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What happened exactly to this tire?


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  #11  
Old 09-17-2017, 02:09:50 AM
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Toesmack Toesmack is offline
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Default Re: What happened exactly to this tire?

Have a look at any owners manual in any newer vehicle or rotation guide in any tire shop. They do indeed recommend reversal of rotation on radials.

I have had several trailer tires separate like that over the years. Age has always been the primary suspect. I keep newer tires on my personal trailers, and rarely have problems. Did have one grenade in spectacular fashion last summer though. One year old G rated trailer tire with 60% tread. Tire shop found a bolt sticking out of it. Went low on air and that caused enough heat that the sidewall blew out and was in tatters by the time I got it stopped. Tread had begun to part from the casing also.

For the date code you are looking for a small oval area with a hot stamp. If you find only 3 digits instead of 4, tire was mfg. prior to year 2000
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Old 09-17-2017, 12:56:55 PM
uglyblue66 uglyblue66 is offline
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Default Re: What happened exactly to this tire?

well I went and looked and danged if I can find a oval. I will see if the tire store can find it when i get them took off in the morning.
I have a new pair of Michlens to go on it so I won't have to buy tires. A friend put 2 tires on his vehicle and his wife crashed it with less than a 100 miles. So he saved the tires and lo and behold the new vehicle used a different size. So the tag is the worse expense I will have to replace.

I looked at the tire on the other side. I had sideswiped a rock with it a few weeks back. No cracks yesterday when i aired up the tires. Cracks today?!what the hello!? Must be age related.I bought them used but they were in nice shape right off a late model car.
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Old 09-17-2017, 02:22:19 PM
Gene Williams Gene Williams is offline
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Default Re: What happened exactly to this tire?

One never knows with tires these days. I bought 4 new 14 ply Sailun tires for one of our trailers, first one went at about 100 miles the next 2 within 3000 miles. The store replaced the first 2, I told them I did not need anymore of them on the 3rd. They gave me some money back sort of like pro-rating. The first one did not even have the molding nubs worn off when it went. The old scabs that I took off my pickup and put on the trailer rims for spares got me home every time. I was 300 to 500 miles out each time. Go figure.
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Old 09-17-2017, 04:48:17 PM
I like oldstuff I like oldstuff is offline
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Default Re: What happened exactly to this tire?

Thinking of trailer tires I looked at mine. It's an old UHaul I bought back when they would save and sell the frames and axles. Tires are from ~1990 and in great shape but getting weather cracked. So ima thinking time to replace them. Size is the old method, 6.70x15LT

With the plethora of Chin junk in the market, who has a solid recommendation of what to buy. Preferably not chin of course.
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Old 09-17-2017, 04:56:20 PM
J.B. Castagnos J.B. Castagnos is online now
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Default Re: What happened exactly to this tire?

If you have a trailer that seldom gets used you may want to consider bias tires, they last many years and usually don't separate.
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Old 09-17-2017, 07:01:18 PM
LCJudge LCJudge is offline
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Default Re: What happened exactly to this tire?

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Originally Posted by J.B. Castagnos View Post
Tommy, when radials first became popular, mfgs advised to keep tires in the same rotation for maximum mileage. Radials set up a wear pattern and when reversed this pattern is erased and starts again, causing a slight decrease in tire life. The American tires were falling apart due to poor quality, it got blamed on reversing rotation, It's now considered to be OK to reverse rotation and even recommended by mfgs to correct cupping wear patterns.
Thanks JB. When I said my situation happened a few years ago, I should have said many years ago, maybe 20 (or more...). The mid 90's doesn't seem that long ago.... until you start thinking about it. I'm glad you told me this. I can quit putting marks on my tires to make sure they always roll in the same direction.
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Old 09-17-2017, 07:26:59 PM
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Default Re: What happened exactly to this tire?

Quote:
Originally Posted by LCJudge View Post
Thanks JB. When I said my situation happened a few years ago, I should have said many years ago, maybe 20 (or more...). The mid 90's doesn't seem that long ago.... until you start thinking about it. I'm glad you told me this. I can quit putting marks on my tires to make sure they always roll in the same direction.
Early 1980's, my father's car came with Firestone steel belted radials. All was good until the tires were rotated at dealer. Few hundred miles later, he got vibration like out of balance, and I found tread separation. Shortly thereafter, another failed. Back to dealer, who said they cross switched them, as per manual, and took no responsibility. He bought 2 new tires, and then third failed. 4 new tires of another brand. Tire store said failures were caused by reversing direction of tire rotation. They said never cross switch radials, keep on same side of car.

I have been following that advice, and for the next 34 years, would not touch Firestone. Bought 4 about 18 months ago, and am not happy with them.
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Old 09-17-2017, 08:54:14 PM
J.B. Castagnos J.B. Castagnos is online now
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Default Re: What happened exactly to this tire?

That was the Firestone 721 era, more failures that had not been crossed than those that had, it was a piece of trash. Firestone was bought by Bridgestone, quality is up, good tire for the money now.

---------- Post added at 07:54:14 PM ---------- Previous post was at 07:41:32 PM ----------

Just a note, Michelin pioneered the steel tire. The first weren't raidials, before WWII. They wanted to share the technology with American tire mfgs because USA was fighting for them, they refused the help. Michelin has had some problem tires like everyone else, but they are generally the least troublesome tires. While talking about tires let me say that a tire should never be plugged, if done in an emergency, it should be removed and patched from the inside. The inside liner of the tire is the inner tube. When you plug it the glue gets wiped off and the outside is sealed, possibly the plug missed the hole on the inside or the glue didn't seal it. Air escaping the inside can't get out, it will make a bubble somewhere on the tire, separate the tread, or find another outlet. If it finds another outlet, another plug will be placed there, tread separation or another leak occurs. If another leak then another plug is inserted, probably allowing more air out and the tire is thown away because it's trash, all because it wasn't repaired correctly in the first place.
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Old 09-17-2017, 09:26:33 PM
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Default Re: What happened exactly to this tire?

Thank you J. B. Castagnos for that comment re: plugging tires. I thought I was the last person on the planet that insisted on patching. Tire shops insist that a plug is the best fix and least prone to come back. I can see why this is so. I watched some dufous try to patch a tire of mine (at a tire store, cost a bundle) and I just knew it would fail as he did everything wrong. The worst of it was, he completely and utterly shredded the patch with the little adhesion wheel (or whatever they call it). I'd have pointed this out to him but he was too busy telling me how he was the best tire man in the city for me to get a word in edgewise. The next day I was back. this time I insisted that the other jerk give it a try, since the expert failed so miserably. This guy told me he had The Answer - to put TWO patches on the tire, one on top of the other! Fortunately this time the tire held air. I'll never go back to that store again! I have to admit, after that experience and all the flak I get from my friends, plugs started looking pretty good. But thanks to your comments I will stick with the patches, no matter how many trips to the tire store it takes.
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Old 09-17-2017, 09:37:46 PM
J.B. Castagnos J.B. Castagnos is online now
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Default Re: What happened exactly to this tire?

Google Plug Patch. This is what we use, recommend by tire mfgs. It's a patch with a plug in the center, must be installed from the inside, plug pulled through to the outside. The plug fills the hole and helps keep rocks and water out, the patch seals the hole, keeps air in. The first thing that should be done when patching is to use a liquid buffer-cleaning fluid and a scraper to clean the silicone release agent from the inside. If the tire is buffed before this is done the silicone will be buffed into the rubber and the patch won't stick.
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