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Oil Field Engines & Related Equipment

Tillinghast Regulator size?


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  #1  
Old 08-19-2019, 05:20:02 PM
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Kirbster Kirbster is offline
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Default Tillinghast Regulator size?

I have searched for help on getting a regulator size, many have said RV regulator would work, or a BBQ grill regulator would work, some say I need an accumulator some say it should be 4 to 6WC some say it should be 11 WC.

For as simple as these engines are this is a pretty complex question to be answered.

I tried starting my Tillinghast this past weekend and many have told me it is not getting enough gas to the cylinder. I am using the regulator that I found on the engine when I bought it, assuming that regulator works, and it seemed to, I think.

I run one tank to my hot tube and the tube gets nice and hot and then a regulated tank to my accumulator then diamond valve.

Just looking for some advice and some pointers on what to look for in a regulator. My engine is a 15 or 20 hp BD Tillinghast on a South Penn bed.

Thank you in advance for any help!

Kirbster
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Old 08-19-2019, 08:49:35 PM
con-rad con-rad is offline
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Default Re: Tillinghast Regulator size?

pressure should be 11"WC. I have seen engines running fine without accumulators, but I make accumulators for all of my engines because I want to plumb them once and not worry about reworking it due to fuel starvation.

Any regulator should work for an engine that size, but I prefer to buy slightly higher output and higher quality regulators just as insurance. I ran my 15hp Pattin on a bbq regulator for a while until it started giving me issues because I accidentally installed it with the vent upwards, and it swallowed dust, water, etc over time and failed. I replaced it with a nicer Marshall with the vent DOWN and it works fine!

connor
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Old 08-20-2019, 11:23:42 PM
dkamp dkamp is offline
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Default Re: Tillinghast Regulator size?

The regulator and tank combination frequently work for some, and are as frequently a constant source of consternation for others.

BBQ grille applications are equipped with safety mechanisms that oftentimes are not compatible with the demands of an antique engine, and the accumulator can compound the problem.

The Overfill Protection Device, and the Excess Flow Valve will frequently cause fuel cutoff because they were designed for a basically surge-free fueling application, and (while rated rather high) not a particularly high flow.

Compound this by the fact that the common BBQ tank is small, and unable to evaporate liquid propane into gaseous state without adding substantial quantites of heat to the tank, and you have a lousy running, very unstable and unpredictable engine.

The 'diamond valve' is basically an unregulated adjustment... unless there's some sort of demand controller, that setup is really just a wellhead-gas type setup, and it's not a wise idea to run propane on it, because it doesn't actually 'meter' fuel... it's the equivalent of putting a 500-gallon gasoline barrel over a lawnmower's air intake, and letting the tank drip into the intake... when the engine stops, you've got a hazard, and when the engine changes load, it doesn't change mixture. In an oilfield application, the action of pumping oil forces wellhead gases to the engine, and the more it pumped, the more wellhead gas was available to the engine, so by nature it had it's own regulatory feedback loop... and if the engine stopped, the pump stopped, so the flow went to near nothing... there wasn't such a high concern of natural gas running free (it naturally does in oil country... right up through the soil at times...)

I can guarantee you that one could make a 20hp engine RUN, but it won't run at any substantial load, for any substantial time, on a small tank before the tank temperature falls so far that it won't be able to keep up gaseous capacity for engine demand.

The OPD and excess flow valve features will 'lock off' fuel as a result of rapid flow, even for the short term that the regulator is charging the accumulator, or the time when the engine has a good strong surge on the throttle for a couple strokes.

The best combination for gaseous for a 20hp engine, is a 125lb tank, with regulator size, would be at least 1,000,000 BTU, 10psi first stage, followed by at least a 700,000btu second stage, then the demand regulator. If you don't already have one, the Garretson KN. Standard orfice will do, but I recommend a 1/2" orfice if you're actually planning on working it.
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Old 08-21-2019, 08:06:04 PM
con-rad con-rad is offline
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Default Re: Tillinghast Regulator size?

I've run my 15 hp Pattin on a 20Lb tank. It's not the best idea because you'll drain the tank fast, but it's doable if it's all you have at the moment. That being said, having a 30"WC pressure gauge teed in will help you diagnose any issues that you might have.

Also, I don't know if there's a difference, but the regulator i had on that engine might have been an RV regulator, not a BBQ regulator. Not sure if they have the same fuel shutoff safeties.

connor
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Old 09-10-2019, 10:47:01 PM
IronworkerFXR IronworkerFXR is offline
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Default Re: Tillinghast Regulator size?

And I hear people run 15 hp engines all day on a 20# tank,,,
the OPD device I can see as being an issue, and I am sure these engines are run slow and not under a load.

hope to have my Reid 15 up and running soon , then I can tell you if the 20# works or do I use my forklift tank ......
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Old 09-12-2019, 05:45:50 AM
Dirk Hochstetler Dirk Hochstetler is offline
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Default Re: Tillinghast Regulator size?

I use a 20 to run my engine at shows,a couple hours got to shut it off and let the ice melt off the tank,then start it up. 🥓🥓
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