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Antique Steel Wheel Tractors - Old Iron Lugs and Cleats Photos and information about antique steel wheeled farm tractors. This is where to find the heaviest of Old Iron tractors.

Antique Steel Wheel Tractors - Old Iron Lugs and Cleats

Vintage Tractor Fun Facts


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  #11  
Old 07-09-2018, 03:12:58 PM
Wayne Riedlinger Wayne Riedlinger is offline
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Default Re: Vintage Tractor Fun Facts

Wasnt the D19 Alis the first tractor with a turbocharger
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Old 07-09-2018, 04:00:49 PM
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Russ Hamm Russ Hamm is offline
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Default Re: Vintage Tractor Fun Facts

Some interesting reading about the tractor and harvestor wars;
"During 1918 there were 133,000 tractors made in the United States. Ford had already usurped Harvester’s leadership, International was second, and Case third. The expected drop in the war-time demand did not eventuate, and production mounted rapidly to the astonishing total of 203,000 machines in 1920. By this time Ford was far in the lead and was making several times as many as Harvester. For the next year or two, three-quarters of all tractors made were Fordsons. During the period of depression, sales fell off to a quarter, inventories of materials and unsold tractors were huge and high-priced, and the prospects were gloomy. Then, early in 1922, Henry Ford cut the price of tractors.
"That February morning is another of the many business hours I treasure in my memory. I had taken Mr. Legge, the Company’s beloved and hard-boiled general manager, on a visit to the new motor-truck installation at Springfield Works. As we were arguing some problem which then seemed important, the telephone rang—Chicago wished to speak to Mr. Legge. We could, of course, hear only his side of the conversation. There was much talk from the other end, and then an explosion from Alex: 'What? What’s that? How much? Two hundred and thirty dollars? Well I’ll be . . . What’ll we do about it. Do? Why, damn it all—meet him, of course! We’re going to stay in the tractor business. Yes, cut two hundred and thirty dollars. Both models—yes, both. And say, listen, make it good! We’ll throw in a plow as well!'"
By the time of this phone conversation, Ford’s production rate was filling his lots with unsold tractors. He had to move them! And, rather than lose its place in a business it had pioneered, Harvester rose to meet Ford’s challenge by also selling at less than cost. The winner, of course, was the farmer. With the Fordson selling for as low as $395, power farming was now within reach of all but the smallest farmer. Harvester countered with their trusty Titan 10-20 and their newer International 8-16 (based loosely on an International motor truck). But even with Legge’s $230 price cut, the IH tractors still cost twice as much as the Fordson.
Following tactics learned in the Great Harvester Wars of the 1890s, when a Harvester salesman learned of a pending Fordson sale, he challenged the farmer and the Fordson dealer to a competition. Each tractor would pull a two-bottom plow with 14-inch bottoms through whatever conditions the farmer chose. If the International tractor outperformed the Fordson, the farmer could change his mind about the purchase and decide to buy the IH tractor instead. Although the IH cost almost twice as much as the Fordson, the deal included a free plow. In many conditions, the lightweight Fordson would demonstrate a marked lack of traction. In other conditions, the Fordson’s performance was not all that bad, and the IH tractors ended up looking somewhat dated and obsolete next to the carlike Fordson.
Competition with the Fordson, however, prompted International Harvester to rapidly adopt automotive production methods and standardize its parts. It also instigated the further development of the power take-off (PTO) and the application of industry standards for things like spline sizes and belt speeds. The PTO gave the tractor more versatility around the farm. The idea of an all-purpose tractor wasn’t entirely new. The introduction of the Moline Universal in 1917 is a case in point. But the giant step in power farming occurred when International Harvester introduced the McCormick-Deering Farmall in 1924.

