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1/2 65 steamer

jbott82

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What gears do you guys use on your engines? Or do you make your own gears.:shrug:

Also I found a casting set and I didn't notice the lower cannon bering. Just the upper one. Is this common? Do I need to have one made? or is there an alternative Like the gears?:shrug:
 

jefftd

Registered
jbott, I am also in the fledgling stage of 1/2 scale 65. Some have used gears from either farmall F30 or Massey Harris 55. I am still on the look out for gearing. I located a couple out in midwest but have not moved on anything yet. Jeff
 

GYoung

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Last Subscription Date
11/04/2018
jbott, another fledgling here. I have to agree with jeff that the gears can come from either a Farmall F30 or Massey Harris 55 and it seems that the midwest is the place to find the parts. Concerning the Lower Cannon Bearing, it isn't normally included in a casting set since it is just a piece of pipe with no fancy add ons like a step as on the upper bearing.
I've gathered all the gears and steel wheels for my engine. All I have left to do is have a certified boiler made and obtain the casting set for the Case 65. Will probably order the casting set soon since I'm not quite sure how much machining is necessary on the castings.

I am just finishing up a 2" scale Case 65. That was to get my feet wet on nomenclature and what might be considered stumbling blocks during the construction stages. I've learned quite a lot from assembling and machining the 2" scale Case. Would recommend anyone else traveling the DIY route without previous experience to build a scale model and understand it isn't just a overnight project but one which will probably take many months. Just building my model has nearly taken six months.
Maybe we can swap notes down the line. Keep in touch, good luck, and maintain patience. Gene
 

butch vollmar

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jbott! If I'm not mistaken Turning used John Deere gears. Maybe John Deck will chime in here. John used to work for Turning. BV
 

GYoung

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Last Subscription Date
11/04/2018
BV,
You got my attention about using John Deere gears. Tried to find the John Deck you referred to, but didn't get very far. Would you or someone else have any other leeds for a list of those JD gears used for a 1/2 scale Case 65?
Gene
 

jefftd

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I know that some that have used a bull and pinion out of a John Deere "A" for the intermidiate gear and gear on the crank. I have heard that differential from John Deer's have been used but not sure which model. Hardest items for me to locate and secure is the bull and pinions for the wheels.
 

John Deck

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Last Subscription Date
02/10/2017
Will post a list of gears as soon as I get home. They are Massey 55 and John Deer A gears. Please be aware that the currently available casting sets are not a true 1/2 scale 65 and I have head of several people having issues with setting them up to machine the engine bed. Feel free to email me at johndeck@att.net will try to help.
 

GYoung

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Last Subscription Date
11/04/2018
Jeff,
Give the Nebraskacowman.com a try for your gears. He has a lot more stuff than is on his web site. I've delt with him and find him very helpful, friendly, and fair priced. Shipping is the biggest overhead factor here.
Gene
 

jefftd

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Gene, Thanks for the information. I appreciate any leads. How did you make the axle's for your wheels. Did you swedge the ends or did you weld the ends into the rims? I am moving forward slowly.
 

chrsbrbnk

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on the 1/3 case the book calls for swaged spokes if you weld them its really hard to get good concentricity I used the weld approach on the water wagon wheels I had to use spacers from the hub to rim while welding to get any kindof roundness
 

GYoung

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Last Subscription Date
11/04/2018
Jeff,
I swedged the spokes using a piece of bar stock with a thru hole just larger than the spoke diameter, and a drilled recess at one end the same as the recess in the rim. An end of a spoke was heated red hot the cold end dropped down into the thru hole which left about 3/16" still exposed, then hammered that end into the recess forming the swedge. The other end was threaded after removing it from the bar stock. Loosely threaded all spokes thru the rim into the hub then trued the wheel like truing a bicycle wheel. The bar stock was held up above a piece of plate via 3 tacked on legs. After the end was swedged the bar stock was picked up turned over and the spoke tapped out of the bar stock. Actually the spoke almost falls out by itself. The longest part of the task is the threading and I even did that with the help of the lathe.
 

