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making molds for casting parts


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  #1  
Old 07-11-2005, 12:24:48 AM
Neill Neill is offline
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Default making molds for casting parts

I was wondering if anyone knows how to make a mold for casting parts, that can be resused (not sand). Also what type of material should be used for this. Thanks for any help.
Neill
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Old 07-11-2005, 10:30:21 AM
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Elden DuRand Elden DuRand is offline
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Default Re: making molds for casting parts

Quote:
Originally Posted by neill
I was wondering if anyone knows how to make a mold for casting parts, that can be resused (not sand). Also what type of material should be used for this. Thanks for any help.
Neill
Neill:

Frank and I have an ongoing project to cast clones of the Aermotor magneto-type rocker arms and other parts. We are using a two-part rubber compound and have made one set of molds but they are not up to our standard. When I get the time, I'll post updates giving materials, etc.

I've put a page up that explains our ongoing project. Go to my webpage, click on the Aermotor project then find the button to the cloning.

My server is out of whack for a while due to hurricane Dennis (the menace) but should be back up shortly.

http://home.cybertron.com/~edurand

Take care - Elden
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Old 07-12-2005, 01:51:48 AM
Wm. Galloway Wm. Galloway is offline
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Default Re: making molds for casting parts

Know how to make a mold? Yes, there are varius techniques all dependent upon the accuarcy level and money you can afford to spend. In order of accuarcy / expense:
E.D.M die sinking using graphite plug
CNC milling
manual mill
cast to size
hand scraped / shaped
Type of material? It all depends on what type of cast parts you intend to produce. For aluminum / zinc you could use bronze, steel, iron. For lead you could use aluminum molds. Many molds are made of P-20 a type of tool steel. I doubt you would need that as it's main purpose is the level of polish attainable.
There are a few (very few) producers of ductile iron that permanent mold. They use iron molds. These places use temp. cooling lines in the mold. I suggest that an ameture not try this. Water and molten metal do not mix.
Why do you desire to produce castings without sand? Permanent molding has many difficulties associated with it that layman may not consider. If I can be of any help let me know.
"the foundryman"
Chris Witt
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Old 07-12-2005, 02:49:57 AM
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Ray Cardoza Ray Cardoza is offline
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Default Re: making molds for casting parts

Elden I'm having a problem getting to youre page and i cant figure out why .
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Old 07-12-2005, 09:04:04 AM
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Elden DuRand Elden DuRand is offline
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Exclamation Re: making molds for casting parts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ray Cardoza
Elden I'm having a problem getting to youre page and i cant figure out why .
Ray (and others):

I'm sorry you're having any luck with my page. I'm in the same quandry. I can't even get or send email out of there! I need to do some updating of my page but my ISP is down for I don't know how long because of hurricane Dennis (the menace).

I'll give 'em a couple more days to get their act together then I may have to start searching for another Florida server.

Take care - Elden

P.S.: If anyone needs to email me, use the following address (I'm on my Kentucky ISP for the next few days):
edurand@iglou.com
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Old 07-12-2005, 05:07:36 PM
Don C. Wiley Don C. Wiley is offline
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Default Re: making molds for casting parts

Elden;

That Model-750 Delco-Light generator on your web site is a bit unusual. They didn't use a 32 volt battery. When you wanted power you just turned the light on, the generator would start and provide you with 750 watts of 32 volt power until you turned the appliance off.

Be sure you have it firmly fastened down before starting it. They tend to do a LOT of jumping around. They were made to be fastened to a block of concrete about two foot square and about two foot tall. That makes it a bit hard to haul to a show.

We bolted ours to a piece of iron 3" thick and about two foot square. It still shook the trailer we had it on, so we used one of those strobe light wheel balancers and put a couple of pieces of lead in the lip of the flywheel. That took a lot of shake out of it.

"DELCO DON" Southern Illinois
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Old 07-12-2005, 09:00:04 PM
KidDynamo KidDynamo is offline
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Default Re: making molds for casting parts

I suppose there is more than one way to do this. The way I saw on the boob-tube recently involved making a "rubber" mold that was reuseable a number of times. Them rubber mold was derived from an original and it was used to cast wax forms that were then used to cast metal pieces using the "lost wax" casting process.

