Oil Field Engines
[Home] - [HELP] - [Forums] - [Groups] - [Classified Ads] - [Subscribe] - [Books] - [Sponsors] -

Go Back   SmokStak > SmokStak® Antique Engine Community > Oil Field Engines & Related Equipment
Forgot Password? Join Us!

Notices

Oil Field Engines & Related Equipment OFES members otherwise known as "Oafs". If you like "BIG OLD GREASY RUSTY OIL FIELD ENGINES, you're in the right place. Founded by Russell Farmer.

Oil Field Engines & Related Equipment

Who's currently working on an Oilfield Engine?


this thread has 31 replies and has been viewed 2335 times

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 03-03-2019, 09:06:08 AM
Peter Holmander Peter Holmander is offline
Subscriber
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: West Greenwich, Rhode Island
Posts: 654
Thanks: 1,112
Thanked 607 Times in 259 Posts
Default Who's currently working on an Oilfield Engine?

Kinda quiet on the O.F.E.S. board lately. Anyone working on a winter oilfield engine project they could share?
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 03-03-2019, 02:57:46 PM
Rob Charles Rob Charles is offline
Card Sponsor
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 1,366
Thanks: 1,050
Thanked 1,369 Times in 545 Posts
Default Re: Who's currently working on an Oilfield Engine??

I am working on a Sheffield 6 hp for another collector 7" bore 2 cycle crosshead style engine. Rob
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Rob Charles For This Post:
  #3  
Old 03-03-2019, 08:21:28 PM
Dirk Hochstetler Dirk Hochstetler is offline
Registered-III
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Nappanee, Indiana
Posts: 19
Thanks: 4
Thanked 8 Times in 5 Posts
Default Re: Who's currently working on an Oilfield Engine??

I m putting the cylinder on my 20hp Patton the getting rings made. Then pour cross head babitt. Wat fun they said lol ����
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Dirk Hochstetler For This Post:
  #4  
Old 03-04-2019, 08:17:15 AM
Peter Holmander Peter Holmander is offline
Subscriber
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: West Greenwich, Rhode Island
Posts: 654
Thanks: 1,112
Thanked 607 Times in 259 Posts
Default Re: Who's currently working on an Oilfield Engine??

I plan on finally finishing my 15 HP Reid in the spring. Still am undecided on what I am going to use for ignition. I have the hot tube setup or I have the magneto with the eccentric. No matter what I end up with, I still want to display each system to show what was offered by the factory. Might set it up to run off a carburetor too instead of propane. Decisions, decisions lol.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 03-05-2019, 08:09:36 AM
Joel Sanderson Joel Sanderson is offline
Registered-II
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Quincy, Michigan, USA
Posts: 269
Thanks: 106
Thanked 360 Times in 103 Posts
Default Re: Who's currently working on an Oilfield Engine??

Not on a Ried--but with a Reid. Does that count? Gotta clean the ports again soon. Seem to be getting a little too much blow by. And the last gas I got doesn't ignite as well, so I need to refigure the gasoline-to-kerosene ratio. (That might be making more blow by too.) I filled the tank on up the day before yesterday, and the wind's been stirring it; so maybe it'll run better now. Don't know til I try. I'm off work for a couple days now, so that should give it plenty of time to stir.

Since you were looking for conversation, maybe that counts. Winter'll be over soon, right? Then people in the north will want to live again. Sun does that. Or maybe it's birds. I've never figured out which.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Joel Sanderson For This Post:
  #6  
Old 03-05-2019, 08:26:34 AM
Peter Holmander Peter Holmander is offline
Subscriber
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: West Greenwich, Rhode Island
Posts: 654
Thanks: 1,112
Thanked 607 Times in 259 Posts
Default Re: Who's currently working on an Oilfield Engine??

Joel: Of course your post counts. Actually I've read quite a bit about your Reid on the Stak. You power your entire shop with it off a lineshaft correct? Nice hearing comments from Rob and Dirk too. I remember when this place was buzzing with activity. Lately it's been way to quiet. Hence, my post.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 03-05-2019, 08:42:04 AM
BMyrkle's Avatar
BMyrkle BMyrkle is offline
Subscriber
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Charlotte, Michigan, USA
Posts: 296
Thanks: 502
Thanked 485 Times in 149 Posts
Default Re: Who's currently working on an Oilfield Engine??

Before he died, my dad had a custom trailer fabricated for his 35 HP OC Bessemer engine, but he wasn't able to get all the coolant plumbing and air starting system finished before he got sick.

