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Horse Drawn Equipment Old iron designed for the purpose of hitching up to a horse or a team. This old iron machinery may be used or demonstrated while hooked to an old iron tractor too.

Horse Drawn Equipment

Need Help to Identify Some Walk-Behind Plows and Other Implements


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  #1  
Old 07-31-2018, 10:26:21 PM
EmersonFan EmersonFan is offline
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Default Need Help to Identify Some Walk-Behind Plows and Other Implements

Hello everyone.
My name is Mike and I'm an old junk addict.
It has been 2 months 2 days and 6 hours since my last old junk purchase.

Actually, I have a kind of unique position with regard to junk acquisition:
I don't really own hardly anything, but I'm a member of the board of an antique farm equipment museum, and my hobby is to figure out just what the heck we have.

I've had some fun trying to ID all the tractors. (50 plus)
And the cast iron implement seats. (730 plus)
And the flywheel engines (about 26)
And the hog oilers (around 28)

But today I'm trying to get a start on the plows, and other implements.
There are walk-behind plows - and other implements - I haven't counted them all yet.

And there are seated plows and other implements - I haven't counted them yet either.

I have some other resources too, but I thought it might be fun to get some input here. We will start with these 6 but there might be as many as 50 -

I think these four are all Emerson Brantingham implements
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Old 07-31-2018, 10:29:54 PM
EmersonFan EmersonFan is offline
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Default Re: Need help to identify some walk-behind plows and other implements

Here are the first two seated implements.
I know a bit about the 1st one but the second one, not so much.

the 1st pic here is The JD Gilpin seated plow.
the 2nd pic is a random shot of some implement seats and a random cast iron artifact.
the 3rd pic is an Emerson Brantingham hillside plow
the 4th pic is the Emerson Brantingham Model L tractor - and my grandson Conner.
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Old 07-31-2018, 11:21:04 PM
Heins Heins is offline
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Default Re: Need help to identify some walk-behind plows and other implements

I don't know about the third plow being a hill side plow, it looks to me like a plow that will plow back and forth. One way the right bottom will plow and the other direction, the left bottom will plow.
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Old 08-01-2018, 09:00:42 AM
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Default Re: Need help to identify some walk-behind plows and other implements

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Originally Posted by Heins View Post
I don't know about the third plow being a hill side plow, it looks to me like a plow that will plow back and forth. One way the right bottom will plow and the other direction, the left bottom will plow.
I would call that a two-way plow, but I have heard other people call them hill side plows. I guess they work well in that application.
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Old 08-01-2018, 10:28:09 AM
EmersonFan EmersonFan is offline
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Default Re: Need help to identify some walk-behind plows and other implements

heins - I think you are right; I'll go look at it again; it would make no sense to throw two furrows in opposite directions. Only one moldboard would be down at a time. Instead of going in circles, you go back and forth on a hillside. Like you said, use the left side one way and the right side the other way. The mechanism for lifting one plow share at a time must be pretty clever.

---------- Post added at 09:28:09 AM ---------- Previous post was at 09:25:37 AM ----------

Now that I think about it, we might have another of these; it will be interesting to look at the Emerson Brantingham one here, then the other one, to see how they are different.
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Old 08-01-2018, 10:44:38 AM
Bruce B. Bruce B. is offline
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Default Re: Need Help to Identify Some Walk-Behind Plows and Other Implements

Quote:
Originally Posted by EmersonFan View Post
I think these four are all Emerson-Brantingham implements
Three of those walking plows are apparently by E-B; the one in the third photo, however, was manufactured by Belcher & Taylor of western Massachusetts.

The plow was designed with a share that would swivel from one side to another so that the plowman did not have to return to the beginning of the furrow in order to throw the soil in the same direction.

Worth noting that the example in your organization's collection does not have its original paint, and is missing its coulter (and that there were at least two different styles of coulter).






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Old 08-01-2018, 11:01:50 AM
Bruce B. Bruce B. is offline
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Default Re: Need help to identify some walk-behind plows and other implements

Quote:
Originally Posted by EmersonFan View Post
the 2nd pic is a random shot of some implement seats and a random cast-iron artifact.
The cast-iron artifact is a wheel hub cover from a John Deere "Big No. 4" horse-drawn sickle bar mower, as can be seen in the picture below (found with an on-line search -- not my image).

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  #8  
Old 08-04-2018, 12:32:42 AM
EmersonFan EmersonFan is offline
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Default Re: Need Help to Identify Some Walk-Behind Plows and Other Implements

the third one of these four; the Swivel Plow, is NOT an Emerson Brantingham.
The Yankee swivel plow was made in MA

---------- Post added at 11:32:42 PM ---------- Previous post was at 11:26:13 PM ----------

Thanks, Bruce!
That's a nice picture.
I just spoke with a fellow today who has memories of operating one of these - pulling it with a farm tractor.
He said once you get it working it's not too hard.
I did some mowing with a tractor with a PTO shaft - keeping the sycle working was hard enough with a PTO shaft; I can't imagine using one of these where the only power comes from the wheels.
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Old 08-06-2018, 12:16:30 AM
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Default Re: Need Help to Identify Some Walk-Behind Plows and Other Implements

It's impossible to explain how much I feel like I've accomplished something here, when Red Foxx called it "COordinating" . . . we had this area on the floor with a bunch of walk-behind implements, I still don't really know how many. . . they were just all piled there and they are all rusty and you can't tell where one starts and the other ends.

