Oil Field Engines
[Home] - [HELP] - [Forums] - [Library] - [Photo Gallery] - [Groups] - [Classified Ads] - [Subscribe] - [Links] - [Books] - [Sponsors] -

Go Back   SmokStak > SmokStak® Antique Engine Community > Oil Field Engines & Related Equipment
Forgot Password? Join Us!

Notices

Oil Field Engines & Related Equipment OFES members otherwise known as "Oafs". If you like "BIG OLD GREASY RUSTY OIL FIELD ENGINES, you're in the right place. Founded by Russell Farmer.

Oil Field Engines & Related Equipment

JP Berry Engines


this thread has 24 replies and has been viewed 5995 times

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old 06-22-2018, 04:13:13 PM
SamC SamC is offline
Subscriber
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania, USA
Posts: 59
Thanks: 160
Thanked 91 Times in 25 Posts
Default Re: JP Berry Engines

Greetings, I have been able to finally haul this Berry home. It was brought home this past weekend when we went out to the farm near North Washington, PA. I always said about it being near Petrolia, but it is closest to North Washington, even though it has a Petrolia address. Anyhow, the engine is now at home, and I am able to do more to it, such as clean it up and get it ready to run. It is mounted on what we think is a large block of chestnut, which is soaked in oil! A little history of this engine: I bought it from my great uncle, Homer Blair, who worked at the Whitco/Sonneborn refinery in Petrolia. He also pulled wells and worked on them on the side. He and all of my uncles out there have pumped or pulled wells over the years. Homer had the engine for probably 25 years or so. I wasn't sure who he bought it from, but I was able to piece some things together. While traveling on Kaylor Road going out of Petrolia, my Uncle Frank, pointed out to me a lane off to the right where they went to get the engine with Homer. He said it wasn't too far back there, and it was belted up to a band wheel on one side, and I believe a generator on the other, that is why there are two clutches on this one. I made a mental note of this lane off of Kaylor Road, and upon returning home to the internet, I found some neat things out. When I looked at a map of the Foxburg Quadrangle (which Petrolia is in)that shows oil and gas wells, and owners names, I was surprised. I found the lane off of Kaylor Road, called Emery lane that the Berry was on. The property is shown a being owned by J. Barry, and across Kaylor Road is property owned by Prior Barry. I am thinking it is supposed to be Berry instead of Barry, being that there is a relative to the Berry's named Prior Berry, and J. Barry(Berry) is maybe John Peter Berry who designed the engine? Maybe this is a long shot, but I found it very interesting. It would be very neat to verify this somehow. Possibly someone on this site knows more. I was also told the Berry shop was along that road too. The Foxburg Quadrangle map is found online by typing it into a search like Google. The results come up from a website called Historic Mapworks, and this particular set of records is from 1961. Sorry for going on and on about this, just wanted to share what I have learned if any are interested. The first pic shows the engine out at the farm, and the other 2 are here at home in the polebarn. I will keep updates on progress. Thank you for looking! Best Regards, Sam
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	untitled (18).jpg
Views:	66
Size:	109.3 KB
ID:	312879   Click image for larger version

Name:	untitled (17).jpg
Views:	66
Size:	57.8 KB
ID:	312880   Click image for larger version

Name:	untitled (19).jpg
Views:	61
Size:	41.7 KB
ID:	312881  
Reply With Quote
The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to SamC For This Post:
Sponsored Links
  #22  
Old 06-23-2018, 08:04:57 AM
Peter Holmander Peter Holmander is offline
Subscriber
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: West Greenwich, Rhode Island
Posts: 444
Thanks: 808
Thanked 368 Times in 165 Posts
Default Re: JP Berry Engines

I just got done reading about how you acquired you engine Sam. Thanks for sharing and it's neat that it has a family history. Look forward to hearing that you have it running.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 06-23-2018, 10:22:03 AM
SamC SamC is offline
Subscriber
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania, USA
Posts: 59
Thanks: 160
Thanked 91 Times in 25 Posts
Default Re: JP Berry Engines