The coolant plumbing is quite straightforward, and I won't have any trouble getting that finished; but I would like to find someone with an oil field engine that is set up for air starting so that I could get a better idea of what I need to do.

I have a compressor engine mounted to the trailer and have an air pressure tank that should be ok. Just not sure about the valving and whatnot I'll need to make it work. I understand you need to get a volume of compressed air into the cylinder to give the piston a push, and then get the valve closed again for the compression stroke.

It's too nice of a set-up to let it sit unfinished, but I need some advice or an example to work from.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to BMyrkle For This Post:
  #8  
Old 03-05-2019, 09:26:11 AM
Joel Sanderson Joel Sanderson is offline
Registered-II
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Quincy, Michigan, USA
Posts: 269
Thanks: 106
Thanked 360 Times in 103 Posts
Default Re: Who's currently working on an Oilfield Engine??

Yes, Peter. I run my blacksmith and machine shop with a little 15 horse. I got it in 1999 (or was it 2000?) with some of the money I had left over from a biggish railing job. Two years ago the same family built an addition on their home and wanted more ironwork, which I'm finishing now. They came to my shop, and I was able to show them the engine their money bought for me the first time. It meant a lot to them to see it and for me to show it to them. I told them I've always felt like it was partly theirs.

Since you want more activity here, I'll start a separate thread on the fuel question I've been pondering--rather than hijack this one. Thanks for the suggestion and for waking us up a bit.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Joel Sanderson For This Post:
  #9  
Old 03-05-2019, 09:29:39 AM
Tremel Tremel is offline
Subscriber
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Claysville, Pennsylvania
Posts: 105
Thanks: 28
Thanked 45 Times in 22 Posts
Default Re: Who's currently working on an Oilfield Engine??

It's been a very long time since I've been active on these boards. Mostly because I have been running my kids to various activities, built a new house, took on some new job opportunities leaving the hobby to take a back seat. Well, my youngest son is now 16 and we made some major improvements to our shop last fall. (www.tremel.net).

With that, comes the opportunity to get back to work on my 16HP Acme Sucker Rod engine. I need to rebuild the entire head and valves for this engine as well as order new rings (anyone have any recommendations for 9" rings?)

Also, we picked up a 1949 International KB6 truck which we are restoring and planning to re-power and build a custom flatbed. My son said that the Acme engine would look nice on the back of that truck, and I couldn't agree more. So, work as resumed on both of these projects with no projected finish date.

I also have a 12 1/2 HP Bessemer that I would like to get up and running again. I need a connecting rod, cross-head sliders and cross-head knuckle. Anyone have 12 1/2HP Parts engine laying around?
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Tremel For This Post:
  #10  
Old 03-05-2019, 10:18:54 AM
Peter Holmander Peter Holmander is offline
Subscriber
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: West Greenwich, Rhode Island
Posts: 654
Thanks: 1,112
Thanked 607 Times in 259 Posts
Default Re: Who's currently working on an Oilfield Engine??

Your welcome Joel !! Look forward to seeing your post on the fuel system. Appreciate the compliment on waking up the OFES guys. I always knew they were out there. At one time, this section was one of the busiest.

---------- Post added at 09:09:36 AM ---------- Previous post was at 09:02:15 AM ----------

BMyrkle, I'm no expert, but someone out there more well versed on air starting than me will likely jump on here to help you. Its nice to see that you care enough about your Dad to finish the engine for him. From what I've seen and read, some engines come with air start system on them with automatic timing of the air to spin the engine. Other guys have designed their own systems as simple as a ball valve and some form of mark on the flywheel so you know the proper time to introduce the air to it. Obviously, putting the air to it at the wrong time can be catastrophic.

---------- Post added at 09:18:54 AM ---------- Previous post was at 09:09:36 AM ----------

Hey Mr. Tremel,,,nice to see you back on here. I've read many of your interesting posts here in the past. I know exactly what you mean about life getting in the way of this great hobby. That is exactly what happened to me. 15 years ago I found this website and being a guy that always was into mechanical stuff, I decided I just had to own an oilfield engine. I bought my 15HP Reid from a gentleman named William Wright in PA. You might know him. It was missing some parts like most of them are, and over the years I have acquired pretty much everything I need for it. Mounted it on a dedicated trailer for moving it around when I have time to work on it. It has almost become a joke now between myself and my son in law. He's always breaking my stones about not ever seeing it run again. Being retired now with lots of free time, I plan in proving him wrong.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Peter Holmander For This Post:
  #11  
Old 03-05-2019, 10:48:52 AM
Joel Sanderson Joel Sanderson is offline
Registered-II
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Quincy, Michigan, USA
Posts: 269
Thanks: 106
Thanked 360 Times in 103 Posts
Default Re: Who's currently working on an Oilfield Engine??

