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Old Dynamo


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  #1  
Old 03-28-2006, 03:53:05 PM
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Marcel P Marcel P is offline
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Default Old Dynamo

Hi all

Here are some pictures of a 1887 dynamo that I'm going to restore. Looks like I am missing the brush holder, any clues on how this might look?

Best regards
Marcel
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  #2  
Old 04-15-2006, 12:40:46 AM
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Default Re: old dynamo

If you can identify the maker, no doubt the science museums or patent offices in Europe would be the best sources of info.
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  #3  
Old 03-04-2013, 02:01:13 PM
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Marcel P Marcel P is offline
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Default Re: old dynamo

Due to several circumstances it took us a little longer to start work on this generator but things are looking good at the moment! We were lucky enough to find the brush holder and apart from a few bits n pieces that are easily reproducable it is complete now. Here are a few pics, more of the story later! One question for now (I don't know the answer): what would have been the reason that the bearings are water cooled?

Marcel
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  #4  
Old 03-04-2013, 07:02:03 PM
Daverepair Daverepair is offline
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Default Re: old dynamo

A lot of heat created to make electricity. I don't see a fan and at the speed that probably needs to turn, slow I imagine by todays standards, a fan would not do much. Many power plant generator of today have liquid cooling of the generator end.
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Old 03-04-2013, 08:18:31 PM
moteurdelco moteurdelco is offline
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Default Re: old dynamo

Marcel,comment ces coussinets sont-ils lubrifiés?? huile ou graisse?
belle collection de ''vieilleries''!
C'était peut-être une dynamo expérimentale.
Normand
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Old 03-04-2013, 08:20:02 PM
Geist Geist is offline
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Default Re: old dynamo

Quote:
Originally Posted by moteurdelco View Post
Marcel,comment ces coussinets sont-ils lubrifiés?? huile ou graisse?
belle collection de ''vieilleries''!
C'était peut-être une dynamo expérimentale.
Normand
??????????
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Old 03-04-2013, 08:43:05 PM
RETCPO RETCPO is offline
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Default Re: old dynamo

online translation http://translation2.paralink.com/

=
Marcel, how are these cushions lubricated?? oil or grease?
nice collection of "old things"!
It was perhaps one dynamo experimental.
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Old 03-04-2013, 09:32:44 PM
Daverepair Daverepair is offline
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Default Re: old dynamo

Easy for you to say
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Old 03-05-2013, 03:08:49 AM
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Default Re: old dynamo

You mean heat created by the electricity generated in the rotor? The bearings are lubricated by a simple drip oiler. It has babbitt bearings. The engine runs at a speed of maximum 150 rpm (don't know exactly what speed) and the ratio is about 1:6, for a dynamo built in 1887 that is quite a speed I think. It was not experimental but installed in a theatre room to make light.

Marcel
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Old 03-05-2013, 05:18:33 AM
Trevor A Cole Trevor A Cole is offline
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Default Re: old dynamo

Can you show more clearly the water cooled parts please? What is the extent of the water cooled areas? I notice the armature has reinforcement to keep the windings from being thrown outwards so about 900 RPM would not be out of the way. What I can't see clearly is the windings in the area of the commutator to the laminations? Having adjustable brush timing suggests it is designed for a fixed load and has no external voltage control or it is connected to a battery bank via a cutout. Thanks for posting.
The Trev
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Old 03-05-2013, 09:41:14 AM
Jim Rankin Jim Rankin is offline
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Default Re: old dynamo

With a solid cast iron frame, I expect there is quite a bit of eddy current loss in the machine resulting in heat buildup. Seems like the casting might be hollow up in the "jaws" of the frame, but maybe not.
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Old 03-05-2013, 04:52:31 PM
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Default Re: old dynamo

Here are some better pictures of the bearings. The cooling surrounds the babbits, there are 4 possible inlets on the sides and 2 possible outlets at the top, one of each to be connected. We had it running as a motor last Sunday. First we put a light current on the windings, that resulted immediately in a magnetic field. Then we connected the same source to the brushes and it started running! I have started to fabricate the missing pieces so it can be installed with the engine on a common frame.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PxY-Gsj2XY4

Marcel
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  #13  
Old 03-05-2013, 05:50:44 PM
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Default Re: old dynamo

watercooled bushings..... no experience ,just an engineering guess.... my first guess is the bearings had a high radial load (belt) on them and spun relatively fast , maybe poor quality finish, making heat.

2nd guess is the relatively large diameter shaft could conduct heat out of the comutator or windings. Just a guess that metal brushes on metal comutator sparked alot (hot) and I see some discoloration on tips of metal brushes.
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Old 03-05-2013, 11:34:14 PM
Radiomike Radiomike is offline
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Default Re: old dynamo

what an interesting find. And to find. with some work. it would still run.

From the photos the brush lead or lag is not clear, but from the information it seems it would be clockwise looking at the commutator end; at least from the brush angle. A motor will have a negative lead a dynamo a positive lead. But if being used a voltmeter can be used to determine the neutral axis at any load. This will vary with load and motor or dynamo function. The brushes look to be copper, these I expect would spark more as there is no resistance to suppress the reactance voltages during commutation, especially during load changes. Obviously at a fixed load the brush lag or lead can be set to improve commutation. In later motors compoles, (interpoles) and pole face windings are used to assist commutation, by minimising the effects of armature reaction. I would not expect the pole pieces on such an early machine to be laminated as the eddy current losses are small with DC or close to DC currents.

The commutator appears not to have any patina on, this will come with some running and a little cleaning.

Is there any data on this machine at all? The commutator appears large so could it have been used for electrolysis, i.e. large currents low volts and a steady load?

The bearings look as if they are grease lubricated, so the cooling effect of oil circulation is not present. Water cooling must thus do the job.

Mike
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Old 03-06-2013, 06:36:42 PM
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Default Re: old dynamo

It was used to power the lights of a theatre room. Lubrication is done by drip oilers, you can see the oiler minus its glass in one of the pictures. The brushes are made out of laminated copper mesh, I'll have to make one as there are only 3. I also think the cooling has something to do with the rotation speed, 900 rpm was quite a speed almost 130 years ago! We will find out soon if they really need cooling. Judging by the wires it was indeed low voltage (I thinks 55 volts) and high current.

Marcel
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