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Friendliest/Practical/Best Traction Engine Cab/Footplate design


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  #21  
Old 09-10-2014, 08:32:10 AM
Steve Harris Steve Harris is offline
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Default Re: Friendliest/Practical/Best Traction Engine Cab/Footplate design

17HP General Purpose Sawyer-Massey.
Large flat platform for two operators and all controls at easy reach.
Small machine that offers great visibility and maneuverability while providing huge power.
Easy to fire from platform and the ground. Makes steam from the match stick.
Very easy to manage water. Glass can be full to the top nut and it will not pull water under moderate load like threshing.
Rear stub axles are sprung and float for a comfortable ride. Admittedly not the best plowing engine but hard to beat in the belt.

Most of the above can be said about Waterloo, and Goodison too

Last edited by Steve Harris; 09-10-2014 at 11:56:31 PM. Reason: fat fingers
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  #22  
Old 09-10-2014, 05:00:50 PM
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Roger Byrne Roger Byrne is offline
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Default Re: Friendliest/Practical/Best Traction Engine Cab/Footplate design

Minneapolis, Advance, Russell and Port Huron . . . for that matter, most any side-mount engine is better than a rear-mount.
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Old 09-10-2014, 09:30:43 PM
Daniel L. Carruthers Daniel L. Carruthers is offline
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Default Re: Friendliest/Practical/Best Traction Engine Cab/Footplate design

How about a Kitten? Michelle, this comment is for you!
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  #24  
Old 09-11-2014, 03:54:46 AM
GreasyIron GreasyIron is offline
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Default Re: Friendliest/Practical/Best Traction Engine Cab/Footplate design

Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger Byrne View Post
Minneapolis, Advance, Russell and Port Huron . . . for that matter, most any side-mount engine is better than a rear-mount.
I'm quite happy with the quirks of whichever engine I'm standing on, so hadn't followed this thread too close, but it is interesting.

Minneapolis seems to be roomy enough, yet not too far from the ground. Sure like the firebox door too, both for firing and maintenance. I find the ergonomic looking throttle lever more awkward than a straight lever, but not bad.

Not much time on Russells or Ports, but they do seem comfortable.

If ours had saddle tanks and fuel bunkers on the platform (I believe that was an option even on their side mounts), I'd throw Keck in the mix. Should be great for belt work, but standing on logs on any engine when driving around is a bit cumbersome.

Undermount Avery was noted earlier, that is a great operator arrangement and neat steering - but in a show environment you almost need to have a left spotter [can double as fireman though] or do some acrobatics to know you're not going to run over somebody!
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Old 09-11-2014, 07:09:45 AM
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Default Re: Friendliest/Practical/Best Traction Engine Cab/Footplate design

This is a very interesting thread for someone like myself trying to learn about many different types of engines. I was wondering if any engines seem to be better suited for shorter operators seems to me like the ones with tanks out front might be hard for a short person to see around.
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Old 09-11-2014, 08:44:51 AM
T James Ives T James Ives is offline
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Default Re: Friendliest/Practical/Best Traction Engine Cab/Footplate design

And the worst?? Almost any English engine bar the very largest.
The horn plates come back off the sides of the boiler, so any crew space is only as wide as the boiler. Then the coal bunker is across the back, so all access is from the side. Fire holes are level with the footstand so are buried deep down. A steersman usually has a foot outside on a small step.
This is my 1/2 scale but it gives an idea of how cramped things are.
But we manage, better cramped up than not at all!
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  #27  
Old 09-11-2014, 11:10:56 AM
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20 Reeves Highwheeler 20 Reeves Highwheeler is offline
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Default Re: Friendliest/Practical/Best Traction Engine Cab/Footplate design

I wasn't going to participate here, risking getting rocks thrown at me, but T James reported on the British engine deck.

A few of the big US plowing engines have pluses and minuses. They are definitely "two man" engines. Fireman and engineer or steersman.

