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Antique Steel Wheel Tractors - Old Iron Lugs and Cleats Photos and information about antique steel wheeled farm tractors. This is where to find the heaviest of Old Iron tractors.

Antique Steel Wheel Tractors - Old Iron Lugs and Cleats

Fordson ID


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  #11  
Old 04-04-2011, 12:44:52 PM
Robert Holt Robert Holt is offline
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Default Re: Fordson ID

Hi Keith, Edd, good reply but don't forget the square back edge to the radiator top also the 1/2 shafts are held in place by "c" clips so when the spline becomes worn you could swap them round. on the very early ones the timer support hole was different their are other differences but we would be on all night, Keith see you soon .....R
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  #12  
Old 04-04-2011, 02:28:59 PM
DesertExplorer DesertExplorer is offline
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Default Re: Fordson ID

There were quite a lot of changes between the 1917 MOM (Minister of Munitions) tractors and the 1918 production models (the 17 MOM's more resembled the late 16 and early 17 demonstrator models with the early 1916 experimentals being completely different!). Even the early 1918 had a lot of changes compared to the late 1918. The earliest 18's were similar to the MOM's of 1917 but all had Fordson embossed on the front of the radiators. None of the MOM's had Fordson on the front radiators. Also the early radiators had holes cast under the right side of radiator. These holes were made for an early Bosch style ignition (pre timer) that also attached to the front cover which had 2 mounting ears where the timer eventually was located. The early radiator also had squared corners as was earlier mentioned and a couple different style ladder sides which appeared into early 19.
Also, I've never seen any early 18 models with the oil filler on the middle/side of the block. I was told by long time fordson collector that these blocks were only on the early demonstrator models and the MOM's. The oil filler was moved to the front of the block for the 18 models to the end of production. These early side fillers and some early 18 production engines were made by Hercules.
The wheels were also different on these earlier models. The rear were of lighter construction and had a "scallop" style cast hub holding the spokes. These were used on the late 17 through to about April or May of 18 then the hub did away with the scallop and had a real rough casting that lasted through middle of the year and then changed to a heavier hub but was still of the 6 spoke style through to 1919. Also the 17 and early 18 rear wheels had 16 lugs instead of the more common 14 and the wheel diameters were also different. Some other differences between the 17 MOM, early and late 18 models were the coil box, fire wall, oil pan, front axle, tool box, hub cap and cast gas starting tank, etc... Just the front wheel hub cap alone saw 5 different changes in the 17/18 models. Suffice to say like the Model T there were a lot of changes through the years.. especially in the very early years.
From what I read in a Ford pub. years ago, all the 1917 production tractors went to England through the Minister of Munitions and the 18 production models were available stateside and worldwide.
Wally

Last edited by DesertExplorer; 04-04-2011 at 11:44:24 PM.
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  #13  
Old 04-05-2011, 01:12:48 AM
Butch Howe Butch Howe is offline
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Default Re: Fordson ID

Nice to see an early Fordson thread. It is very hard to find a complete and correct early Fordson. As some of you know, I have had a number of 1918-19 tractors over the years. The 1918 that I took to the national meet last year at Penns Cave is probably the most original and correct that I have seen. It even has the original "side seam" feul tank in excellent condition.
It is refreshing to see the knowledge coming out here concerning them. There were indeed a lot of changes all through production.
Steve Welker told me that he has identified 6 variations of early oil pans alone.
The early casting dates are very interesting. Sometimes they appear in unusual places, shapes and sizes. Keith ( Hi Keith)has a 1919 has a date on the foot rest. The block is dated in a circle on the side of the block under the coil box. Very unusual. Sometimes dates can be found in huge numbers as on the bottom side of my radiator tank.
These parts were dated as they were cast, I believe in an early attempt to track production. They went into bins along the production line and were used as needed. If a dash, for instance, were at the bottom of the bin it may be a while before it was put on a tractor. Therefore dates were sometimes spread over weeks or even months. My 1918 has many casting dates on it and they are all within a week of eachother. Dating gradually went away and by 1922 was all but gone.
I am asked ocassionally to date a Fordson and usually can get it fairly close identifying parts which were used in various years. Sometimes it is just impossible. I have a very nice tractor which was made up from parts years ago. It has an Irish engine, English radiator, early F dash, Kingston regenerator manifold, F rear axle housings, and so-on. It's such a nice running tractor but I I don't know what year to call it.

Most of the MOMs went to the UK but a few stayed behind. There are a handful here in the US and Canada. I've never owned one but I did pass on one a few years ago in New hampshire.