I've thought of making an air start for my Reid, but I think it's pretty risky with an engine that burns gasoline, because any left over fuel in the system might diesel when the compressed air's added. (It's like using oil to clean an air rifle--gives a pretty good crack on that first shot!) Maybe that's not a concern, but since my Reid runs all the time by dieseling, it does make me wonder. There're lots of guys here that should know though, and I'm not one of them.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 03-05-2019, 11:55:27 AM
Peter Holmander Peter Holmander is offline
Subscriber
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: West Greenwich, Rhode Island
Posts: 654
Thanks: 1,112
Thanked 607 Times in 259 Posts
Default Re: Who's currently working on an Oilfield Engine??

I agree Joel. Over the years I have studied most of the methods for assisting in starting of oilfield engines. I'm 70 yrs young now and cannot start the engine alone. And I don't want to have to rely on having extra help to do it. Lots of guys use friction starters, but the flywheels on Reid engines are just not beefy enough in my opinion to concentrate all that force on such a small area of the circumference of the flywheel. Many of the other engines out there have much stouter flywheels and I think friction starters are perfectly safe in those cases. I'm sure there are those out there who will disagree with me and say that its a safe method. And I'm ok with that. I just don't feel that it is. I purchased a 42 inch belt pulley and I am going to mount it on the Reid flywheel that has the drilled holes for the Sisterville clutches. Years ago I picked up a big mud sucker pump at an auction cheap and it has a 2 cylinder Wisconsin engine on it with a gear reduction on the business end of it. The pump was driven by a big chain, but I am going to remove the chain sprocket and install a 6 inch diameter belt pulley to that. The Wisconsin has a starter on it so no hand cranking for that engine. With the gear reduction and six inch pulley on the drive end and the 42 inch pulley on the flywheel, it should spin the engine over easily for starting purposes. And with little risk of destroying a flywheel. Once I get any bugs out of the design, I will mount it permanently to the trailer that the engine is mounted on.

---------- Post added at 10:55:27 AM ---------- Previous post was at 10:37:30 AM ----------

Joel, your comment about your engine making a good "crack" on the first shot brings back memories of when I bought my Reid. My son in law and I drove to Pa to pick it up. I told Mr. Wright that I was not going to take the engine unless I heard it run. It poured rain that day and they were trying to fire it off with a buzz coil. The heavy rain shorted out the coil we had so one of the guys there left to get a dry one. The 15 HP engine was mounted to oak timbers setting on the ground. A short time later the guy came back with a dry coil. They removed a pipe plug where the fuel supply goes into the engine and dumped a full dixie cup of gas in there. The dry coil was hooked up and 3 guys pulled on the flywheels and off she went. That Reid engine was running at full RPM,,jumping up and down on the ground like crazy. My son in laws eyes got as big as golf balls. He couldn't believe it. I'll never forget that unmistakable pow,pow,pow,pow sound that engine made that day. That sound is so addicting. Funny how when at an engine show and someone fires up a big engine, the whole crowd migrates to that engine. In my experience anyway. Just thought I'd share that with you.
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Peter Holmander For This Post:
  #13  
Old 03-05-2019, 01:35:39 PM
Joel Sanderson Joel Sanderson is offline
Registered-II
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Quincy, Michigan, USA
Posts: 269
Thanks: 106
Thanked 360 Times in 103 Posts
Default Re: Who's currently working on an Oilfield Engine??

That's really funny! I bet it was scary seeing that thing running like that.

I probably didn't write it clearly, but I meant to say that an air rifle will give a good crack on the first shot after cleaning with oil--not my engine. The air is compressed high enough to make the oil diesel. I'm not sure there'd be enough pressure in an air starter to do that or not, but I wouldn't want to find out. Apparently there's enough from compression, because my Reid does it.

