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1/2 scale CASE gov. question

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Mark Ilg

Guest
Hi steam guys. I am building a 1/2 scale CASE like TOM TERNING used to build. Most of the heavy work is completed however one of many questions I have is how the backlash spring functions. What does it attach to or how does it assist in proper gov. action The main spring between the weights or balls I understand but the other smaller spring in front is attached to a ratchet gear. I AM PERPLEXED thanks MARK
 
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Ken Majeski

Guest
This spring just gives additional tension holding the valve open which is counteracted by the centrifugal force of the spinning balls. It is easily adjustable with the ratchet gear and will give a wider range of speeds. Also the sawyers lever is mounted on this shaft and can be used to hook a wire on and to throttle the engine down when turning logs ect. and the engine could be stopped in case the belt breaks. Some governors (pickering) don't have the long spring but use leaf springs which the balls are mounted on. They don't get any better than a Pickering.


Kens old engine page
 
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Paul Woodworth

Guest
Hi Ken, I looked up in the Gardner Governor records and Case Engines used Gardner Governors at first. Most operators nowdays can't get their speed set right on the governor. They overspeed them and they are at the top of their range. They need to be set in the middle of the range so when the load hits they have some reserve to open up. And the second thing, they don't oil them everyday. And if working several hours, they need to be oiled more often. PAUL
 
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Ken Majeski

Guest
Well Paul: It's fun to watch some guys adjust their governors. A lot of governor trouble is caused by a packing nut too tight or wear on the spool valve and rings. If wear is the problem the only way to fix it is to repair the worn parts, But they keep adjusting and changing pulley sizes and wonder why things don't work right. And yes I do see a lot of engines overspeeded to try and compensate for worn parts. All makes of governors will do a acceptable job if in good condition but I prefer Pickering....
 
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Allen

Guest
On engines with an idler/tensioner, the pawl on this part often (originally) also had a little pin sticking out. If the belt broke, then the idler arm dropped and hit the pin.... which then knocked the pawl out.... The spring unwound, and the governor valve closed, shutting the engine down.

How do I know? My 20th Century (undermounted twin) has its governor mounted horizontally between the cylinders, the governor belt runs off the crank disc on the left side. Because of the crosshead guide there wasn't much room for the idler arm to drop, so they made VERY touchy.... I've lost track of the numer of times that I've accidentally tripped it. They are a royal pain to reset too. you almost need three hands.
 
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