Jeff Smith

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Last Subscription Date
08/05/2018
I had my bull gears made for my 1/2 scale 65 hp Case that was operating by 2009. I say operating because it still needs painted and a lot of detail work like "Frivits", the back step, bunker doors, etc. I bought the last set of castings from the company that bought the patterns and castings from Ternings. The man made a pattern and had them cast and then machined the teeth on them to mate to a Boston Gear. I had to have it made because the company that bought Ternings stuff used all of the sets that Ternings had. The man that made them has since passed and everything has been sold off including the machines he made them with.

I would like to let you know that if you have your own shop you are looking at about $30K to build a new engine yourself with a code boiler. If you have to pay for items to be machined you are looking at around $65-85K with a code boiler. Please don't ask my wife how I know....:O

:wave:
 

LAKnox

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Age
62
Last Subscription Date
01/15/2016
I had my bull gears made for my 1/2 scale 65 hp Case that was operating by 2009. I say operating because it still needs painted and a lot of detail work like "Frivits", the back step, bunker doors, etc. I bought the last set of castings from the company that bought the patterns and castings from Ternings. The man made a pattern and had them cast and then machined the teeth on them to mate to a Boston Gear. I had to have it made because the company that bought Ternings stuff used all of the sets that Ternings had. The man that made them has since passed and everything has been sold off including the machines he made them with.

I would like to let you know that if you have your own shop you are looking at about $30K to build a new engine yourself with a code boiler. If you have to pay for items to be machined you are looking at around $65-85K with a code boiler. Please don't ask my wife how I know....:O

:wave:
Wow! You used an expensive shop to do the machine work. I talked to Lloyd Creed, who had Case castings, and he gave me a contact to a guy who'd had one built using his castings. I talked to the customer and he said they had about 100 hours of professional work into it. Their cost, including a code boiler, was just over $30k. This was about 4-5 years ago. I talked to a local machine shop here in AZ after that, and got about the same answer. I do know that, at that time, some of the parts that needed to be made from scratch, were to have castings available shortly after our conversation, so several hours of the build time would probably be eliminated.

Lyle
 

jefftd

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Luckily I have a machinery & shop that I will not have to send anything out. I will get a code boiler made mainly due to the size. My biggest issue is the cost outlay for the boiler. I plug away alittle at time on all the other items.
 

Jeff Smith

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Last Subscription Date
08/05/2018
I talked to the customer and he said they had about 100 hours of professional work into it.

Lyle
I was just providing a reference point for what a new engine can cost if a person does not have the skills or a shop to perform the work.

If you take a retired machinist at $35.00 x 2,000 hours +/- = $70,000.00

Boiler = $8,500.00 +/-

Casting Kit = $6,500.00 +/- excluding shipping

Total = $85,000.00 +/-

I also did not include all of the extra steel costs, fastners, paint, etc.

If you have no skills or machines a new engine can add up quickly. That is why I suggest to others to purchase a used engine because those can be found for less, around $25k +/-.
 

chrsbrbnk

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I am a tool and die maker for like 35 years and I can tell you for certain there is a boat load more than 100 hrs in machining in a scale model the bull gears alone took well over 40 the cross head at least 40 they will charge for fixturing. just spoke tapping is good for 20 hrs and even then a pro machine shop will be roughly $100 an hr on low tech stuff. and to have an out side shop do it kinda depends on how good the prints are. one print error will double the time or better on a part.
 

Jeff Smith

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Last Subscription Date
08/05/2018
I think that finding a used engine is hard. if you know of one hit me up! :brows:
They are out there, and the people that know about them usually don't say anything because they usually want to buy it themself.

Our youngest is building birdhouses to try and buy his own engine.......but he has a long way to go before he has enough to buy an engine.:)

If he makes enough to get a casting kit we will machine it together in my home shop so he can learn to build his own the next time.;)
 

oldtractors

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Age
50
Last Subscription Date
12/22/2015
The part number on the intermediate gear of one Terning I looked at told me it was a bull gear from a styled A.
 

Jeff Smith

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Last Subscription Date
08/05/2018
Would there be an interest in machined and un-machined castings and kits for the old Steam Industries / Ternings castings for the ½ scale Case 65 hp? I believe that I can convince the owner of all of the patterns to consider selling casting kits if there is an interest.
 
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