This was fairly involved, believe you me! I will leave it to you to research the process on your own but each step along the way involved a lot of hand work. I was thinking that sand casting parts one at a time in a cope and drag looked pretty easy by comparison. Heck- I did that in high school using aluminum. Yes, a new sand mold had to be boxed up for each part cast, but the casting form could be re-used many times provided it was a simple form requiring no core blocks.

In about 1994, I made several visits to the remaining company of Graymarine in Oskosh. They had totes full of casing molds for all kinds of their engine parts. Many of these forms (I don't know if I'm using the correct adjective here), for example a camshaft form, had built-in parting boards which probably simplified the molding process considerably.

Who am I kidding, I don't really know if they were sand casting from these forms !! I will say it was pitiful to see a once dominant engine firm reduced to a mere shadow of its former self. They still had a lot of parts on the shelf, though- mostly for 40's through 70's marine engines.
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Old 07-13-2005, 12:18:54 AM
Wm. Galloway Wm. Galloway is offline
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Default Re: making molds for casting parts

Kid,
Is that Graymarine still around Oshkosh. I sell alot of machined castings to a company in Oshkosh and get up there quite often.
What you probably saw were aluminum match plate patterns that have both sides of the pattern on the plate. It also has irregular parting line shapes to make parts with less cores. The matchplates could have been run on a manual "squeezer" or automatic molding machine.
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Old 07-13-2005, 11:52:40 AM
KidDynamo KidDynamo is offline
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Default Re: making molds for casting parts

I don't know what Graymarine's status is now. It was a pretty slow looking effort when I was there; most of the building they were in was being used as wholesale grocery warehousing.

The patterns I saw varied but if they were metal, they may have have been coated with some kind of plastic because they looked like a plastic material and were various colors that did not have the look of any type of metal coloring. I think I handled a few of them but I may be mistaken.

The fellow running the "office" sold me some engine owner's manuals for a GrayMarine Fireball VC-280 that I had in a pleasure boat, at that time. (This was a marinized Buick 401cu. in. "nailhead"). The atmosphere was friendly enough but looked like the whole thing could evaporate. We talked briefly about the company history and subsequent "downsizing" but no substantial information was revealed.

A few years later, the folks I sold my boat to told me that the phone number had changed- not the sign of a strong business effort. I had steered a few Seattle boat owners in their direction, knowing that they still had original marine engine gaskets sets for some of thier "extinct" engine models.

At the time I visited, I was in Beloit for a couple of weeks, attending an overhaul school for the Fairbanks O.P. and obtained Graymarine's phone number from directory assistance. If I was ever in the area again, I would make another visit, but that isn't likely.

While cooling my heel at night, I was reading a local want ad paper and called on an ad for "farm engines". Although the ad was fresh, all the engines had been sold by the time I arrived, except the marine engines which were being kept. The deceased collectors son said that he was keeping them for the time being, as they had been his Dad's real interest. There were more intact, freshwater-run old marine engines in that outbuilding alone than probably exist in all of Seattle !!

The fellow said to call him "in a few years" and maybe he would part with an engine or two, but I soon lost track of the number. It was fun just knowing that stuff like that was still around!!
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Old 07-14-2005, 01:40:26 PM
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Elden DuRand Elden DuRand is offline
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Photo Re: making molds for casting parts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Don C. Wiley
Elden;

That Model-750 Delco-Light generator on your web site is a bit unusual. They didn't use a 32 volt battery. When you wanted power you just turned the light on, the generator would start and provide you with 750 watts of 32 volt power until you turned the appliance off.

Be sure you have it firmly fastened down before starting it. They tend to do a LOT of jumping around. They were made to be fastened to a block of concrete about two foot square and about two foot tall. That makes it a bit hard to haul to a show.

We bolted ours to a piece of iron 3" thick and about two foot square. It still shook the trailer we had it on, so we used one of those strobe light wheel balancers and put a couple of pieces of lead in the lip of the flywheel. That took a lot of shake out of it.

"DELCO DON" Southern Illinois
Don:

Nice to hear from you! I'll keep the seismic qualitits of the Delco in mind when I first start it.

When we got this engine, the governor linkage was messed-up so I've attached a picture of how I "think" the governor/throttle linkage goes.

But I've got questions:
- Is there a torsion spring that attaches to an 8-32 screw that's threaded into the carb above the throttle shaft to act as a return?
- Also, as shown, at one end of travel, the weighted arm disengages from the slot in the arm coming up from the governor. Is this supposed to happen? If so, does a spring keep tension on this linkage?

