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Delco and other Low Voltage DC Light Plants Antique Generators, Light Plants, Typically 24, 32 or 48 volt although some are 110 volt. DC Lamps, Motors and appliances.

Delco and other Low Voltage DC Light Plants

Delco Radio


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  #11  
Old 04-24-2016, 12:55:08 PM
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Brian.P Brian.P is offline
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Default Re: Delco Radio

thanks everyone for the input

I forgot I bought a Ruston Hornsby just over a year ago never went and got it
it's just a couple of miles away and the guys hobby is old tube radio's and other things

when I do go get the engine will show him the radio

I will pull the insides out and take a picture there may be missing parts
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  #12  
Old 04-25-2016, 05:40:35 PM
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Elden DuRand Elden DuRand is offline
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Default Re: Delco Radio

I'm intrigued by the 32 volt plate voltage used in that radio. I've heard of using low plate voltage with miniature tubes to get hyper gain but never in an octal tube set.

Could anybody supply a schematic of the radio so I can see how they do that. If not, just list the tube compliment and I'll see if I can find something close.

I can't imagine the set having a power output of over a watt if that due to the plates only swinging a part of 32 volts. After stpdown to the speaker voice coil, the voltage would be pretty small.
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  #13  
Old 04-25-2016, 07:19:30 PM
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Default Re: Delco Radio

Elden

I posted a link to the schematic in post 4

But here it is again http://www.nostalgiaair.org/Resources/381/M0022381.htm

There are lots of links out there to tubes operating at low voltage, Delco must have had a lot of these radios about with the 32 Volt system. Battery sets using 90 Volt were common but the batteries were very expensive.

Mike
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  #14  
Old 04-26-2016, 09:19:42 AM
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Default Re: Delco Radio

Mike:

Thanks for reminding me of the link. I took a look and find that the 32 volt plate supply radios are new to me.

Back in my "tube" days (1950's-'60's), my experience was with AC-DC and AC only line powered radios and TV's. I still have to get used to the idea of being able to develop any meaningful plate current at that low voltage with the internal resistance of vacuum tubes but I guess it worked.

I'll have to find one of my tube manuals and look up the characteristics of the tubes used in those sets.

I spent an interesting couple of hours this morning going through some of my old schematic books. Some of those resistor cord AC-DC radios of the '30's were scary!

I've also been bit more than a few times by "hot chassis" radios and learned to use a neon tester between the chassis and ground to make sure they were plugged-in the right way before poking around in them.
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Old 04-26-2016, 10:45:04 AM
Radiomike Radiomike is offline
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Default Re: Delco Radio

Elden

Low plate voltage for tubs radios was not common, but seemed to work well enough.

This is a link to a site describing a 12 Volt tube radio, so it is possible.
http://www.oldradiobuilder.com/12vsuperhet.html

When working on the AC/DC sets and those with no galvanic isolation from the mains I use a ground free isolation transformer. This has taps as well so I can reduce the voltage to 110 from the 120 we get. Live chassis sets can be hazardous to users as well as repair chaps. The resistor cord type were suspect as well, often called "curtain burners"

Mike
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Old 04-30-2017, 11:52:14 AM
Dennis Craft Dennis Craft is offline
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Default Re: Delco Radio

Brain, did you get your Delco radio running?

Dennis

---------- Post added at 08:52:14 AM ---------- Previous post was at 08:48:41 AM ----------

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dennis Craft View Post
Brain, did you get your Delco radio running?

Dennis
Oops again, sorry Brian for misspelling your name. But no doubt, you have a good brain.

Dennis
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  #17  
Old 06-01-2017, 05:11:21 PM
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Default Re: Delco Radio

Dennis

never did any thing with it yet . it's sitting on a deck in the living room
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Old 06-01-2017, 06:41:57 PM
George Andreasen George Andreasen is offline
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Default Re: Delco Radio

If I can make one suggestion.....

If you go through the radio and get it up and running, consider putting an "oddball" plug on the cord. Something like a 20 amp plug with one blade turned sideways so that it can't be plugged into 120 volts easily. Get a matching receptacle and decide which blade will be positive, then wire them accordingly.

A tag on the cord right behind the plug that says "Warning...32 volt DC. Do NOT plug into 120 volt AC".....might be a good idea too. Or perhaps a paper tag on the radio's back with the same warning.

The idea is simple. If the radio ever leaves your hands in the future, it stands a better chance of surviving some klutz just plugging it in "to see if it still works".
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Old 06-01-2017, 08:43:23 PM
Dennis Craft Dennis Craft is offline
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Default Re: Delco Radio

Hi,

I see that you are in Canada. I am willing to walk you through any restoration that is needed. It would be easier and faster over the phone, however. Does it cost much to call the states from Canada?

FYI, I have this set and others. My hobby and passion is the antique radios, my side interest is the gensets. If it didn't cost you much, I would suggest to send it to me and I can check it out, then send it back. Do you know anyone that comes to Arizona in the winter? We have a lot of winter visitors from Canada here.

Dennis
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