If anyone needs any help or just to say Hi email or PM me. I am getting a little deaf so I don't use the phone as much as I'd like. Ed, I'll see you at Hudson. Hi bruce!!
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Old 04-05-2011, 02:24:31 PM
Robert Holt Robert Holt is offline
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Default Re: Fordson ID

Hi Edd, Bruce,Keith and all the other fordson "F" fans wouldn't it be great for all of us to sit down over a beer or coffee with a blank piece of paper and pool our thoughts on what parts should be fitted to an early fordson MOM, i think it would make a good video ....R
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Old 04-05-2011, 03:58:23 PM
Keith Bryan Keith Bryan is offline
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Default Re: Fordson ID

Hi all fellow fordson enthusiasts,
I agree with Robert, (Hi Robert: looking forward meeting you soon.) it would be great if a few fans of the very early fordsons could get together and document the early features. There is so much knowledge out there and it would great to pool it all together. In the mean time, maybe a thread dedicated to listing the early features (with photos) or a wiki style web page might be an easy way of letting people add their knowledge and gathering this MOM/fordson anatomy information together.
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Old 04-05-2011, 04:08:50 PM
Ed Bezanson Ed Bezanson is offline
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Default Re: Fordson ID

In the 1980's Jack Heald wrote a 3 or 4 part series in Gas Engine magazine which was one of the best articles on the subject I have ever seen. I have been trying to get Farm Collector to reprint it again since there is so much more interest in the subject today. Keiths idea is a good one because at the Stak we have people from around the world who can shed some light on the subject. Although I am a Fordson nut I have never been that interested in the exact detail of each model but this thread shows that not everyone feels like me. Maybe if someone gets the ball rolling it will turn into a good resourse for the future since it seems like more and more people are showing interest in the Fordson. Ed B
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Old 04-05-2011, 10:44:57 PM
Matt Montague Matt Montague is offline
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Default Re: Fordson ID

Ed,
As I now look squarely into the eyes of a half a century, I take note of your post.
I now remember why I started collecting Fordson so many years ago when I was just a pudgy middle school kid.
They were cheap and easy to Get. I have over the years become more interested in other makes.
However that being said I do have the #1 Fordson that I bought when I was only 14. I would never consider selling her, she is reliable. Which is as you know somewhat hard to find these days. The Fordsons are getting harder to come by out here on the left coast, time and wet weather have taken their toll.
Henry had a good product for the day, one that helped this county grow to the agricultural giant that it is today. I only wish that he would have put a governor on his Tractor.
Thanks.
Matt
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  #18  
Old 04-06-2011, 02:53:35 AM
Robert Holt Robert Holt is offline
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Default Re: Fordson ID

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed Bezanson View Post
In the 1980's Jack Heald wrote a 3 or 4 part series in Gas Engine magazine which was one of the best articles on the subject I have ever seen. I have been trying to get Farm Collector to reprint it again since there is so much more interest in the subject today. Keiths idea is a good one because at the Stak we have people from around the world who can shed some light on the subject. Although I am a Fordson nut I have never been that interested in the exact detail of each model but this thread shows that not everyone feels like me. Maybe if someone gets the ball rolling it will turn into a good resourse for the future since it seems like more and more people are showing interest in the Fordson. Ed B
Hi all, Edd,Keith .... a page on the stack with pic's good thinking .....so David (parfitt) ....its now up to you .
Edd if this works could it be included in one of your books as it would be good reading and reference for generations to come .....R
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Old 04-06-2011, 03:03:53 AM
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David Parfitt David Parfitt is offline
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Default Re: Fordson ID

A dedicated thread on the Stak would probably be the best place to discuss the various Fordson features, but once the info is gathered together I can always add it to the Fordson page on my website if you like?

All the best

David
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Old 04-06-2011, 09:30:47 AM
Ed Bezanson Ed Bezanson is offline
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Default Re: Fordson ID

Matt, Robert, David : I have a 1926 Fordson that is the most complete original tractor I have ever found. It even has some paint on it but the best part is that nothing has ever been changed from new. All the tools are in the tool box and it has great original fenders in tact. Fenders are for me the hardest thing to find since here in the New England winters everything rusted away years ago. Anyone need 5 paits of fender brackets?It also had an interseting belt roller mounted on the front axle[an aftermarket option] As Robert suggested I could very well include research in Vol 3 of my Fordson series which I havn't even started writing yet including pictures. I do have Jacks entire set of photos he collected during 30 years of running the Fordson club. I know there are many showing the very things we have been talking about here but I have just not had enough time to give them a good look. David since the STAK is the only web site I have ever been on I have not seen your Fordson section but will give it a look soon. Remember Guys The Fordson Tractor was the most important tractor ever built on Earth. That should get some interesting reactions. Ed B
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