Thanks for any light you can shed on this.

Take care - Elden
http://home.cybertron.com/~edurand
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Old 07-15-2005, 03:10:03 PM
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Elden DuRand Elden DuRand is offline
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Default Re: making molds for casting parts

Okey-dokey.........I finally found the photos I took of the Aermotor rocker arm cloning project back in June.

You can see our progress so far at:

http://home.cybertron.com/~edurand/A...%20Rocker.html

Have fun but take care - Elden
http://home.cybertron.com/~edurand
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Old 07-15-2005, 09:24:17 PM
Don C. Wiley Don C. Wiley is offline
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Default Re: making molds for casting parts

Elden;

Mine doesn't have a torsion spring to return the throttle. It must be under the cover on the governor, because when I push my weighted arm it returns on it's own and I can't see any external springs.

The slotted arm from the governor should NOT disengage from the weighted arm. I didn't take the cover off of mine to see if there is a stop in there or the spring may stop it, I'm not sure how that works.

You're missing the rod from the choke lever to the starter. When the starter engages it pulls the choke shut and when the engine starts to run the starter drops back and unchokes it's self. The pictures of mine might help you some.

"DELCO DON" Southern Illinois
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Old 07-16-2005, 12:50:46 AM
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Ray Cardoza Ray Cardoza is offline
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Default Re: making molds for casting parts

Good to see the site is once again available to view. Lookin at the delco right now. Time at my house is now 9:36 pm. I hope Dennis the (menace) doesnt find his way to Georgia a friend of mine is down here and I dont want her to have come home with nothing there upon her arrival
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Old 07-16-2005, 01:14:13 AM
BobRR BobRR is offline
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Default Re: making molds for casting parts

This is interesting as I thought the old Kohlers were the only ones with the auto start how many other old gen. had this feature? Thanks BobRR
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Old 07-16-2005, 04:00:18 AM
Josh Miller
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Default Re: making molds for casting parts

There are so many different ways to make molds, I have found in the foundry I work at an easy way is silica, yes bad for you but you can use protection to stop it. You can carve fused silica with a dremel tool after machining it to get the old lines look. This is a cheep way and can be used many times. We poor stainless steel at 3050 degrees and can use them over and over. down fall is you need to pre heat and let cool naturally.

I get a magizine at work with hundreds of suppliers for molding products. If you want you could e-mail me and I can send you the adress to get a free magizine and explore more about molding. There are lots of website adresses in the back of it that even give you ideas how to mold.

Josh M.
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Old 07-16-2005, 10:27:42 AM
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Elden DuRand Elden DuRand is offline
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Thumbs up Re: making molds for casting parts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Don C. Wiley
Elden;

Mine doesn't have a torsion spring to return the throttle. It must be under the cover on the governor, because when I push my weighted arm it returns on it's own and I can't see any external springs. ..........
Don:

Everybody says you're a real prince of a guy and I've got to agree!

I've taken the liberty of copying out the photos of the governor linkage and am saving them to use to get this one set-up.

If you'll look on your carb casting above where the throttle shaft comes out, there's a threaded hole. Yours doesn't appear to have anything mounted to it either. ???!! I saw where, on the inside of the governor cover, there was a projection (the rivet end of it is seen on the outside) and wondered what it was for. I guess that's to hold a compression spring between the arm and the cover that holds the arm against the governor button. When I get back to "Hurricane Alley" I'll take the cover off and see if I can fit a relatively weak spring in there.

Do you have any idea what the two screws on top of the governor housing are for as well as the two holes in the governor rod a couple of inches above the housing? It looks like something was mounted there. I can imagine a spring pad on the housing and a bracket mounted to the arm with a compression spring between. That would have done the same thing as the internal spring. Hmmmmmmmm??!

Also, I note that your engine has a different breather than mine. It's interesting to see the changes that manufacturers made during production. Also, to wonder why they did some of the things they did.

Again, thanks and take care - Elden
http://home.cybertron.com/~edurand

The 750 I'm working on does have all the starter and choke stuff but, at this time, I'm concentrating on getting the engine running so will leave it off and hope I can start it by pulling it over by the flywheel.

Last edited by Elden DuRand; 07-16-2005 at 10:33:55 AM. Reason: Didn't proof read. Didn't make sure I hadn't left some out.
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