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Steam Stationary Engines, Traction Engines, Steam Boats Antique steam engines, their boilers, pumps, gauges, whistles and other related things that make them run.

Steam Stationary Engines, Traction Engines, Steam Boats

Guest Engineering


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  #1  
Old 11-17-2006, 05:56:35 PM
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AndyG AndyG is offline
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This topic has come up on the "Eder" thread and now the "Judgement" thread. What questions do you ask whe getting on an engine that you are not familiar with? Each machine has its quirks that are important to know. For example: On my Huber, if there is water in the glass you are safe from and exposion but you need to carry about 2/3 of a glass to keep the tubes covered (on my return flue boiler some of the tubes are higher than the top of the fire flue).
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Old 11-17-2006, 07:00:51 PM
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Default Re: Guest Engineering

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Originally Posted by AndyG View Post
This topic has come up on the "Eder" thread and now the "Judgement" thread. What questions do you ask whe getting on an engine that you are not familiar with?
1. Talk with the owner/man in charge. He can tell you about things to watch for, and where he wants the water level kept at.

2. Check the water level. This doesn't mean just looking at the glass, but rather opening the drain cock to see that the glass empties and then refills to its previous level.

3. Get on the engine and try out the injectors to make sure they are working. On Eder's Z3, the injectors had a globe valve plumbed into the injector delivery tail pipe, right next to the brass union nut, something I've never seen before. A little detail that was unique to my experience, and one that I didn't need to puzzle out if the boiler required water in a hurry.

4. Warm the engine up with all drain cocks open, with the engine out of gear.

5. And just as important, I thank the owner/man in charge and ask if there is anything else I can do to help after I've had the privilege of running his engine.

David
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Old 11-21-2006, 01:32:13 PM
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Default Re: Guest Engineering

Thanks David, These are some good tips.
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Old 11-21-2006, 08:58:41 PM
Pete Deets Pete Deets is offline
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Default Re: Guest Engineering

The first three things to know about ANY steam engine (boiler) is:
1) Where's the water
2) Where's the water
3) Where's the water

I also agree to then ask the owner/caretaker where they want to see the water run. You may then ask where that is in relation to the crown/ top tubes.

Other questions I've asked include what pressure they prefer to carry. Just because the pop is set for 135 psi doesn't mean it has to be run at 134 all the time.

I'll also ask what are the preferred lubricants for which part of the engine; how often is which needed; when was it last done; do any oilers need to be turned on or off and when.

I also like to know if there are tools/spare parts on the engine.

Is it OK for just a ride around or may it be worked a bit (sawmill/seperator)?

Expressing appreciation of someone's generosity in letting you run their baby is also key.

I only have a Wilesco steam roller and a G scale live steam locomotive so all my operating time has been as a guest of others. For that I say thank you to all who have shared their platform with the less fortunate.....PD
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