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Onan Generators Restoring, operating and maintaining vintage Onan generators.

Onan Generators

Nice little job to do:


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  #11  
Old 08-02-2017, 01:22:52 PM
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Default Re: Nice little job to do:

I agree completely with the above posts. Weight should be over the rear axle. With the weight on the back, the the steering control could be compromised. The guy needs a certified engineer to draw it up.
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  #12  
Old 08-02-2017, 03:41:36 PM
PnishrPW PnishrPW is offline
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Default Re: Nice little job to do:

Within the constraints of GVW, and above/forward of the rear axle I wouldn't foresee any issues. Given the above caveats, I wouldn't think an engineer would be required. But, then again, my engineering degree is via Redneck U...
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Old 08-02-2017, 03:42:51 PM
len k len k is offline
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Default Re: Nice little job to do:

As a kid the city dumped a bunch of cobble stones in a friend's hole near us. Dad had me retrieve them to use as curbing for our house. After carrying them up 30 ft hill I laid them uniformly in back of a 1/2 ton pickup, then added 2nd layer. As I turned steering wheel to make a corner the front tires 1/2 slid over the road, not wanting to turn the truck. Felt !!!!!

And center of bed was over the rear axal, would be worse with weight beyond the bumper.
Saving grace might be that it's a long truck, but devil is in the details of weights, wheelbase, distance from load to rear axel. Assuming framing is of proper size, if bolting it up I'ld check shear and tension stress in the bolts. Don't want to use too small dia bolts.

Last edited by len k; 08-02-2017 at 09:44:28 PM.
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  #14  
Old 08-02-2017, 04:35:52 PM
YellowLister YellowLister is offline
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Default Re: Nice little job to do:

He can always put a tow truck counter weight bumper on it.. would make a nice battering ram for people that cut him off and he can't stop being so heavy
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Old 08-02-2017, 05:04:16 PM
geezer88 geezer88 is offline
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Default Re: Nice little job to do:

Big load behind the rear axle is an accident waiting to happen. Ford found this out the hard way:

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/rollover/

GMC lengthened their wheelbase instead. I don't know what the Mercedes vans have done, but the amount of weight you are talking about would concern me greatly.

Run, don't walk.

tom
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  #16  
Old 08-02-2017, 09:21:43 PM
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Default Re: Nice little job to do:

I'm out of the job complete with no hard feelings. He found a welding shop that will do the work as he desires. I didn't even have to piss him off to get out from under it which is good.

Hope all works his way as I never wish failure on anyone but this one didn't set well with me even prior to posting about it here.
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Old 08-03-2017, 12:19:47 AM
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Default Re: Nice little job to do:

You are a better person to tell the guy that you are not comfortable with the job HE wants you to do. You would feel like Hell if something happened and it was attributed to what you did. You will sleep better at nights
I have done automotive and equipment repair for over 40 years as a semi hobby and I have specific values and specifications as to how I will do the job.
My way is to do it ONCE, do it the right way and everyone is happy and SAFE.
I don't cut corners or Mickey Mouse ANYTHING. I also sleep well at nights.
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  #18  
Old 08-05-2017, 02:19:44 PM
Jim Marcozzi Jim Marcozzi is offline
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Default Re: Nice little job to do:

I do truck mods at my shop. This sounds like trouble because of the front/rear loading AND the "teeter totter" effect of adding this behind the rear axle, above and beyond OEM. If you contact the chassis manufacturer, they will have prints and specs available for all of the dimensions, weights, loads, etc. and what's allowable. Most will provide this to you as a PDF file.

As for the frame and if the (OEM chassis manufacturer allows frame mods with welding), Use the same size "C" channels as OEM. Cut the stock ones on the rear of the truck at a 30-45 angle and make the opposite image on the front of the new frame rails being added. Once welded, add at least a 3' long section of "C" channel whose opening of the "C" fits over the outside of the frame's new weld. Now weld this on over the splice.

I prefer welding, but some chassis manufacturers don't allow it and DOT rules will go by their recommendation in the event of an accident due to a frame failure.
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Old 08-05-2017, 02:54:16 PM
len k len k is offline
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Default Re: Nice little job to do:

chassis manufacturers don't allow welding........ most likely their structural steel is heat treated for increased strength so they can use thinner steel for reduced weight ( gas mileage). Welding anneals the heat treat and can weaken the steel.
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Old 08-05-2017, 05:54:59 PM
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Default Re: Nice little job to do:

Troll I have walked off many jobs. Because I didn't feel safe being on them. From having drunks or druggies on the job. To the job not being safe. Having all that weight on the back end and something goes wrong. You would be the first one the lawyers would come after. You made a wise choice to refuse the job
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