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1/3 Case 65hp Steam Traction Model

Johann1

Registered
Thank you for the advice B7100 I will take that into consideration.

I was taking a look at the engine today to remember what was done with it. The clutch mechanism is pretty far build the only thing left to be built on it is the shoes-arms to grip onto the Belt Drive. The eccentric to run the D-Valve is completed and so is part of the linkage for it. Then the engine frame itself is done so is the flywheel. The one problem with the engine frame though is that it is slightly crooked so that would need to be straightened. For the most part the original owner did a great job especially for what tools he had which were hand crank drills, angle grinders-chop saws, a torch, and later on a welder. So asking all of you should I just completely start the engine from scratch or continue building it as is.

Thanks Johann
 

Big Bird

Registered
Last Subscription Date
02/16/2018
I would try to set it back in place to see if you can get it lined up first... then go from there...
If every thing line's up try to use what you have.
Otherwise drop some cash on a set of castings and start from scratch... It all depends on how much$$$ money you want to spend....
Spend the time or spend the dough....
But whatever you do.... keep on posting you progress.... :wave:
 

b7100

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
You might want to check the overall condition of the engine. How is the bore, bearings, slide valve and the like before making a decision. It takes a lot of machining and $$$ to start from scratch. Maybe salvage what you can from what you have. It's hard looking at the pictures to see what may be useable. To invest a lot in castings to have a nice engine on a marginal boiler might not be the best option.
 

Johann1

Registered
Im not quite sure weather I want to spend a whole load of money on castings yet, or that I should continue current production on it. If I did buy castings though it would be like what you said a nice engine on a marginal boiler which I agree isn't the best option.

But by any means I don't have intentions for this to be a complete 100% replica though, but I would like it to resemble-look like a average 1/3 Case steam tractor and not a 10 minute cobble together.

Thanks Johann
 

Johann1

Registered
I Just got back from the Forest City Threshing show and while I was their I was taking a look at the Case steam engine their and how the reversing gear works for the eccentric. It appears that all that changes the timing is a block that is on a pivot with a groove in it for the eccentric to run in then when they pull a lever it pivots that block and the engine runs in a different direction.

Which led me to take a look at my engine and It appears the original builder had already started building a bracket for the Reversing Gear. All that needs done is to make that pivot block for the reversing gear.

Thanks Johann
 

b7100

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
You are correct in how the reversing mechanism works. The location of the pivot point of that block is very important in getting the correct timing. It needs to be exactly straight up from the krankshaft and at a height so that you have equal travel of the valve in both directions. Do some studying on valve adjustment.
 

Johann1

Registered
Hey everybody I have just got back from Rollag today and it was great. While I was their I was taking notes on other model Case steam engines and I noticed what stuff still needs done on mine. One question I have is that the clamps on my engine that are holding down the crank shaft are just steel on cast iron so I will probably need to redo those clamps on my engine and put bronze-brass in them. But then when I got to the part on deciding lubrication for those clamps I was thinking couldn't I just use that little oil with with a cap on it and put a grease fitting in their instead?

Thanks Johann
 

b7100

Subscriber
Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
I'm not sure what is meant by clamps. On my 3d scale Case the crank runs on babbit bearings. The crosshead and rod bearings are bronze (not brass). Cast iron on steel is OK for slow turning parts (like wheels). Any bearings need to be fitted. Babbit needs to be scraped. Bronze and cast iron need to be lapped in. Use only time saver lapping compound. Regular (like valve grinding compound ) might seize or embed causing damage. Any shaft turned in a lathe or bearing bored will not be perfectly round. Lapping a bearing in with time saver lapping compound will make a perfect fit with just enough clearance for oil. Wheels with cast iron on steel will turn like ball bearings. If you want a more maintenence free less authentic engine use ball bearings. They too need to have the right fit to prevent either spinning or overheating. I chose oil over grease for lube only because it is less messy. My oil/grease cups have either 1/4" 28 or 1/8" pipe threads so I can swap them out for grease zerts if I need to. Time saver is availiable in different grits. Yellow is for bronze/babbit. Green is for cast iron/steel. It breaks down and will not embed in the metal.
 

