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Oil Field Engines & Related Equipment

Workshop engine


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  #11  
Old 09-23-2013, 09:23:10 AM
jsfoley jsfoley is offline
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Default Re: Workshop engine

Hello,
I have a twenty hp Reid for sale that would be nice to run your line shaft.

Thanks, Jon Foley
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  #12  
Old 09-23-2013, 05:09:06 PM
48bomber 48bomber is offline
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Default Re: Workshop engine

Jon,
I am interested in your ried! Here's the questions!
Pictures?
What do you have it running on for fuel?
Do you know how much fuel it uses?
Is it usable to run a line shaft shop now?
What have you done to the engine , and its condition?
How hard is it to start ? The engine will likely be run several times a day and I need one that I can get started!

There is a video of a nice ried running a lineshaft in a blacksmith shop that is incredible!
Sorry for all the questions! Oh how much are you thinking for price?
Andy Sharpe
Canadian Woodenware Co.
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  #13  
Old 09-23-2013, 09:34:38 PM
Ray Ethridge Ray Ethridge is offline
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Default Re: Workshop engine

if your lineshaft does in fact require 60 HP electric you are going to need a much larger engine than a 20 HP Reid. My guess would be at least an 80 HP or so. You need to do a little investigation into what your real load is going to be first.
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  #14  
Old 09-24-2013, 05:38:40 PM
48bomber 48bomber is offline
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Default Re: Workshop engine

Hey all!
So I have been told that a 1 1/2 , 20 , 25 and 80 hp would be needed to run the lineshafts and tools. The electric motor was oversized in hp when I seen it running.It is 60hp and a speed of 600 rpm. There must be a way to convert electric motor hp to a engine hp. There is a 4 sided moulder , and a large bandsaw resaw that would use up a fair bit of hp , but would not be run at the same time. A 48" dust collector is on all the time , but turns very easily. I know a 5 hp electric would run the dust collector on its own.
When I see the video of the machine shop on you tube with a large ried running it easily, I am hoping that a 17 1/2 ruston will do it. So far that is the engine I think I am wanting.
Thanks for the continued information from all!
Andy
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  #15  
Old 09-24-2013, 09:44:57 PM
48bomber 48bomber is offline
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Default Re: Workshop engine

I made a mistake on my last post. The electric motor is 40 hp! I went to the shop and double checked it today.
Andy
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  #16  
Old 09-24-2013, 10:26:39 PM
Ray Ethridge Ray Ethridge is offline
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Default Re: Workshop engine

One horsepower is and always will be one horsepower regardless of where it comes from. It is a unit of measure. The problem comes in the way electric motor power is rated vs the way a gas or diesel is rated. An electric motor is designed to run at its rated horsepower for 100% of the time, and can sustain overloads substantially larger for a short period of time. Well at least commercial duty ones are, not the consumer peak power ratings you see on handsaws and drills and such. On the other hand a gasoline engine or diesel engine rating is measured on a dyno pretty much at its maximum. If you overload a gas engine on the dyno when you are at its peak horsepower you will stall the engine. There is no reserve. Now lets assume you have a 350 chevy engine,rated at 350 HP. Yes you can get 350 HP out of it for some period of time, but if you want to be able to run that engine for a very long time you better be running it at a horsepower level more like 150-200 HP. Granted oilfield engines like the Reid were designed to run at their rated horsepower, but who really thinks that an engine that is 100 plus years old is going to be capable of running continuous duty at its rated horsepower? Maybe it will, maybe it won't, my money is on the the won't. Especially without a full rebuild. They would probably loaf along at half the rated horsepower most of the time unless you got one that was really worn out. So the dust collector that can be run on a 5 HP electric motor is going to eat up the better part of 10 hp original rating. Are we talking running the other items with a second 5 HP electric? Then we are talking a 20 HP engine at least. The thing that concerns me is that the original electric motor is a 60 HP. If it truly did take that kind of horsepower to run that lineshaft, then using the approximations I am throwing out would require a 120 HP engine. I doubt the lineshaft was eating that kind of power because the friction that would be causing that much load would have burned down the building long ago. So something there sucks a lot of horsepower. Maybe a machine that is not there anymore?
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  #17  
Old 09-25-2013, 03:58:24 PM
Bob Willman Bob Willman is offline
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Default Re: Workshop engine

A photo of my Superior Type C in the blacksmith shop.

Bob
WB8NQW
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  #18  
Old 09-25-2013, 04:29:33 PM
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Tom Winland Tom Winland is offline
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Default Re: Workshop engine

Check out my 17 HP Ruston I have for sale on my web page

http://gasenginetom.com/FOR_SALE.html

here is a video
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ECNcxpDrPv4
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  #19  
Old 09-25-2013, 09:24:39 PM
48bomber 48bomber is offline
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Default Re: Workshop engine

Ray,
Thanks for the information on HP rating, it helps. I agree the electric motor seems big . I went and double checked it and I made a mistake and it is 40 hp .
If I try to estimate what hp electric motor size would be needed for a machine and add them up it should give me the hp needed for a engine . For example the dust collector would need 5 hp if run with electric, and the cut off saw would need 3 hp if run by electric . The draw on the motor would be 8 hp.
The largest planer has 4 heads needing 5hp each for top and bottom, and 3 hp each for the 2 side heads is a total of 16 hp. Add in 5 hp for the dust collector and the total is 21hp max needed.
Also should add in likely 5 hp for the power to turn the shafts and idler pulleys.
it adds up to 26 hp. Hmmm interesting...
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  #20  
Old 09-25-2013, 10:32:23 PM
Jack Innes Jack Innes is offline
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Default Re: Workshop engine

[QUOTE=Tom Winland;959418]Check out my 17 HP Ruston I have for sale on my web page

http://gasenginetom.com/FOR_SALE.html

Tom mentions on his page that the engine needs a head gasket. This is not a big problem. I had a copper sandwich gasket made for my 40 hp Clark engine which likely is a larger gasket than this engine needs. Gaskets to Go made it for $49.95 in two weeks & it took 5 days to get here from Thailand. I have heard many good reports on their service.
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