I've probably told this on here before, but when I first put my Reid in, I had the bright idea of using a street light pole for an exhaust pipe, way up in the air over the shop. Well now, a light pole is tapered--small end up--so those exhaust gases had to accelerate on their way out the top. Let me tell you, when they hit that atmosphere, that was LOUD! It sounded like a whip crack, a sonic crack, along with the engine. Weird. A quarter mile way, almost to the neighbor's, it was so loud you wanted ear plugs! I'm sure it was heard in town, three miles away. It sure was impressive, but I didn't leave it that way for more than a day or two.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 03-06-2019, 09:33:05 AM
Peter Holmander Peter Holmander is offline
Subscriber
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: West Greenwich, Rhode Island
Posts: 654
Thanks: 1,112
Thanked 607 Times in 259 Posts
Default Re: Who's currently working on an Oilfield Engine??

I think it scared my son in law a little bit. I've seen several big engines do the same thing myself though.

A tapered exhaust visits the theory of convergent and divergent ducts. An exhaust pipe that is tapered or smaller at the exhaust end is divergent. The taper decreases velocity, but increases pressure. If you were to turn that aluminum light pole around and put the exhaust on the larger end, then it would be convergent, or the opposite. It would decrease pressure, but increase velocity. Just acting like a nerd sharing some of my jet engine theory from my training in the Navy. At my age, it's easy to confuse it and get it backwards, but I think I have it correct.

And I'm sure you now what a barker is. You created your own barker when you used that aluminum pole for an exhaust pipe.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Peter Holmander For This Post:
  #15  
Old 03-06-2019, 02:38:42 PM
Joel Sanderson Joel Sanderson is offline
Registered-II
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Quincy, Michigan, USA
Posts: 269
Thanks: 106
Thanked 360 Times in 103 Posts
Default Re: Who's currently working on an Oilfield Engine??

Wow. Oilfield engine guys are something.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 03-06-2019, 05:11:59 PM
Andrew Mackey Andrew Mackey is offline
Sponsor
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Rockaway, New Jersey USA
Posts: 14,100
Thanks: 1,993
Thanked 6,731 Times in 4,276 Posts
Exclamation Re: Who's currently working on an Oilfield Engine??

My engine club (The North jersey Antique Engine and Machine Club) tok a chance on my recomendation and bought a stuck Oil City/South Penn 20 HP engine - Sight Unseen. With a small pile of cash, i went to see Tom Schoolcraft, and bought and brought the engine back to New Jersey. What a trip! During the pick up run, I got my first look at the Coolspring Power Museum, and have been hooked since! It to nearly a year to get it all done, and now it is on proud permanant display at our engine club site. i wrote an article for GM about the resto as well.

As for air start - you need an air tank with about 10 times cylinder volume minimum. Around 125 to 150 PSI of air pressure for a gas engine, and 200-250 PSI for a diesel. That's a lot of pressure. You will need 11/2" steel pipe or larger for direct entry to the combustion chamber. You will need 2 spring loaded check valves mounted in series as close to the cylinser as possible, to keep a possible un-intended back pressure from getting back into the tank. You will need a 2" ball valve to allow air pressure to get to the cylinder as quickly as possible. You will also need a ball valve in the gas line too. When you do the air start piping, you will need to mount both the air and gas valves very close together.

Here goes nothing - first you need the compressor to charge the tank. If you are running on hot tube, you need to light it. MAKE sure the ball valves are closed DO NOT open the gas supply from tank yet. Turn engine until exhaust port is open and then partially open the air valve. Let run for several minutes. This is done to remove any gas that might be remaining in the cylinder to be vented. If the engine does not have a decompression valve, you can put a Tee into the air piping after the twin check valves - between the check assembly and the combustion chamber. Go with what ever supply pipe size and a 1/2" bull (side) connection and install a iron gas cock on the tee. Open that valve and turn the engine to JUST past TDC and close the gas cock. Now it's just a matter of timing. Open air ball valve and let the engine turn until it is just about bottom center, before the exhaust port opens. Close the air valve. The engine should have enough momentum to carry over the compression stroke, where you open the air valve again, right at TDC, and repeat the operation. keep doing this until you get used to operating the air valve at the proper time. Only do this for 3 compression strokes maximum each time you practice starting. You want the tank at peak pressure each start attempt. DO NOT skimp on air pressure! After you think you have your timing down, then a true start attempt can be made.

Turn on tank gas supply, making sure the ball valve is closed. Vent the engine cylinder as described above, then open the decompressiin valve and turn the engine to just past TDC. Close decompression valve. Open air supply valve fully and turn the engine thru its first compression stroke when the engine comes back to TDC, open air valve second tima AND open gas ball valve. If the engine has enough speed up, it should carry thru a 3rd compression stroke and start. DO NOT open air valve again! You do not want to 'super charge' the cylinder with compressed air. If the engine does not start, close gas ball valve and open decompression valve. Turn engine to open exhaust port. Open air valve to vent cylinder for a few minutes. Set the engine at just after TDC, Close the decompression valve and re-do the start procedure.