Peter, thank you for reading all of that and your feedback. This engine does have connections to our family as several of my great uncles remember going there to help start the engine if they were in the area. I recall a relative of the Berry's posting about the engines in a thread sometime ago. I believe it was about engines that have very few known survivors. He said that at one time, in the Butler oilfields, the Berry engines were so numerous, they were thought to be second in usage only to the Evans engines. And also that there were many Berrys made before the name was included in the bedplate casting on the sides. So there must have been loads of them that have been scrapped. Just some extra ponderings. Thank you again, best regards, Sam
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to SamC For This Post:
  #24  
Old 06-24-2018, 08:17:59 AM
Peter Holmander Peter Holmander is offline
Subscriber
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: West Greenwich, Rhode Island
Posts: 444
Thanks: 808
Thanked 368 Times in 165 Posts
Default Re: JP Berry Engines

You are most welcome Sam !! I have always been interested in old hit and miss engines and antique construction equipment. Back in 2001 I decided I had to have an oilfield engine. I bought a 15 HP Reid from Paul Wright in Polk, PA. We loaded the engine in the pouring rain. My son in law helped me and we did not have any dry clothes with us so it was an uncomfortable ride back home to say the least. Every time we stopped for gas, people would approach the truck and admire the engine, ask questions about it. When I got back home, I immersed myself in all I could read about the history of pumping oil in PA. I grew to have a tremendous respect for all who were involved in it. I still have the engine and it is one I will never part with. Will probably leave it to one of my grandchildren. When I speak of Reid engines among other collectors, some scoff and say things like "Oh, those are so common" or "There was a guy selling a bunch of those really cheap" Most don't realize that many of those oilfield engines ran 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, for years on end. Only stopping them to fill the oilers and do a quick inspection. Many of the oilfield engines had this same track record. Its sad to see any of them scrapped with the rich history they all possess. When I visit Coolspring with my wife, I am in awe of some of those rare engines they have there. Their designs are a work of art. But I always manage to stop and see that COMMON Reid they have cabled up to the pumping power set up to display how they pumped oil. I enjoy reading about those who care to preserve oilfield engines and the adventures involved in locating them and saving them. I'm glad you are doing this with yours. I keep saying I'm going to do it, but your story gave me the incentive to try and find out more about the history of ownership of my engine. I've read where the sales records for the Joseph Reid Gas Engine Co. were saved. I believe the ownership records can be searched through the Drake Well Museum. Look forward to hearing that you finally have the Berry running again after all these years.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 06-24-2018, 11:20:31 AM
SamC SamC is offline
Subscriber
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania, USA
Posts: 59
Thanks: 160
Thanked 91 Times in 25 Posts
Default Re: JP Berry Engines

Peter, I couldn't agree with you more! It is the history behind these engines that is one of the most interesting parts of fixing them up. I enjoy the research end of things as well. What we all have with our engines is living history! Besides, after all of the years they have worked to provide for their owners, they deserve to be saved if possible. It has been compelling to put the pieces together because of so many tales being told about this particular engine. I am very glad that all of my rambling on about this has you looking deeper into your engine's past. I have heard the records and resources at the Drake Well Museum are an excellent resource for many things oil. Even records about drilling activity in most of the Butler oilfields. I wasn't aware that they have records from the Reid Company. Very Cool! I wish you much success in finding everything you need to put the history of your Reid together! Thank you again, Sam
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

F o r u m Jump

Similar Threads Chosen at Random
Thread Thread Starter F o r u m Replies Last Post
Good Engines and Bad Engines Mark Thompson Steam Stationary Engines, Traction Engines, Steam Boats 75 11-27-2009 08:45:32 PM
Henry Berry & Co - stationary motor wjt Antique Gas Engine Discussion 10 07-15-2008 06:43:32 PM


Use "Ctrl" mouse wheel to change screen size.
All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:20:25 PM.

Smokstak and Enginads site search!


All use is subject to our TERMS OF SERVICE
SMOKSTAK® is a Registered Trade Mark - A Community of Antique Engine Enthusiasts
Copyright © 2000 - 2016 by Harry Matthews P.O. Box 5612 - Sarasota, FL 34277