Then, there is this loft area that is not well-built but there is a vacant area.
I've kind of thought for several months that if those walk-behind implements (Mostly moldboard plows but a couple cultivators and some seeders as well) were lined up there on the edge it would be MUCH easier for people to see them.

Well, yesterday and today, we got that done.

Now, I'll get some laminated index cards or something to identify each one, and pick up where I left off a few days ago.
I think a smaller collection, like 6 or 8 plows, 1 or 2 cultivators and one seeder will represent the period.
Some should be put in storage, some should be painted, etc. I'm looking forward to getting some feedback on which ones to showcase and which ones aren't so important

And, there is a lot of lumber here; I am hoping to get some good advice here ab out what I can paint or spray or brush on them to help the wood survive. I've got a couple different brands of wood hardener and I plan to experiment to see which ones work best, but any suggestions are appreciated.

Pictures:
01 - this is the spot where there used to be a big jumble of plows
02 - this is the high-tech method we used to move them from one end of a building to the other (longer than a bball court, not quite a football field)
03 - new display area - these implements are just slightly more than eye-level and you can walk down the row and look at each one. Once I get some more information and put a nice sign on each one it will make even more sense.
04 - example of what a single-moldboard plow looks like up on the edge of the loft.
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Old 08-06-2018, 01:25:04 PM
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Default Re: Need Help to Identify Some Walk-Behind Plows and Other Implements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce B. View Post
Three of those walking plows are apparently by E-B; the one in the third photo, however, was manufactured by Belcher & Taylor of western Massachusetts.

The plow was designed with a share that would swivel from one side to another so that the plowman did not have to return to the beginning of the furrow in order to throw the soil in the same direction.

Worth noting that the example in your organization's collection does not have its original paint, and is missing its coulter (and that there were at least two different styles of coulter).






Bruce: Regarding your comment: " the example in your organization's collection does not have its original paint" . . . IF we were to repaint this, do you know what the original colors would be?
Also, and the priority of this is growing: What can I paint, or spray on these and many other wooden artifacts that will preserve from rotting, dry-rot, and bug infestation?
We seem to have a small number of artifacts that have been invested with some rare damn bug that
1 - usually ONLY lives in the pacific northwest, and
2 - usually ONLY attacks soft woods, and
3 - hibernates up to 200 years.

We think it may have been introduced by a log roller - the larvae might have been in the tree before it was turned in to a roller. Now, not only have these damn insects attacked hardwoods (Handles, specifically) but we are really worried about them spreading.
So if we can figure out one specific substance that we can use to treat all old wooden artifacts, to delay or prevent decay and to prevent these bugs from spreading that would be good. Any suggestion would be appreciated.

Back to the original topic: I noticed where the Coulter goes when I was there this weekend; rather an obvious socket that is missing something.
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Old 08-06-2018, 11:50:26 PM
Bruce B. Bruce B. is offline
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Post re: Museum Collection Concerns

Quote:
Originally Posted by EmersonFan View Post
I just spoke with a fellow today who has memories of operating one of these - pulling it with a farm tractor.
He said once you get it working it's not too hard. <snip> I can't imagine using one of these where the only power comes from the wheels.
When I was a kid my dad and I mowed our back field with an old Deering sickle-bar mower (just to keep the field from filling in with bushes and trees, not for fodder). Designed to be pulled by two horses, but we pulled it with a home-made tractor. The mower cut OK in good hay, but in thick, weedy grass the knife tended to clog -- requiring me to throw the ground drive out of gear, dismount from the seat and clear the clog from between the sections. Once clear, I'd get on the mower seat again, Dad would back up a few feet, I'd throw the ground drive back into gear, and he'd lurch forward to give the mower a jolt. Perhaps a bit hard on the wooden pitman arm, but usually remedied the situation -- until the next time it clogged.

A sickle-bar mower is impressive, though, when everything is working as it should... just imagine being on such a mower behind a team of horses, when the only noises are the clink of harness buckles and the snick-snick-snick of the sickle -- and the sight of grass or alfalfa falling behind it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by EmersonFan View Post
It's impossible to explain how much I feel like I've accomplished something here <snip>
You HAVE accomplished something of value. Any time you take a jumble of anything in a dark corner of a museum and organize it into something visitors will like to stop and look at (perhaps even learn something), that is time well spent.

Quote:
Originally Posted by EmersonFan View Post
I'll get some laminated index cards or something to identify each one
That, too, is time well spent -- people need to know what they are looking at, where it came from, who used it, etc. Suggestion: If you know who donated the artifact, give that person credit on your signage... people like seeing that Uncle Bob donated Gramp's old cultivator, plow, etc. -- and that sometimes results in donations of money or additional artifacts.