Using air start is just a matter of timing and gettting enough air quickly into the cylinder. The version I gave you here is just a start. You will need to practice a bit before putting gas to the intake.
Andrew
Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Andrew Mackey For This Post:
  #17  
Old 03-07-2019, 08:01:47 AM
Peter Holmander Peter Holmander is offline
Subscriber
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: West Greenwich, Rhode Island
Posts: 654
Thanks: 1,112
Thanked 607 Times in 259 Posts
Default Re: Who's currently working on an Oilfield Engine??

You will never forget that trip to pick up the South Penn engine Andrew. It is etched in your memory forever. I remember the trip to pick up my Reid like it was yesterday. Coolspring is a special place. I have been there abut 3 times over the years. My wife goes along with me, but it's not really her thing. Just likes to see me happy. I am very lucky. If I were closer, I would become a volunteer there and have the pleasure of helping out with some exquisite engines. When going to the museum, it is best to stay near there and take two or three days to check it out. No way to enjoy what it has to offer in just one day.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 03-07-2019, 10:37:52 AM
Dwayne Fuller's Avatar
Dwayne Fuller Dwayne Fuller is online now
Subscriber
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Longview, Texas, USA
Posts: 2,247
Thanks: 3,468
Thanked 3,651 Times in 1,087 Posts
Default Re: Who's currently working on an Oilfield Engine??

My 25 Reid is stored at the Temple show grounds about 200 miles from home. I purchased all the parts for hot tube ignition last year but have not been down there to do the install. Maybe this summer?

My running buddy JR is working on his 8hp Reid. Wrist pin renewal and cleaning up the ring lands. Hope to have parts in a few weeks.

My Lufkin engine just sets and looks forlorn, almost like yard art. Maybe someday it will get the love and attention it needs.

Not oilfield but currently I am working on my 25 Fairbanks NB and 6hp Gade that has been in the project stack for 9 years. This semi-retirement is good.

Back in the day this was always the first forum I visited, sad that there is little traffic here nowadays. Let's all work to change that.
Reply With Quote
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Dwayne Fuller For This Post:
  #19  
Old 03-08-2019, 06:12:54 PM
David A. David A. is offline
Subscriber
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: De Queen, Arkansas, USA
Posts: 256
Thanks: 742
Thanked 177 Times in 67 Posts
Photo Re: Who's currently working on an Oilfield Engine?

been working on a couple diff engines, here's a Bovaird and seyfang half breed on ajax bed, bored and sleeved, runs pretty good utube vid link
https://youtu.be/q_6shNAwIFk
Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to David A. For This Post:
  #20  
Old 03-09-2019, 01:13:42 AM
Dwayne Fuller's Avatar
Dwayne Fuller Dwayne Fuller is online now
Subscriber
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Longview, Texas, USA
Posts: 2,247
Thanks: 3,468
Thanked 3,651 Times in 1,087 Posts
Default Re: Who's currently working on an Oilfield Engine?

David, nice running Bovarid. I love the simplicity of those half breeds. You have that one dialed in nicely. Bring it on down to my show on the 27th of April. Should fit right in with my loosely organized piles of scrap iron.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Dwayne Fuller For This Post:
Reply

Bookmarks


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

F o r u m Jump

Similar Threads Chosen at Random
Thread Thread Starter F o r u m Replies Last Post
Oilfield Engine Manuals Tom Geier Oil Field Engines & Related Equipment 2 09-17-2016 06:50:57 AM
Help with oilfield engine Ben Zimmerer Oil Field Engines & Related Equipment 6 11-04-2010 12:50:15 PM
Oilfield engine value BFromm Oil Field Engines & Related Equipment 2 04-11-2008 09:48:05 PM
13 HP Ball oilfield Engine Josh Antique Engine Archives 7 10-22-2004 12:22:23 PM
JC oilfield engine ? holmesjsh Antique Engine Archives 6 04-12-2004 11:34:30 AM


Use "Ctrl" mouse wheel to change screen size.
All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:57:14 PM.

Smokstak and Enginads site search!


All use is subject to our TERMS OF SERVICE
SMOKSTAK® is a Registered Trade Mark - A Community of Antique Engine Enthusiasts
Copyright © 2000 - 2019 by Harry Matthews P.O. Box 5612 - Sarasota, FL 34277