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Restoration of 1918 Stewart Truck


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  #1  
Old 03-25-2013, 09:52:37 PM
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Troy Vetsch Troy Vetsch is offline
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Photo Restoration of 1918 Stewart Truck

Many of the stakkers who read this may see my thanks and a few comments on smokstak here. I have done a little bit of work the past few summers by going and obtaining my Minnesota steam license, along with getting a couple of tractors running for my grandpa. This fall I asked Roger Byrne (fellow stakker) if I could restore the Stewart Truck back in his shed and after some talking and moving things around. I was told I could restore it and he would help me along the way with it. We got it dug out of the shed and pulled it up to the garage. The engine, transmission, hood, and radiator were removed. The truck then got put back into the shed, and will be brought back back out in the spring.

There is some history to this truck also and some pictures....
The truck is a Model 8 one ton and at one time had dual wheels on it.

Pre - 1931 Monroe Bahnoon owned the truck of Inwood, Iowa and was used as a fuel truck. The it was sold to the Joe Clerex family and was owned from 1931 to 1995 in Jasper, Minnesota. Sometime around 1931 a corn sheller was mounted to the frame until 1939. After that it was just used as a truck on the farm.

There is more to come

Troy
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Old 03-26-2013, 11:39:17 AM
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20 Reeves Highwheeler 20 Reeves Highwheeler is offline
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Default Re: Restoration of 1918 Stewart Truck

Troy,
As you know, I've been following this restoration from the moment you and our friend Roger pulled it out of the shed. I'm really excited to see the finished product, as I've seen many of the "goodie-accesories" that will be bolted on eventually. I believe you plan to make a "C-cab" for it, which will be stunning. Keep up the good work, my friend!
Gary
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Old 03-26-2013, 12:08:56 PM
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Default Re: Restoration of 1918 Stewart Truck

Looking forward to future updates on it.

Our club used to have a larger Stewart Truck that they were looking for someone to restore 20 some odd years ago. I don't remember anymore now if a club member took on the restoration (and then never finished it) or if it ended up being sold.

I remember it having a heavy cast aluminum firewall, and 'Patented' Wood Inserts in the frame rails..... but beyond that, it's been many many years since I've seen it.
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Old 03-27-2013, 05:13:58 PM
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Default Re: Restoration of 1918 Stewart Truck

Here is the Stewart Truck in Rogers driveway after removal of the engine and radiator last fall. The engine is a 4 cylinder red seal Continental engine. We tore the engine down and turned it into a parts pile.

These plates were mounted to the side of the engine

Troy
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Old 03-28-2013, 02:18:59 AM
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Default Re: Restoration of 1918 Stewart Truck

Per the plate that's a Cont'l "N", which per a 30 McCord gasket catalog was solid head and apparently issued in both 31/2x5 and 33/4x5 sizes...
The place to start for obsolete Cont'l parts (or advice or sympathy, depending on circumstances) is Garrad (Jerry/Gerry) Moon at Monte's Eqpmt in Chicago, obsolete Cont'l parts dealers..
garradmoon@montes@flash.net or montesequipment.com
P A Ross Machinery in Dallas has also been mentioned as helpful with old Cont'ls--parossmachinery.com. Good luck.
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Old 03-28-2013, 01:24:47 PM
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Smile Re: Restoration of 1918 Stewart Truck

After we got the engine out of truck. We made a parts pile of it and got started. The first thing I started on was the a pair of headlights and side lamps for the truck when it is finished. Roger had the lights and I took them home. I took them apart, sandblasted and repainted them. New leather gaskets needed to be made along with cleaning the years and years of dirty residue off the lenses. I was very careful while handling the lenses not break them. The lights are painted black.

Troy
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Old 04-12-2013, 11:40:31 PM
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Post Re: Restoration of 1918 Stewart Truck

I started working on the name plates for the Stewart Truck. I got them cleaned as best I could and we scanned them into a computer. Hoping to clean them up a bit and reprint them to make the plates new again.

The three Stewart plates came off of the truck

"Never use cheap oil" plate came off of the engine
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Old 04-25-2013, 03:13:07 PM
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Post Re: Restoration of 1918 Stewart Truck

Roger and I removed the pistons from the block. We could turn the crankshaft and play with it, and the pistons would squeeze out of the block. It was a very tight squeeze. I also had to make sure not to push the pistons all the way up to the top, as the rings would catch. We got the oil pan off and the pistons out in good shape. The oil pan was filled with a black paste/tar. Roger believes there was carbon in the oil which led it to break down the oil so poorly. The pistons will need some machining for the over sized rings we will be getting. To finish it off I headed over to Allen Severson's and used his pressure washer to clean the oil pan, block, and the crankcase.
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Old 04-25-2013, 03:38:53 PM
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Default Re: Restoration of 1918 Stewart Truck

"The oil pan was filled with a black paste/tar." Just think what it would have been if Cheap oil had been used. I'm sure the engine will benefit from a modern detergent oil after the overhaul.
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Old 04-25-2013, 09:14:36 PM
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Default Re: Restoration of 1918 Stewart Truck

I have a Model T and have been told to use non detergent oil if you don't have a filter. Any thoughts? Thanks
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Old 05-06-2013, 01:19:51 PM
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Post Re: Restoration of 1918 Stewart Truck

My Stewart truck will be using modern detergent oil, because it will have been overhauled. If it hasn't been overhauled and you use non detergent oil, I would say keep using that kind. You could switch over to the modern oil, but expect frequent oil changes since it will loosen some of the heavier oil inside the engine.

