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1/2 scale Phoenix Log Hauler

cyberbadger

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Last Subscription Date
11/13/2013
Awesome thread! :D

I have a question of how they operated these snow log haulers bag in the day....

How did they keep the external boiler plumbing and valves from freezing at the end of the day?

Because it was for the logging industry I imagine that they might not always? end up somewhere were they could be put in a barn.

Was it just the thermal mass of the water in the boiler that kept everything warm enough till the next day? :confused:

-CB
 

tharper

Registered
CB,

The typical hauling season here in Maine ran from January into March or approx. 90 days. On most operations the Lombards were worked around the clock six days of the week. With the haul roads dependent on snow conditions it was vital to make best use of time when the hauling was good.

When there was down time they usually had a shed or garage to hold-up in. In fact the Lombard manual provided detailed plans for just such a shop.

This all leads into a good story.... though you will have to excuse me for mentioning gasoline powered Lombards on a steam forum.

Ed Lacroix used an extensive fleet of 10 ton gasoline powered Lombards which operated out of his churchill lake depot camp. During the day they would move long sled trains of pulpwood from the cuttings near Mesquacook Lake to be dumped on the ice at Churchill. Anyway, they had a new driver - a Mr. Fecteau. after a few days the scaler at the landing noticed that Mr. Fecteau only needed 3 hours to make a trip that others were taking 6 hours to complete. In addition, over at the boarding house, they would see Mr. Fecteau leave early in the morning and return late in the evening after a full day hauling. Then they would be amazed to see him head right back out the door again to work the night shift!

It took them awhile to figure out that there were two Mr. Fecteau's and that they were identical twins.
 

Marv in Minn

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/05/2020
Hello Marv & Peter,
(clip)
To add to the confusion Lombard also produced a smaller log hauler with a vertical boiler and narrow lags. This are often mistaken as "early" or "the first" Lombard when in reality they were produced concurrent to the 20 ton machines and were an attempt to produce a lighter, cheaper log hauler in an effort to increase Lombard's market.

Terry Harper
Terry,
is this the vertical boiler Lombard you are talking about?

marv
 

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tharper

Registered
Hello Marv,

Yes it is. So far we have identified at least four different vertical boiler Lombards. Note the narrow (12") tracks. again he was looking to broaden his market by offering a smaller cheaper log hauler weighing about 15 tons. How many were actually built we have no idea - but we do know they were offered concurrently (for a period) with the standard 20 ton and are not "the first" Lombard as some have suggested.

Best regards,

Terry
 

loggah

Registered
Terry and Marv,
Heres a picture of one of Lawrence,Newhall,and Pages three experimental lombard log haulers operating,its one of the ones built by Waterville iron works and they were tried out from 1901-1903. This machine is identical to the one,or could be the one Terry posted the picture of being built in the Waterville iron works shop. In this picture you can also see the governor assembly ,but it doesn't have a belt on it to be operable,for the life of me i have never figured out where the belt could be run from. If they had it belted up it would require a bunch of idler pulleys to support belt routing. Marv,again great job on a 1/2 scale gigantic project. at least the one i worked on we didn't have to make "ALL" the parts. Don

 

Marv in Minn

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/05/2020
Terry and Marv,
Heres a picture of one of Lawrence,Newhall,and Pages three experimental lombard log haulers operating,
(clip)
]
it looks like this was one that was steered by a team of horses, i see no steering system.
thanks, marv in minn
 

3/4 ADVANCE

Registered
Last Subscription Date
12/08/2013
Hi Marv; Lookin' fantastic! Did you have any luck finding a small dynamo? Do any of the larger scale locomotive suppliers have anything, or do you think you may have to dummy one up and go with battery power? Keep the wonderful progress reports coming. Are you going to have some wood cut at the model show for you to make a couple of wood haulers out of next winter? They should be a piece of cake after the project you did this winter. All for now, :wave: 3/4 A
 

Marv in Minn

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/05/2020
Hi Marv; Lookin' fantastic! Did you have any luck finding a small dynamo? Do any of the larger scale locomotive suppliers have anything, or do you think you may have to dummy one up and go with battery power? Keep the wonderful progress reports coming. Are you going to have some wood cut at the model show for you to make a couple of wood haulers out of next winter? They should be a piece of cake after the project you did this winter. All for now, :wave: 3/4 A
i have a feeling i'll have to go with a battery.:O

my Grandfather ran logging camps on the Minnesota/Wisconsin border in the early 1900's so my Dad grew up in the woods and worked building the ice roads for the long haul sleighs.
we always cut pulp wood for the mills in Cloquet when i was growing up using horses and sleigh so i have a lifetime interest in logging.
i still have my Dad's regular logging sleigh which is 1/2 size of the long haul sleighs seen in the pics. The regular sleigh runners are the same width as the tracks of a team of horses with 5' bunks whereas the long haul sleighs are much wider with 10' bunks.
i plan on making a small wheeled frame for the regular sleigh to pull behind the 1/2 scale Phoenix in the summer. if i need any thing sawed, Anderson's Rock Creek Relics,Rush City, Mn, our local show, runs a sawmill year around.
marv in minn
 

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bill chasser

Registered
marv beautiful pic of the team n the snow road! Great job on the Phoenix also look forward to seeing videos when you team up

From an old cat skinner who aint no beginner!!
 

tr nelson

Registered
Hi Marv,
Good job on the Phoenix Log Hauler. Son told me about it after he talked to you on the phone the other day so figured I would check it out. Have to get down there and check it out some time.
Ted in North Pine County
 

Marv in Minn

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/05/2020
i brought home the oak cab panels today.
(the cabinet maker made our kitchen cabinets in 1976
and is still working slowly with a bad heart)
i know the original Phoenix were painted solid black
but i can't bring myself to cover the oak grain with paint.
now for stain and spar varnish.
the cab is about 3'x3'x3'. i will make the back half of the roof
removable so we can get in to run it :O
marv
 

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Marv in Minn

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
02/05/2020
first fire today at Lund Machine :D
we took it to 110#'s and both 1/2" injectors picked up at 70 :)

i also ran the engines, looks like i had them all timed correctly. :cool:
i did not have the final drives hooked up, next time.
it's back home to get the cab mounted
marv
 

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