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Antique Gas Engine Discussion

Type of Grease in Grease cups


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  #1  
Old 04-11-2005, 12:23:27 PM
Dale S Dale S is offline
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Question Type of Grease in Grease cups

What type of grease do you guys use in grease cups? connecting rod cup and crank shaft cups.
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Old 04-11-2005, 03:04:34 PM
Ken Adamson Ken Adamson is offline
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Default Re: Type of Grease in Grease cups

Dale,
Wish someone would answer your question. I have been putting wheel bearing grease in mine, but I don’t know what is the best in an old engine. Just kinda figured that if wheel bearings never wear out if well greased with good wheel bearing grease then it should work on the old engine bearings.
Ken
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Old 04-11-2005, 06:01:58 PM
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George & Helen Myers George & Helen Myers is offline
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Default Re: Type of Grease in Grease cups

Hey fellas!

Many of these questions have been answered before. If you are itching for an answer try searching the archives.

Try this for an answer:
http://www.smokstak.com/forum/showth...bearing+grease

You may have to copy & paste the address.

There is a lot of knowledge in the archives.

Helen
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Old 04-11-2005, 10:30:17 PM
Gasengn Gasengn is offline
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Default Re: Type of Grease in Grease cups

I've always used whatever general purpose grease that was in my grease gun at the time. They all worked fine with no trouble for the last 33 years.
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Old 04-11-2005, 11:49:49 PM
Andrew Mackey Andrew Mackey is offline
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Exclamation Re: Type of Grease in Grease cups

Try to find a heavy parafin or oil based grease. Most of the new Hi Temp disc brake bearing greases are soap based. This is not compatable with other greases or oils. I have been told Marfak #3 bearing grease is good - supposedly used in truck bearings.
Andrew
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Old 04-12-2005, 12:05:20 AM
Simple_serf Simple_serf is offline
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Default Re: Type of Grease in Grease cups

I use plain old White lithium grease. I know it isn't the greatest to use, But none of my H&M engines do any work. It is easy to clean up and will not ruin the paint, like some soap based wheel bearing grease will.

The simple serf
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Old 04-12-2005, 11:13:18 PM
BillsToys BillsToys is offline
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Default Re: Type of Grease in Grease cups

I'm a chemist and I'm with Andrew on the type of grease to use in old equipment. The newer soap based grease is designed to be used in nearly sealed areas and in areas where there is nearly daily use. They will take up water easily. Grease cups are more exposed. If your engines are stored in out buildings and subject to rainy day humidity and not run for months then use the Parafin /oil based greases. But any grease is better than no grease. Also, Lithium grease is a soap based grease. It is in wide use for some of the wrong areas. Remember the car people want you to buy a new set of wheel every 5 to 10 years.
Bill in Ohio
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Old 04-13-2005, 07:42:41 AM
William William is offline
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Default Re: Type of Grease in Grease cups

How do you know if the grease is soap baised or Parafin /oil based greases?

The greases I have looked at doesn't say on the container.

Thanks,
William
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Old 04-13-2005, 12:10:50 PM
Martin Reed Martin Reed is offline
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Default Re: Type of Grease in Grease cups

Common greases are made of two parts: the lubricating oil and the soap that holds the oil in suspension. There are several different soaps that have been developed over the years to work in various extreme environments such as high temperature, high humidity, space, low temperature, low torque, etc. There is no better overall grease for our engines than the Lithium or Lithium Complex soap greases you can buy at the parts store. The Lithium soap based greases keep good consistency when worked, operate between -20°F-180°F continuously and have good moisture compatibility. You could get fancy and get a Lithium based grease with synthetic oil but it would be a waste of money. I work for a company that makes large bearings that are greased with Lithium greases and run and run underneath railcars for 10-30 years with no issues. The best way to get good bearing life is to not overload the engine, maintain good bearing clearance and keep the bearings well lubricated.
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Old 04-13-2005, 05:47:40 PM
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Default Re: Type of Grease in Grease cups

The grease available today is completely different than 70 or 80 years ago. Years ago, grease was more clay based but because of tolerances and much higher speeds, greases today are not that way. I use wheel bearing grease which I push by hand into a gun with an old tube in it. It's really sticky!
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Old 04-13-2005, 10:48:59 PM
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Default Re: Type of Grease in Grease cups

It is much more important to remember to use grease, than what kind of grease is used. I wouldn't worry about the "kind" of grease to used on our old engines. One thing to watch is to not mix greases with different bases.
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Old 04-13-2005, 11:46:43 PM
Andrew Mackey Andrew Mackey is offline
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Exclamation Re: Type of Grease in Grease cups

