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Drag Saw Collectors Water cooled drag saws; Hercules, Ottawa, Wade, Vaughan, Witte, Timberwolf and Multnomah

Drag Saw Collectors

Multnomah Problems


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  #1  
Old 11-05-2015, 01:13:15 AM
Larrylo Larrylo is offline
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Default Multnomah Problems

Hello All: I have a Multnomah drag saw that my dad bought in the 50's
He couldn't get it to run properly and neither can I . It will start when you pull
on the flywheel but, after only about 5 seconds , there is a backfire and it
stops. It is quite difficult to restart but, when it does, the same occurs . After
repeated restarts it will run for longer periods of time but, not much longer
than 20 seconds. I have replaced all the wiring and made certain the connections are clean. The spark plug is new but ,I wonder if the problem is
a faulty buzz coil or is the crank contact assembly too loose or the contact
occurring for too long during the crankshaft rotation? I'll bet there's some one
who's had this problem before. That's it!
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  #2  
Old 11-07-2015, 10:42:12 PM
GameFarmOne GameFarmOne is offline
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Default Re: Multnomah Problems

Larry, I'm certainly no expert on the dragsaws, but I've worked on two or three of them.
Not familiar with the Multnomah, but if it's a two stroke the problem could be as simple as setting the timing right, or fuel mix.
The old two strokes will run either way, depending on the position of the timer.
A problem I recently encountered with a Vaughan engine was a little different than the usual.
It acted just like your describing, would backfire, or run 1-2 revolutions, then nothing.
I finally took it apart, and found that almost all of the intake and exhaust ports were blocked off with a hard black soot. Took almost a whole day to get all of that chipped out, and the ports cleaned. It had set up like black cement.
Somebody on Smokstak who knows a lot more than I do told me that it probably wasn't run hard enough before it was shut down and stored, and also probably had too much oil in the mix.
You might have a different problem, but something to check.
Another thing I've learned on the two strokes is to check for any bad gaskets, or leaky engine plugs/petcocks, etc. They have to be tight from front to back in order to pull fuel in and vaporize it in order to fire.
If your engine is four stroke, of course the first place I'd look would be timing/valves, etc.


gamefarmone
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Old 11-10-2015, 02:51:01 AM
Larrylo Larrylo is offline
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Default Re: Multnomah Problems

Well, my engine is two stoke . My Dad I should use a 16/1 mixture of gas/ oil.
Is that too rich? Also, my engine uses a casting that has no removable head.
How is it possible to check the intake port without removing the crank/ piston
assembly? I'm afraid of damaging the rings as I suspect nothing is available.
Thanks everyone for looking at my request, Larrylo
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Old 11-11-2015, 03:11:14 AM
Larrylo Larrylo is offline
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Default Re: Multnomah Problems

Hello gamefarmone:
My engine is a two stroke and I've been running a 16/1 gas oil mix. Is that too rich? Also,
my engine has cast block with no removable cylinder head so, how do you check for a
plugged intake port ? Another thing of note: How do you determine if the engine is worn
out? It seems to have enough compression but, is it enough?
Thanks Larrylo
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Old 11-11-2015, 02:55:27 PM
GameFarmOne GameFarmOne is offline
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Default Re: Multnomah Problems

Larry, as I mentioned, I'm no two stroke expert, but here's what I've gleaned from my experience and advice from others.
First, the mix of 16/1 is what some people recommend, although others use a lighter mix. Most everybody I've talked to do agree, though that it's better to use a good grade 30 wt. non-detergent motor oil instead of the modern two stoke oil, as the old engines were designed to run on that.
I personally don't see how that would make much of a difference for just light running, but maybe so.
The best jackleg way to check the suction and compression is to have somebody spin the flywheel, and cover the fuel/air intake with your hand and see if the engine is pulling air in.
Likewise, take the plug out, and cover it with your thumb, etc., to make sure that there is compression there. A cylinder compression checker is best, of course, providing you have one that has an adapter that fits your plug hole threads. (Of course, make sure the fuel/ignition is disconnected when you check it) It takes surprisingly little compression to fire most of the old two strokes up, but if you have little to none, probably looking at a ring job, or maybe something like what I ran into.
There's no way to pull the piston/or check intake- exhaust internal ports without pulling the engine apart. Don't know how your Multnomah's made, but you may be lucky and be able to pull it apart above the crank housing,and slide the bore housing up off the piston.
It's not much more work to pull the crank housing apart, although whether or not the flywheel threads on or is just keyed and pressed makes a big, big difference in how complicated that can be.
There are several people here on Smokstak that can give great advice on your logsaw.
I'd read all the posts I could, and pm as many as I could.
Also post a few pictures of the progress-would like to see'em!

gamefarmone
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  #6  
Old 08-17-2016, 02:00:30 AM
Larrylo Larrylo is offline
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Default Re: Multnomah Problems

Hello All:
After a lot of head scratching I came up with the solution to my problem.
The buzz coil was the fault. I bought a used one from a fella at the
Abbotsford swap meet . He specializes in parts for model "T" Fords and sold
me one that he'd tested and assured that it was good. Mine had to have had some sort of internal poor connection.
Thanks all John T.
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