Johann1

Registered
Hi Everyone, sorry that I haven't been posting on Smokstak lately I have just been busy, but that doesn't mean I haven't been working on the Case Tractor. Just to clear up on some confusion on what I meant by crankshaft clamps is that I am talking about the Babbitt bearings on the crankshaft that secure the crankshaft to the engine. Something that I have that I have noted is that it is not Cast iron on Steel for the shaft and bearings, but instead it is just steel on steel. So I am currently not quite sure to do on that. Another thing that I have been working on is the cylinder for the piston and, I have found a piece of metal that should work.

Some other news is that I picked up a 1/4 scale case engine with no boiler in later September of this year. The 1/4 scale engine was built by the same person who built the 1/3 Case Steam Engine that I am currently working on, and it has been a big improvement in the designing process because, even with a set of blueprints it is nice to have another engine to take notes off of. Also just to let all of you know I will now be able to keep more tabs on Smokstak because, a lot of my school activities are over for the year.

Thanks to all-Johann
 
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Johann1

Registered
Hi, everybody, I apologize for not being able to post anything for the past 5 months on Smokstack, but I do have some news. To begin with, it has been a tad bit difficult keeping up with posting my progress on my scale model Case here on Smokstack. Due to school pre Quarantine, and during Quarantine including a countless number of things that have been happening I have not been able to post any of the progress of my engine. With E-Learning going on right now time is not quite on my side but luckily school will be out of session in a couple of weeks so I will have more free time to be working on my engine and keeping all of you up to date on what is going on. I have had a lot of stuff happen within these past 5 months that pertain to the Engine which I will probably post about within a day or two. There are a lot more things that I could say right now but I would like to keep this update short because it is starting to get late, but I will be posting a lot more very soon.

Sorry for all the troubles and wait-Johann
 

Johann1

Registered
Hey everybody (just to let you all know this update is going to be pretty short). So over the past couple of months, I have obtained both a milling machine and a metal turning lathe which has been a big bonus because I am now able to produce my own parts at home instead of having to drive 30 minutes to do any machining. Also, I have been doing a lot of 3d modeling lately for my 3d printer so that means that I can 3d print out parts for the Case so I can get a feel for what they look like in real life.

That's all for now-Johann
 

Kevin O. Pulver

Email NOT Working
Age
54
Last Subscription Date
02/14/2020
Hey everybody (just to let you all know this update is going to be pretty short). So over the past couple of months, I have obtained both a milling machine and a metal turning lathe which has been a big bonus because I am now able to produce my own parts at home instead of having to drive 30 minutes to do any machining. Also, I have been doing a lot of 3d modeling lately for my 3d printer so that means that I can 3d print out parts for the Case so I can get a feel for what they look like in real life.

That's all for now-Johann
Johann, that's amazing to me that you were able to get your own milling machine and lathe at 14 years old!
I had a good friend Joe Dittrick, who is gone now who built a quarter scale case steam traction engine and a couple 1/6 scale.
He also built I think several dozen model hit miss engines including many Economies.

He allowed me to use his shop when I built a cylinder head and fuel mixer for my 12 horse Hercules champion in hit miss engine.

I think it's pretty awesome too that you have a couple of steam engine projects to work on. I don't know much about steam but it seems to me they are a lot more work to build than some of the gas engines.
I was just wondering if it would be a good idea for you to buy some inexpensive gas engine castings and you could probably complete a running engine project in no time- which would build your Machining skills and experience and also give you some quick satisfaction to encourage you to keep going. Either way thank you for sharing your progress with us

Oh yeah I also wanted to comment on your 3D printing capabilities. I think that is just awesome technology and awesome that you are able to be using that and learning about it.
 
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