The Great Harvester War
In his book The Century of the Reaper, Cyrus McCormick III recounts a commercial fight that took place in the late 1880s near Pomeroy, Iowa. The tale comes from the report of the McCormick general agent.
“Our dealer telegraphed me that Champion had pulled into the same field where he had sold an eight-foot McCormick binder and were trying to break up the sale.
“When I got there, the farmer was having trouble with our machine, and the Champion boys were giving him plenty of poison about it and me. I got the machine fixed so that it worked properly. But Champion had made the farmer some kind of a special price; also, they had notified every purchaser of a McCormick binder in the neighborhood to come and see this binder fail, with a view of getting them to cancel their orders.
“A big crowd of machine men had come to the hotel that night and the Deering fellows said they would come in too and show us both up.
“I got up at three o’clock in the morning and drove out to the farm and woke the farmer up. He put on his pants and came out to the barn where I gave him such a sales talk that he was absolutely convinced the McCormick was the best machine.
“In the morning there were at least 150 farmers there. The Deering outfit was the first to start. They had a new machine all decorated with flags and four big gray horses. But when the first bundle of tangled barley came through it choked and they were done.
“The farmer, driving our binder, was having no trouble, but I caught a Champion man trying to put a handful of straw in our elevator chains to foul them. I grabbed him by the neck and he fell down in the stubble. Then the whole Champion crew started after me, but somebody got between us. They started to abuse the farmer, a big powerful man, and he struck the Champion dealer. The farmer’s old father stopped the fight, but the whole competition broke up into a row. Finally, Champion left in disgrace without having driven us from the field.”
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Old 07-09-2018, 04:11:28 PM
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Default Re: Vintage Tractor Fun Facts

John Deere with their ROLL O MATIC system on later John Deere row crop tractors.Did anybody else come out with another version of this system?
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Old 07-09-2018, 05:09:30 PM
ronm ronm is offline
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Default Re: Vintage Tractor Fun Facts

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Originally Posted by casertractor View Post
John Deere with their ROLL O MATIC system on later John Deere row crop tractors.Did anybody else come out with another version of this system?
Probably not...because it sucked. Here, on irrigated ground, the Roll-O-Matic was universally hated. It would not follow a crease-(furrow), one tire or the other would jump in the crease & throw the tractor off line. The single front wheel worked worlds better.
I have a Roll-O-Matic I bought at an auction for 10 bucks because nobody else would bid on it...I had just bought a single front that was beside it, & the auctioneer finally looked at me & said 10? So I bit, & I've had the damn thing for 15 years...nobody wants them around here.
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Old 07-09-2018, 07:20:41 PM
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Default Re: Vintage Tractor Fun Facts

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Originally Posted by FWurth View Post
A few more firsts from Harvester: First row crop tractor with over 100 HP, first successful production cotton picker, First air delivery planter, First Axial Flow combine/ single rotor. I can't recall if New Holland got their Twin Rotor on the market first but I know they were trying to develop theirs at that same time. Also can't forget the first successful tricycle row crop tractor.
New holland had the twin rotor in 1975 and IH came out with the axial flow in 1979. In the top ten of most important ag advances IMO. Also an interesting fact is the rollomatic was invented by a man from near Marshall MN. He first tried selling it to IH but they turned him down.
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Old 07-09-2018, 07:55:21 PM
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Default Re: Vintage Tractor Fun Facts

Never had much experience with the Rollamatic. Was its purpose to keep the steering wheel from whipping out of your hands when hitting a dead furrow?
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Old 07-09-2018, 11:09:06 PM
ronm ronm is offline
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Default Re: Vintage Tractor Fun Facts

The idea was when a wheel hit a rock or some obstruction the other one would oscillate down & compensate for the bump. Not a bad idea at all, it just wasn't the thing for furrow-irrigated ground.
And wouldn't you know, there's a youtube video...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=99tyVdE9ADA
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Last edited by ronm; 07-09-2018 at 11:36:35 PM.
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Old 07-10-2018, 07:07:30 AM
AndyMoravec AndyMoravec is offline
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Default Re: Vintage Tractor Fun Facts

Anyone have any facts on Oliver, Minneapolis, or case?

Case was the number one producer of steam engines.
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Old 07-10-2018, 06:50:49 PM
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Default Re: Vintage Tractor Fun Facts

I believe the Moline universal tractor should be the first with electric starter and lights in 1919.
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Old 07-10-2018, 07:00:11 PM
casertractor casertractor is offline
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Default Re: Vintage Tractor Fun Facts

Anybody know who was the first company to style their tractors?
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