some time in the warm-up?" We replied in the affirmative.

He then handed us the Laboratory Data Sheets and the Instruction Book (margin notes intact) on how to set the lab up for using the steam engine. "Well, you boys seem to know what you're doing - good luck and I'll be reviewing your results."

A warning there...he went back upstairs.

We did the engine test per the protocol and did get an "A" on the lab. My lab associate (A 4.0+ Doctorate in Engineering to be) got a "B" on his report, and I got an A+. We both averaged out to an "A" which we shared as grade overall. My 4.0 lab buddy was ever so pissed off because he ALWAYS got an A+ on engineering theory. He was book smart - no doubt. I hope he felt better when the grades were averaged.

I don't think the steam engine was ever used again. The heat lab is today still in its original location but the steam engine was only "holding on" at my 20th reunion (1997.) The Heat Lab Professor is now dead of liver disease - he a tea-totaller. Later I heard from a classmate the engine was available to be bought. I declined the thought.

He who dies with the most toys doesn't necessarily win.

But - what an experience - and the look on that Professor's face.

PRICELESS

Some time I'll tell my story of piping in a 6" brass steam whistle into the heating steam supply in my dorm room - and the results on a cold winter's morning in Vermont.

I was always an "engineering loose cannon" at Vermont's Private Military College.

Joe K
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Old 01-21-2019, 10:23:25 AM
MFaris MFaris is offline
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Default Re: Lets see some unique steam tools

Quote:
Originally Posted by JBoogie View Post
Commonly called a hole hog? Well not around here, or even on google. That would be quite the misnomer since its doesn't do anything to the hole.
The mfg refers to themselves or their tools as Mill hog https://www.google.com/url?q=http://...DQkOU5E-QkHow5. And the tool rental outfits around here call them hole hogs...
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Old 01-21-2019, 06:14:50 PM
George Hoffman George Hoffman is offline
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Default Re: Lets see some unique steam tools

Quote:
Originally Posted by JBoogie View Post
Commonly called a hole hog? Well not around here, or even on google. That would be quite the misnomer since its doesn't do anything to the hole.
Call it what you want. United Rentals must have it all wrong then It's still a great tool. Or is it a portable mill? You figure.
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