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Operating a Vulcan Iron Works 0-4-0T Steam Locomotive


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  #1  
Old 04-19-2014, 06:33:33 PM
cyberbadger cyberbadger is offline
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Default Operating a Vulcan Iron Works 0-4-0T Steam Locomotive



Published on Apr 19, 2014 by youtube user Keith Rucker
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Come along for a cab ride in the Georgia Museum of Agriculture's 1917 Vulcan Iron Works 0-4-0T Steam Locomotive! We will go through the process of firing the locomotive as well as tell you the history of this operational narrow gauge steam locomotive.
-CB
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Old 04-21-2014, 09:23:14 PM
Dave Richards Dave Richards is offline
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Default Re: Operating a Vulcan Iron Works 0-4-0T Steam Locomotive

Do not miss this museum in Southern GA if you are down that way. The steam loco runs on Saturdays only, but during the week EVERYTHING ELSE runs. Printing press, water powered grist mill, turpentine still, blacksmith, cooper, sugar cain operation, steam powered saw mill, etc. The village buildings communicate by a very early hand crank phone system with switchboard in the print shop. Crops are put in by mule power. Very impressive but little known place.

Dave Richards
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Old 04-21-2014, 10:30:48 PM
cyberbadger cyberbadger is offline
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Default Re: Operating a Vulcan Iron Works 0-4-0T Steam Locomotive

Also their sawmill that has not been running for 5 years just got a new beautiful replacement boiler (Frick) they got in the last month or so from Jonas Stutzman.

They use the Frick boiler to run a stationary horizontal Atlas 25hp Steam Engine to run their sawmill.

-CB
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Old 04-21-2014, 11:03:58 PM
Mark L. Jordan Mark L. Jordan is offline
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Default Re: Operating a Vulcan Iron Works 0-4-0T Steam Locomotive

This is a nice video, and I'd like to see the musuem someday. The engine is nice, but I can't help notice something with my inspector eyes that concerns me.

Who can tell me what I'm worried about?

HINT: It is located in the cab, and screams "Gettysburg Incident".

I know that this engine is not FRA compliant, and does not need to be.

I'm posting this so that everyone can learn, not to be critical of their operation.
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Old 04-22-2014, 12:23:24 AM
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16GaarScott 16GaarScott is offline
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Default Re: Operating a Vulcan Iron Works 0-4-0T Steam Locomotive


Who can tell me what I'm worried about?



for one the water glass doesn't have it's own light, is my guess. Or something else to do with the water glass.
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Old 04-22-2014, 12:30:22 AM
cyberbadger cyberbadger is offline
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Default Re: Operating a Vulcan Iron Works 0-4-0T Steam Locomotive

Too many bends on the piping to the cab sight glass.

-CB
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Old 04-22-2014, 01:22:43 AM
Mark L. Jordan Mark L. Jordan is offline
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Default Re: Operating a Vulcan Iron Works 0-4-0T Steam Locomotive

It is related to the water glass, but so far nobody has seen it.
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Old 04-22-2014, 01:58:46 AM
cyberbadger cyberbadger is offline
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Default Re: Operating a Vulcan Iron Works 0-4-0T Steam Locomotive

No isolation valves to drain and prove the sight glass?

-CB

---------- Post added at 01:58 AM ---------- Previous post was at 01:47 AM ----------

Mark,

Don't have a sight glass connected to any other steam "appliances" on a boiler including engines/injectors/pumps etc.

-CB
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Old 04-22-2014, 05:04:47 PM
Mark L. Jordan Mark L. Jordan is offline
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Default Re: Operating a Vulcan Iron Works 0-4-0T Steam Locomotive

What I'm referring to can be seen if you stop the video at 1:16.

In 1995 there was a crown sheet failure resulting from low water involving a locomotive operated by the Gettysburg RR. This is the "Medina" equivalent in the locomotive world. The official report is here:
http://www.ntsb.gov/doclib/safetystudies/sir9605.pdf

This low water condition was the result of several operating and maintenance deficiencies, but mainly due to a plugged up water glass connection between the water glass/water column and boiler.

All boiler designs, including locomotives and traction engines, must have suitable provisions for inspecting the piping that connects the water glass to the boiler, so that any reduction in opening or "plugging up" will be seen and removed. If the water glass does not communicate at all times with the boiler, it will give a false reading.

On this locomotive, there are elbows and tees that connect the bottom of the water glass to the boiler. These should be replaced with "crosses" so that the operator, maintainer, and inspector can open the plugs in the unused ends of the crosses and see through the piping, insuring that it is free and clear. This is a normal point of inspection that any boiler inspector is required to do for all boilers. Additionally, the stop valve should not be a globe valve, as a globe valve cannot be seen through and has the tendency to provide a place for sediment to accumulate.

Water glass and water column valves are normally angle valves that can have their spindles removed for inspection of the piping internally. If an angle valve with removable spindle is not used, a gate or ball valve may be a better choice than a globe valve.

I don't know who inspects this locomotive or if it is inspected at all, but this is a basic violation that is a safety concern because the way it is currently piped, there is no way to KNOW if the water glass is not plugged up. When taking charge of the locomotive, the crew should always conduct a water glass test, including properly blowing it down. Even this test will not show if the piping is becoming fouled, it will show that it isn't fouled YET.

I look forward to seeing this museum some day!
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Old 04-23-2014, 02:30:30 AM
cyberbadger cyberbadger is offline
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Default Re: Operating a Vulcan Iron Works 0-4-0T Steam Locomotive

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark L. Jordan View Post
In 1995 there was a crown sheet failure resulting from low water involving a locomotive operated by the Gettysburg RR. This is the "Medina" equivalent in the locomotive world.
Mark,

I have downloaded and will read that report of the accident.

I really appreciate your Inspector's unofficial assessment.

I really really feel it's much safer for the hobbyist/historical steam community to share things and post videos then to close up and try to hide things.

Keith Rucker's machining videos are excellent and a credit to the Georgia Museum of Agriculture.

Someone (Mark?) should contact them and alert them of this deficiency.

-CB
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Old 04-23-2014, 04:31:57 PM
Fred Cooper Fred Cooper is offline
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Default Re: Operating a Vulcan Iron Works 0-4-0T Steam Locomotive

Hi All,
Each year on the dry inspection our inspector insists we remove the plugs from the water gauge fittings so he can poke a rod through to the boiler. He also insists on blowing down both glasses on the steam test.
Regards and safe steaming,
Fred
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