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Steam Stationary Engines, Traction Engines

1860's engine builder ad


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  #1  
Old 11-07-2009, 07:51:30 PM
David Hoover David Hoover is offline
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Default 1860's engine builder ad

has anyone any info. on this early company?
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  #2  
Old 11-08-2009, 01:04:39 AM
Jim Mackessy Jim Mackessy is offline
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Default Re: 1860's engine builder ad.

I've run accross this one before, but I can't remember where. There were several foundries in Geneva that made steam engines and boilers, the best known was probably the Dunning foundry known as "The New York Central Iron Works". William B. Dunning apprenticed in Syracuse, but his reputation as a top notch machinist caused foundry owner Thomas D Burrell of Geneva's "Burrell Foundry" to entice him to come to Geneva in 1841. He was associated with several of the local foundries before striking out on his own in 1853, when he founded the N.Y.C. Iron Works with an investment of $75.00. His primary product was heating boilers. That company moved to Hagerstown, Maryland in 1912, and continued to do tank and boiler work into the 1970's.
I don't have time tonight, but if you want to research this, try going to Google Books and searching for histories of Geneva and histories of whatever county Geneva is in, the older the better. Most of these will have information on what businesses were there, as their efforts to write and publish these were often sponsored by local business interests. This will give you the names of the principals, one of which you already have. Search these names, and so on, until you feel you have exhausted the topic. Do the same on the "Internet Archive" site, and on the "Making of America" site. Before you'
re done you will have had hits on geneological sites, newspaper sites, and hopefully obituary notices in trade publications, which will include enough info to start another round of searches. Keep a notebook handy and write it all down, as well as the source name. My copy of Kenneth Cope's "American Steam Engine Builders" is growing fat with added pages of info I have found, and I'm only working on New York state based builders. On later builders, patent info is also helpful and adds to your information. The usual warning does apply, however...this can be addicting! Happy Hunting! - Jim Mackessy
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Old 11-08-2009, 01:10:07 AM
Jim Mackessy Jim Mackessy is offline
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Default Re: 1860's engine builder ad.

Whoops, your picture says Canandaigua, and I'm off to the races about Geneva, the next town to the east of significance. The research advice still applies, however. Now you're going to have me looking too! I'll report back here if I find anything out. - Jim M.
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Old 11-08-2009, 09:57:47 AM
David Hoover David Hoover is offline
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Default Re: 1860's engine builder ad.

thank you very much for the tips. This proves that some addictions can be good lol. the only negative reaction i've found so far is that i hear "get the hell off the computer" a little more often.
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Old 11-08-2009, 05:55:17 PM
Bud Tierney Bud Tierney is offline
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Default Re: 1860's engine builder ad.

With your ad on pg 3 of 1867/68 Business Directory, I assume you've seen the listing on page 17...
usgennet.org says JS Robinson bought out Herendeen in 1865, began mfr of chilled plow 1876 (differing opinions who invented process) "principal works at Syracuse", local works closed, resumed by JS Robinson & Son 1878....
(Syracuse Chilled Plow Co says originally Robinson Chilled Plow; Syracuse sold to Deere 1910, so JS must've parted ways in 1878).
Robinson Chilled Plow Co entered plows in 1884 Ag show, but no mentions of engines.
It'd be helpful to know what research you've done, so as not to replow plowed ground (pun intended)!!--LOL
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Old 11-08-2009, 06:48:58 PM
Jim Mackessy Jim Mackessy is offline
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Default Re: 1860's engine builder ad.

David;
I'm no stranger to getting heat for being on the computer too much, either. Bud has found out things I didn't know about Syracuse Chilled Plow. What I can add is that they ran the Syracuse plant on two Greene Stationary Engines, and switched to two Uniflows in the 1920's. - Jim Mackessy
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Old 11-09-2009, 08:07:38 PM
David Hoover David Hoover is offline
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Default Re: 1860's engine builder ad.

I was asked by a friend who thinks they may be a relation to J.S Robinson to find out as much as possible on the co.. and perhaps find any sketchs of equip. made by them. Thanks for your help.
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  #8  
Old 11-09-2009, 09:32:04 PM
Jim Mackessy Jim Mackessy is offline
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Default Re: 1860's engine builder ad.

Does he think his ties are more Syracuse based, or from the earlier company location of Canandaigua? I don't have much in the way of pictures, except for a postcard of the Syracuse plant. A few years back I did see one of the Syracuse Chilled Plows in an antique store for $50. My wife did not hold it in the same high regard as I did, so it stayed there! - Jim Mackessy
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Old 11-10-2009, 01:45:42 AM
Bud Tierney Bud Tierney is offline
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Default Re: 1860's engine builder ad

Well, don't have much to add...
JS was John S, and the son of JS Robinson & Son was Edson C, if I'm deciphering my scribbling correctly...
Edson died 1n 1900; his obit says he worked as bkkpr "in his fathers office for two years" (this would probably be in Syracuse, where JS was VP)joined his father as partner in Robinson Chilled Plow Co in 1878 (this would probably be the resumed Canadaigua company after JS split with Syracuse), after his fathers death associated himself with "several capitalists", and ran the company until his own death. His bio sets out his children.
Oddly enough, the Superintendant of the Syracuse Works was Harry Wiard, son(??) of the other man sometimes named as the inventor of the Chilled Plow process; sounds like some kind of compromise on cutting up the profits.
No mentions of any steam engine in what little I found, and nothing after 1900.
Canandigua is at the N end of the smallest of the four largest finger lakes, 15 mi N-S and 2+(??) E-W; it had a ferry going N-S, so it's possible any steam engine might've been for a boat (didn't see anything on oldmarineengine, but index of NY boat engine builders, if any available, might have something.
No doubt more research will turn up more info.
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Old 11-10-2009, 01:51:14 AM
David Hoover David Hoover is offline
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Default Re: 1860's engine builder ad

i'll pass all this on and see if i can get her to come on here and ask for herself. thanks again
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  #11  
Old 11-10-2009, 02:47:15 PM
Bud Tierney Bud Tierney is offline
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Default Re: 1860's engine builder ad

Made another stab at this...
Turned up piece about the lake ferries from the 8-9-22 Ontario County Times (crookedlakereview.com/etc??)...
Seems "Capt" John Robinson, "later the well known foundryman of the village" built a lake steamer in 1858 named the Henry B Gibson, later renamed the Naples...It didn't specifically refer to it's engine, so can't say for sure he also built the steam engine...
Another lake ferry Capt was Ed Herendeen...
The foundry business was Robinson & Herendeen before JS/John S bought out Herendeen, but I don't know if the "Capt" Herendeen was his partner; various other sites reveal Herendeen are quite thick around Canandaigua today.
It might be advisable to be cautious if making inquiries of Herendeens; the buyout may or may not've been amicable...
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Old 11-10-2009, 08:03:08 PM
Bud Tierney Bud Tierney is offline
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Default Re: 1860's engine builder ad

Forgot to add the NY Cptn Comm website search shows none of these names:
Robinson & Herendeen
Canandaigua Iron Foundry & Machine Works
Robinson Chilled Plow Co
JS Robinson & Son...
However, State site also says under General Law 130 many names filed with County Clerk of County in which business etc located, so you should check with Ontario County Clerk. Didn't find any online record, so there'll probably be a fee, which could be excessive (OR wants $50--repeat: $50USD--for a search more than 10 years back!!)...
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