The Big Forty Gaar Scott appears from the outside to have a roomy fireman's platform. It isn't due to two guys with Italian ties yucking it up in the first picture, but if you had a coal shovel full of coal, there isn't room to turn that shovel around, after grabbing it from under the water tank. And I apologize to Jerred for complaining, as I am so blessed to have gotten to operate that engine for an afternoon. Thank you again, Jerred. An impossible memory to forget.

Then the 40 hp Reeves and 110 hp Case. Jason H, if you were looking for an engine with a spectacular view, the Reeves takes the cake. Now you may need some extra steps added in order to get up there. However, the guy down below firing, he has a respectable operating area. It feels enclosed. And as Roger Byrne reiterated earlier, any rear mounted engine gets harder to fire due to the cannon bearing arrangements. However, the Canadian Reeves with the automatic firebox door operator, and firing with coal isn't bad. Thank you Jim Bodenham for the experience on that Reeves!

The 110 hp Case is another two man engine and if the operator can stay put, it all works out well. The fireman's platform is roomy. Again, a rear mounted engine. I've gotten to fire one with coal once. The rest of my tenure was with wood, and that isn't as fun.

The last photo is of Mike and Randy's 20 hp Reeves. Other than being another rear mounted engine and not having any coal to fire with, that platform is very roomy and one guy can run it well. Visibility is limited forward, due to double cylinder engine and flywheel to rear.

All of the above engines are memorable events in my life. I've had side mounted Nichols & Shepard and Russell engines. They're not bad either. Gary
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  #28  
Old 09-11-2014, 11:51:10 AM
Tom Runty Tom Runty is offline
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Default Re: Friendliest/Practical/Best Traction Engine Cab/Footplate design

Some of this depends on the situation. For example, my 19 Port Huron is definitely the easiest thing I have ever manipulated when I run it alone (which is most of the time). The sight lines are excellent, it is easy to handle and I can fire from the ground, but I'm 6'4". It may not be as easy for someone shorter. On the other hand, at Sycamore we are required to have two people on the engine for the parade. If my wife wants to ride along, and the helper brings someone along, and then someone else wants to ride, pretty soon it feels like a clown car, and I have to stand right up on the boiler (in August) to accommodate. So I give it excellent marks for an individual, but it is not roomy.

Case platforms are roomy for multiple riders, but my hauschlagers knees make it a tough fire. I was surprised by the ease of handling of a 25-85 Nichols & Shepard, but again, I wouldn't call it roomy (wide enough, but not deep). Smaller Nick's (20-70 and down) are easier yet, but I don't care much for the rear-mounts. Don't like those cranks spinning in my face.

Advance Rumely 20's are better in this regard, but it helps to be tall, even with the boards on the platform sides. I can fire a Universal from the ground, but not as easily as some.

I find Minneapolis engines interesting from an optical standpoint. I think you stand lower on the platform than most, and because of that it seems that the boiler goes on forever in front of you. With the head tank besides, they are a bit more difficult for a single person, but roomy enough for two. The 25-85 Nick was similar, but not quite as pronounced.

The Avery Undermounts I have driven are virtually impossible to see both sides, and little in the way of accommodation to move from one side to another. IMO, you see well on the side you are on, but that is as far as it goes. And they are so long as to be cumbersome at best in a crowd, provided you keep the worm steering clean. If that gets stiff, all bets are off!

That's the extent of my experience.

TDR
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Old 09-11-2014, 02:40:08 PM
Rob Bryce Rob Bryce is offline
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Default Re: Friendliest/Practical/Best Traction Engine Cab/Footplate design

For big engines, the 32hp Abell has a nice large deck for the fireman. Like the 110 or the 40 Reeves, the engineer gets to sit up high, out of the way of the fireman with a great view of the motor and of where you're going. Bonus, all the levers are kept to the right-hand side for easy access by the engineer. And the water glass is on the rear head for both the fireman and engineer to watch.

--Rob
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Old 09-11-2014, 06:37:59 PM
GreasyJohn GreasyJohn is offline
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Default Re: Friendliest/Practical/Best Traction Engine Cab/Footplate design

While I mostly agree with the above statements about British engines I believe there is one exception to the rule in the 3 ton Wallis and Steevens tractors. I spent some time operating Golliath and it was a joy
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