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Oil Field Engines & Related Equipment

Old Superior ID


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  #1  
Old 08-08-2010, 09:16:16 AM
Walt Roys Walt Roys is offline
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Default Old Superior ID

Here's a question for you oil field guys. When were the 2 stroke Superiors made? The one I'm asking about has a cross head.( I think that's what you call it) Is this what they call a " 1/2 breed? When were these built and how often do you find them? How do you control the speed ?
Thanks for a response.
Walt
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Old 08-08-2010, 10:08:07 AM
Andrew Mackey Andrew Mackey is offline
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Exclamation Re: Old Superior ID

Most often, speed was controlled loosely with the fuel mixture. These engines run with maximum volumetric effeciency - when they fire, they produce full powr, as the maximum amount of air is injested. The air intake is not unlike that of a diesel engine. There are no restrictions on the air intake - it is wide open. In effect, the engine would start slightly rich. As the engine gains speed, more air is injested, although fuel supply remains fixed. As rhe engine accellerates, the additional air leans the mixture until the air/fuel ratio can no longer support combustion. The engine then slows, and the mixture richens, and eventually it becomes rich enough to again support combustion. The engine then accellerates, and the cycle repeats. The RPM can vary by as much as 100 RPM, with no load. Loaded, the engine will slow more quickly, thus firing more often. Increasing the load , the engine fires more often, as it runs slower, until at some point, the engine is firing every compression stroke. Most often though, these engines were not loaded so heavily. The engine will deliver rated power at the RPM stated by the manufacturer, at which time the engine is 'hitting' at every top center. Most often though, the engine was used with the engine firing about 85% of the time. This speed allows for some additional cylinder cooling, during the 'miss' cycle, and also gives the engine a bit of reserve power.

During the 'miss' cycle, raw gas is passed thru the engine into the atmosphere. Now days the EPA frowns on this, causing many of the older engines to be taken out of service. The more 'effecient' throttle governed engines are now becoming the rule, rather than the exception.

Without pictures of the engine in question, we cannot tell if parts (such as a governor), are missing, or the specific design period, as many changes were made over the years. Please post some, if possible.
Andrew
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Old 08-08-2010, 11:59:13 AM
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Doug Waggonner Doug Waggonner is offline
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Default Re: Old Superior ID

There were 2 different types of 2 cycle Superiors.
The Early 2 cycle Superiors Looks similar to Bessemer's, i.e. Open Crank.
These Early 2 cycle Superiors are pretty cool in the fact they are Side Shaft Engines. I dont know of any other 2 cycle, open crank, cross head, side shaft engine made? So they have alot of monkey motion to look at when they are running. These used a Steam type governor to control the speed. These dont seem to be as common as the 4 cycle Superiors but I have seen a few of them around.
I currently need the rear connecting rod for a 25hp 2 cycle Superior, so if anyone has one? Call me!


The Late model 2 Cycle Superiors are just early model Ajax engines. Production on these started 1927 +/-. Radiator cooled, closed crank, V Belt Clutch. BUT, they are a side shaft engine! And alot of these are still used in the Oilfields. And just FYI on the late model Superior and all Ajax engines the first 2 numbers in the serial # is the year of manufacture.
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Old 08-08-2010, 01:22:58 PM
Jerry Sweet Jerry Sweet is offline
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Default Re: Old Superior ID

sometime during 1946,Superior got out of the horizontal,slow speed engines, to concentrate on there large multi cylinder industrial & marine engines.Ajax wanted to get back into gas engines,as there steam engine sales was slowing down,so they took over the slow speed horizontals.At that time they were using Ensign natural gas carburators and controling the speed with a flyweight governor and the butterfly in the carburator.Somtime later,they changed to a large butterfly for air only and a gas control valve.they were both controled by the same governor arm by individual,adjustable rods.Later on ,and up to the present time they stopped controling the air.They still used the same gas control valve,but it discharges into a hydraulic pump controlled injection valve in the center of the cylinder head,with the spark plug just below the injection valve.This way it puts the fuel it needs right at the spark plug.No unburned fuel goes out with the scavenge air,and the exhaust scavenges better,because there is no air restriction.Ajax still uses the same governor on all the systems.
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Old 08-08-2010, 03:54:26 PM
Walt Roys Walt Roys is offline
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Default Re: Old Superior ID

I just got a look at that Superior Engine. Ser.# 20441 30 hp. enclosed crank 2cycle . That thing is hugh and weighs some 10,000 lbs. I'll try to get some pics and put them on this sight. Anybody know the rated rpm. The engine looks to be complete with ball gov. and mag run and uses air start. What was the original color, blue? This was just purchased by a friend here in Brewster so maybe I'll even get to help make it run, what fun.
Walt
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Old 08-08-2010, 06:09:47 PM
Rod Fielder Rod Fielder is offline
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Default Re: Old Superior ID

here is a photo of my 20 superior 2 cylcle sideshaft. it runs like a caddy. smooth and quiet. photo shows governor, valve, and drillers wheel for the fuel control. hits about every 5 revs. runs very slow.

rod
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