Troy
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Old 05-06-2013, 04:01:09 PM
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Default Re: Restoration of 1918 Stewart Truck

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff LaCrone View Post
I have a Model T and have been told to use non detergent oil if you don't have a filter. Any thoughts? Thanks
If the engine is a fresh rebuilt, then use detergent. If it has been run non detergent for a long time than stay with non detergent. You don't want the detergent to wash all that crud off and circulate through the engine.
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Old 08-20-2013, 11:07:17 PM
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Default Re: Restoration of 1918 Stewart Truck

Here we are measuring the crankshaft bearing surfaces to figure out how much out of round the crankshaft is. We used a digital caliper and a micrometer for precision measurement. I measured four different places on each bearing surface. Then afterwards we used a Timesaver Compound to grind the crankshaft into the bearings. That way we have a good, smooth surface for the crankshaft to ride in.
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Old 08-21-2013, 01:56:00 PM
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Exclamation Re: Restoration of 1918 Stewart Truck

You should have the block boiled and chemically cleaned, if you plan to use detergent oil. Detergent oil will clean EVERY hidden surface, putting the gum and gunk into suspension in the oil. As the engine has no filter, this material will find its way into cam bearings and all babbitted bearings as well. With non detergent oil, gum and dirt in the system will not be loosenned, and any dirt in the oil will settle in the bottom of the crankcase, as you have found.

I would recommend a 500 mile break in with non-detergent oil, then a removal of the engine pan for inspection. If no debris (carbon, metal chips, sludge) are found, then from then on, use detergent oil, with frequent oil changed (every 2000 miles). In al reality, with no filter, frequent oil changes should be regimin - in this case, there is no real advantage in detergent oil, due to the required frequent oil changes.
Andrew
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Old 09-09-2013, 11:57:26 PM
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Lightbulb Re: Restoration of 1918 Stewart Truck

After we got done working on the block, the next step is the transmission. First we headed over to Allen Severson's shop and I power washed the transmission after we wrapped the clutch in plastic. We then tore the transmission apart back at Rogers' shop and found parts of a bearing in the bottom. So we found out we needed to make a thrust bearing for the clutch/transmission.
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Old 09-20-2013, 08:30:04 AM
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Default Re: Restoration of 1918 Stewart Truck

I enjoy reading about the work that you and Roger are doing on the Stewart. I bought a 1920 IHC truck and found first gear broken in 4 pieces in the bottom of the transmission. Sometimes a mechanical break down on these old trucks causes them to be put aside for repairs before they are worn out and inadvertently preserved. Jim
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Old 09-20-2013, 09:16:00 AM
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Default Re: Restoration of 1918 Stewart Truck

The oil question is often discussed with different views. The principles involved should be clear; In an engine without an oil filter non detergent oil is intended to let the "crud" that you found in the pan to settle & remain undisturbed until you remove the pan & clean it out, usually at the next ring & valve job. In an engine with an oil filter, detergent oil is intended to keep the impurities in suspension to be continuously removed by the filter.

Two conclusions can be made;
1. Detergent oil without a filter constantly circulates the abrasive impurities through your bearings.
2. Detergent oil introduced into an old engine that has been used with non detergent oil will loosen up great quantities of "crud" & possibly clog oil passages with undesirable results.

A clean rebuilt engine can usually handle detergent oil & with very frequent oil changes may be safe but the non detergent oil would be safer with longer change intervals.

My father who owned a new & used car dealership & was a licensed mechanic starting in the 1930s, saw the inception of detergent motor oil & repaired a great many ruined engines from its use. He was always very adamant about never putting detergent in an old or unknown engine.
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Old 09-20-2013, 06:18:45 PM
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Default Re: Restoration of 1918 Stewart Truck

You make some good points Jack. My guess is this topic will have pros and cons depending on who you talk too. Air cooled VWs didn't have oil filters, but the factory recommended detergent oil. The thinking is, if you start with a clean engine and change the oil every 3,000 miles there isn't going to be much crud suspended in the oil, and what crud there is will be flushed out at oil change. Now let me muddy the water some more. Are there any non detergent synthetic oils for gas engines? If there is, I bet you can't go down to wally world and buy some.
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Old 09-20-2013, 06:30:07 PM
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Default Re: Restoration of 1918 Stewart Truck

If an engine is bad enough that cleaning it up with detergent oil turns it into an oil burner it was shot anyway.
This is going to be a "new" engine.
I much prefer to drain oil with all the crap coming out with it than having it accumulate in the bottom of the pan.
There is no reason for Troy to not use detergent oil.
I can't remember the last time I bought non-detergent oil.......
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Old 09-20-2013, 07:43:50 PM
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Default Re: Restoration of 1918 Stewart Truck

I've been using Mobil Delvac 15w40 in the 6 cylinder flathead engine that's in my '56 White WC22PLT. I don't know what was orginally used. I do know that it had a hydraulic lifter that was tapping and now that I've driven the truck and changed the oil several times it has quieted down. I pulled the oil pan to clean out the sludge and there wasn't any there. The engine does have a sock type oil filter.
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