Lithium grease may be OK for plain bearings, but I would not use it on a 2 cycle engine with a closed crankcase, like the Fairmont Railway engines or the Middleditch designed engines (early T&M, Detroit Engine Works[Marine & Stationary], Sandow, Bessemer, and others of the period). Exposure to hydrocarbon fuels (Gasoline, Kerosene, Etc., will quickly degrade the lithium grease.
Andrew
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Old 04-14-2005, 04:09:05 PM
BobRR BobRR is online now
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Default Re: Type of Grease in Grease cups

Does anyone still make cup grease?A friends Dad has whats left of a old drum of what he calls cupgrease we use on our engines. Its a light yellow color.BobRR
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Old 04-14-2005, 05:11:44 PM
CharlieBiler CharlieBiler is offline
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Default Re: Type of Grease in Grease cups

Now for two more cents worth of confusion. I would use a #2 lithium complex EP grease. One of the best is the old Kendall L-427 Super Blue grease. It is made for continous use to around 350 degrees. I like it because it will not seperate, or melt, at temperatures around 500 degrees, and it will still not break down. It also has a special 'tackiness' additive for use on things like distributor cams and truck fifth wheel applications. It will really stick on reciprocating applications. It will also stick to you like snot. Gasoline barely touches it when it comes to getting it off your hands. It is not affected by pressure washes and hydrocarbon gases have no effect. It is great for wet areas like water pump bearings and felt sealed applications.

The old long fibered grease is okay for rotating applications and cool temperatures. It will not stand reciprocation and it is best to use as a present to any friendly Amish folk. Since it is no longer available to use in buggy axles, they think it is the cat's meow. Many of them are slowly starting to realize that a tacky grease with smooth viscosity is superior to the stringy stiff stuff. They just carve a fifty percent "X" channel on the slack side of solid bearings and the softer #2 grease will keep going to where it is needed. The old fiber stuff just hung around on the perimeter while the dry core was being eaten away by friction.

My father disagrees with me. He prefers a #2 calcium sulfonate grease. It is sold as SHP grease. It has a slightly higher melt point and it is almost as tacky as my choice. It is still engineered to stick to open gears and fifth wheels. Unfortunately it tends to shake off under high reciprocating stress. It is considered the most water resistant grease on earth. The tradeoffs are that it is only good down to zero degrees farenheit and it is slightly less tacky.

See; even in the same family we disagree about grease. Pap was a mechanic for longer than I have been alive. Next year I will finally be older than his mechanic career was long. I will be 47 then. He tends to use my 427 grease on most things, except auto wheel bearings. I think he likes the fact that my 427 is generally here in those convinent 14 ounce grease gun tubes. I also think that he likes the fact that it is free. There is some kind of cosmic justice about payback, for not filling up his gas tank when I was a kid.

Time to slip slide away................................
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Old 04-14-2005, 05:30:58 PM
CharlieBiler CharlieBiler is offline
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Default Re: Type of Grease in Grease cups

I thought this thread was familiar. Everything old is new again. Just look up http://www.smokstak.com/forum/showth...ghlight=grease and be amused. I just love talking about grease. It makes me feel like a pig in fresh mud. The fellows that argue against soap based greases have a point too. Don't you just love a good fight.........................................
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Old 04-15-2005, 11:11:41 AM
HBurk HBurk is offline
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Default Re: Type of Grease in Grease cups

martin reed, your email isn't working. please send me a private message. thanks.
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Old 04-15-2005, 02:47:39 PM
David McAdams David McAdams is offline
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Smile Re: Type of Grease in Grease cups

I may be way off in left field on this subject and I am sure that most on this site have way more knowledge than I. That being said, here's my two cents worth. Back in the "old days", they had a grease for grease cups that was refered to as "Hard Grease" I have old manuals with the term used. My limited understanding of the subject, was that the hard grease melted at a lower temp than our modern grease's. It was desirable to have the grease melt and run down and around between the bearings and the shaft, acting some what like engine oil does in a vehicle's bearings. I know of no source for hard grease today, but would think a person is can use a modern grease and crank the grease cups down more often, thus pushing the grease into the bearing. I have had old timers tell me they would crank down the cups about three times a day if they were not working the engine to hard. That maybe fine with the old grease but I choose to crank them down much more frequent with the newer grease's. I also try to find a grease with a low melt point. Just my two cents worth!
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Old 04-16-2005, 01:12:06 AM
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Default Re: Type of Grease in Grease cups

So how about LUBRIPLATE ?
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