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BIG engine foundations


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  #1  
Old 02-03-2005, 03:51:07 PM
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AndyG AndyG is offline
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Question BIG engine foundations

I don't know much about stationary engines but I enjoy reading about them here. My club owns a large engine that needs to be set on a permanent foundation. I don't know how to design a foundation suitable for the task and I need some help. The engine is a 100hp Venn-Sevren diesel. This engine is a vertical 2 -cylinder, 2-stroke. I understand that the engine weighs 9,000 lb, flywheel 3,000 lb and its belted to a generator weighing 3,000 lb = total 15,000lb. The weight isn't going to be hard to support but dynamic loading is significant. This engine, being a 2-stroke and only 2 cylinder, really thumps when it runs. We need a foundation that can take the pounding and keep the engine from jumping out of the building. Help me get started on this project. BTW this engine is owned by the SIAM club in Evansville, IN.
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Old 02-03-2005, 04:13:50 PM
Chris Curtis
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Default Re: BIG engine foundations

The company I work for installs a lot of foundations for punch presses in factories. This amounts to digging a pit in the factory floor and filling them up with steel reinforced concrete with built in anchor bolts. The foundation is more of a counterweight to hold the press down more than it is a foundation to hold it up. Some of these large presses have concrete foundations that are more than 10 feet thick. You may have similer situation with this engine wanting to bounce around. I would contact a local commercial contractor or engineer to figure out just what you need and have it done right. Trying to "wing it" with something this big could have catastophic results.
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Old 02-03-2005, 05:02:51 PM
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Default Re: BIG engine foundations

Many times original literature details how to prepare a foundation for such an engine. So much for guesswork. SOMEONE should have info on this and I'm sure they will respond.
Craig
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Old 02-03-2005, 10:53:52 PM
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Default Re: BIG engine foundations

Quote:
Originally Posted by andyg
We need a foundation that can take the pounding and keep the engine from jumping out of the building. Help me get started on this project.
Hi Andy,
Audel's Millwrights & Mechanics Guide has about 22 pages on the subject.

I've copied the five pages that most address your issue. Make sure you have Acrobat or Acrobat Reader 6.0 or later, and get the file from

http://literature.rustyiron.com/foundation.pdf

Rob
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Old 02-03-2005, 11:23:47 PM
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Default Re: BIG engine foundations

Andy,


I have a similar design problem in installing my 17 HP Ruston diesel in a power plant that I'm building. I have a 1942 text "Power Plant Engineering." In it, they recommend a total foundation weight for multi-cylinder diesel engines of 1250 pounds per bhp. (It recommends 2000 pounds per BHP for single cylinder engines, like mine)

Marks' handbook (16 ed.) specifies 7.7 - 8.8 cu ft per bhp for vertical "gas" engines.

My gut feeling is that both these guidelines are conservative, expecially in my case, as I have no intention of operating the plant on a continuous, or even daily basis.
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Old 02-04-2005, 03:04:04 PM
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Smile Re: BIG engine foundations

Thanks for the help so far folks. You have already bee a big help. I will appreciate more info if anyone has it.
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Old 02-04-2005, 04:04:27 PM
Leonard Keifer Leonard Keifer is offline
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Default Re: BIG engine foundations

You might try to contact someone at Rough and Tumble in Kinzers, PA. They have a number of large engines mounted on concrete foundations. Someone there may have some insights for you.
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