Quote:
Originally Posted by EmersonFan View Post
Some should be put in storage <snip>
Suggestion: Put about a third of your museum's collection in storage (the smaller items, anyway), and maximize the amount of space visitors have to walk around some of the larger items. That way, your exhibit area won't feel so crowded. Plus, you will be able to rotate artifacts in and out of your display area every year or so, so that folks who make repeat visits will see something different on future visits. If the displays never change, why return? ("We've seen all that already.")

Quote:
Originally Posted by EmersonFan View Post
And, there is a lot of lumber here; I am hoping to get some good advice here about what I can paint or spray or brush on them <snip>
If you are seeking to preserve original paint or pinstriping, a lot of folks here on the 'Stak swear by a product named Penetrol, and claim that it soaks in and brightens faded colors.

Quote:
Originally Posted by EmersonFan View Post
<snip> IF we were to repaint this, do you know what the original colors would be?
If that B&T swivel plow were in my collection, I'd probably leave it as is, unless your museum has a volunteer who loves to paint and is willing to donate hours of his/her time and underwrite the cost of such a project. The condition is similar to the other plows on display in your exhibit, so it's not an eyesore. Plus, you don't want to offend whomever it was that did the paint job it has now. (Never aggravate your volunteers; they are unpaid workers not because they are worthless, but because they are priceless!)

As for the original colors, the first antique B&T trade card I attached to message #6 above shows all the wooden parts (with the exception of the very ends of the handles) painted red, with all other iron/steel parts (with the exceptions of the plowshare and coulter) painted black. If you want to get fancy, you could bead-blast the share to bright steel, and then lacquer it, followed by a stylized stencil with the B&T "steeled metal" logo. (If you are able to locate or replicate a straight-shank coulter, treat the cutting area the same as the share, and paint the hilt portion black.)

Again, though, such a project would not be high on my list of priorities, given the long to-do list most small organizations have.

Quote:
Originally Posted by EmersonFan View Post
Also, and the priority of this is growing: What can I paint, or spray on these and many other wooden artifacts that will preserve from rotting, dry-rot, and bug infestation?
We seem to have a small number of artifacts that have been infested with some rare damn bug <snip>
DO NOT DELAY! There's a reason for the old proverb, "a stitch in time..." You are aware of an infestation, and the problem will only grow with each passing day.

Suggestions:
  1. Consult with other museums in your area; ask their directors/curators for advice. It's even possible that there is grant money out there to preserve your artifacts, but you won't know until you investigate.
  2. Contact a pest-control company; ask for an estimate, and be sure to get info about whether their methods will affect artifact surfaces (e.g., will their sprays, powders, etc. damage painted surfaces, or cause corrosion on metals?)
  3. Contact your state historic-preservation office and ask for advice/help. Your tax dollars help fund the salary of a person or persons who get paid to know about such things. Try this web site as a starting point.
Quote:
Originally Posted by EmersonFan View Post
Back to the original topic: I noticed where the Coulter goes when I was there this weekend; rather an obvious socket that is missing something.
You may possibly have that coulter under your roof; sometimes metal pieces/parts get separated from their original assemblies, and a well-meaning employee/volunteer who doesn't recognize it will place it in an area far removed. So, look through any piles of "random artifacts" for a straight-shank coulter (that appears to be what is missing, although it's worth noting that B&T apparently offered different styles of coulter). Failing that, find a local blacksmith (they're out there if you ask around) who will replicate one for you.

Guess that's about it... apologies for the long post -- there was much to convey.


.
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Old 08-08-2018, 02:00:09 PM
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Default Re: Museum Collection Concerns

Thanks very much for the insight, Bruce.
I really appreciate you taking the time.
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Old 08-09-2018, 02:23:56 PM
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Default Re: Need Help to Identify Some Walk-Behind Plows and Other Implements

Well, we got 5 tractors and 2 trailers to the Boone co fair, and I got the display trailer to Dekalb County. Next, I am trying to get info from old guys; that's my ongoing quest, we have 3 more days at the Boone Co Fair, I have to go stand by the display trailer Saturday, and I still want to see the Dekalb Co fair - I've never been to that, it's close, and they say they get a great bunch of stuff there. You can't die as long as there are unfinished chores, right?
So yesterday AFTER the fair, I stopped by the museum with these new laminated numbered cards to put on all the walk-behind implements. I only have pictures of two more I didn't have before to post here.

I'll just stick this in here - #09 is a small planter.
The potato-digger is #10 and the two-bottom walking plow is #11 in the Paulson collection.
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Old 08-09-2018, 02:28:38 PM
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Default Re: Need Help to Identify Some Walk-Behind Plows and Other Implements

OK, here are the pictures for the small wooden planter:
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Old 08-09-2018, 02:31:54 PM
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Default Re: Need Help to Identify Some Walk-Behind Plows and Other Implements

And here is the t wo-bottom walk-behind plow.
There is one really big hint here; this says Oliver and it also says V267
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