• If you like antique engines, vintage tractors or old iron, please register and join us. When you register on Smokstak, give complete answers and fill in all blanks. IF YOU ARE ON WIRELESS. GIVE YOUR CITY AND STATE! NO ZIPCODES! We get hundreds of applications, so there is no time to deal with missing information.

1/3 Scale CASE 65

Case Place

Subscriber
Age
74
Last Subscription Date
07/14/2019
Well today is a RED letter day for the DuFour family. Suzie's email says it all.

Today is the big day, he is finally coming home! He has to do his morning stuff, meet with the doc one more time, and wait to talk to_one other person and then he will head to the house. It has been a very long 9 weeks but seeing how far he has come in that time period just proves what kind of person Jason is. He is persistent, strong minded, determined, and very very thankful for everything that has been given to him. He is thankful for the treatment he has received at WakeMed, the majority of the staff has been more than wonderful. He is thankful for the support of everyone around him, he thanks me everyday for my help and anyone else that helps him. He is also thankful for what he still has, the ability to move his upper body and everyday he gets around a little better, the fact that broken bones are healing so he can get around better, his brain was not damaged (which was sometimes questionable before the accident, jk), and he is still alive. Ever since he has been aware of what happened he has said that he is thankful to be alive, and I am very thankful that I still have him. Our lives have definitely changed but I look forward to the future.
Okay enough of the sappy stuff, once we get home we are going to sit on the couch and relax! No speaker above his head looking for a nurse that is hiding, no intercom in the hall announcing a trauma arriving at the hospital, no cleaning lady banging around the room with a mop, just a movie and maybe a nap. But there will not be too much rest, he starts outpatient therapy on Monday. We are going to the WakeMed rehab on Wake Forest Rd. in Raleigh 3 times a week. So if you want to come by next week call first to make sure we will even be home, I'm sure the doctors appointments will start next week too. And if you stop by and see a sign on the door, we are either sleeping or doing his daily routine so just leave a note and we will call you later.
Well, I am going to go finish a couple more things around the house before I go get him. We look forward to talking to everyone and thank you all again for all of your support.
_
Suzie and Jason

Thank to one and all for helping to make it happen so soon.
 

Case Place

Subscriber
Age
74
Last Subscription Date
07/14/2019
Karen and I had the chance to go to a small local show at Silk Hope, NC. We were able to do some serious learning on how to fire the 1/3 scale CASE in conjunction with the 1/4 scale sawmill. At an earlier show I was able to determine that the drive pulleys on the jack shaft of the sawmill were going to have to be changed. The sawmill mill was running way to fast. So that modification was made. While at Silk Hope we played around with the governor and I actually made a trip back home to do some minor machining. The efforts went in the right direction. I feel that the spring between the fly balls needs to be fine tuned yet. What we worked with was a 6-8 pound spring. I now have a 8-10 pound spring between the fly ball mounting points. The engine has been lagging behind the load before the governor comes on. Hopefully with the heavier spring this will correct the lag time between load and when the governor comes on. Anyway, we had a grand time. The weather was great and we made a lot of useless boards and plenty of saw dust. I have published a short 2 minute video clip on you-tube for your viewing pleasure.
The link is: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VKKwFNkYwRc
Salute: Larry:wave:

 

Case Place

Subscriber
Age
74
Last Subscription Date
07/14/2019
Thanks Dick, one of the most recent improvements to the mill was elevating the whole rig up about 6". It made it a whole lot more comfortable to use. In the past I was stooping over a little bit to operate the mill. By days end my back was killing me and I could hardly stand up straight. The new modification worked out great. The speed seems to be just right. I have changed the pulley at the post for the saw dust drag chain so hopefully it will not hang up anymore like it did at the end of the video clip that you viewed. I am going to try a 12" diameter rip blade this coming weekend at the Rockville-Centerville, VA show to see what happens. I have a feeling that I will be going right back to my 10" 12 tooth thin kerf blade. They have serviced me very well.

The log I was cutting on was from a dogwood tree that was next to my son Jason's house. We had to cut it down to make room for the new handicap bathroom. I am cutting the logs up and will let them dry out and then make something special for the kids from the wood.

That fever you have, I am sure will be cured very soon. You sawmill looks great ! I wish we could be at Forrest City to see and hear it in person. You should have many years of pleasure from it. Be safe in all that you do my friend. Salute: Larry:wave:
 

Case Place

Subscriber
Age
74
Last Subscription Date
07/14/2019
After a very turbulent summer, things have finally settled down and somewhat back on track again. Karen and I have been able to go to 4 different steam and tractor shows this fall with the new CASE. We had to cut the first 3 shows short with operating the CASE because of mechanical problems, mostly involving the governor and once with the differential. The last show at Western North Carolina Ag center was a huge success for us. We sawed and sawed and sawed some more. I finally got the right spring combination on the governor and it responds like a champ. Now I have a wood shop full of wild cherry wood. With the last log of the weekend, I changed out to a 12" diameter rip blade. I sure wish I had tried it earlier. The CASE hongered down and went to town with the new blade. Boy was it fun. The big thing, the 12" blade does not "sing" like the 10" blade did. We hear more of the engine working instead. A real delight to our ears.

The attached pictures are from the Yadkinville, NC show. This was a first time show for the folks and they had a great turn out. There was over 125 tractors and many other pieces of old iron. When we walked down the rows of tractors you could smell all the fresh paint. There was also an excitement in the air that we had not experienced before. Sorry to say, we were the only ones with steam and sawmill. A gentlemen went back home to bring me a couple of cedar logs he has had for several years to cut up for him. He was so glad that I could do this for him. He wants to make some items for family members for Christmas gifts.

Hopefully my friends, I can get back to some more construction articles on the 1/3 CASE in the upcoming months. I have several in rough draft with pictures. Have a great Thanksgiving. Salute, Larry:wave:
 

Attachments

Case Place

Subscriber
Age
74
Last Subscription Date
07/14/2019
Been working on the sawmill and getting it ready for the up coming season. Our first show is March 20 & 21. The carriage was totally dismantled, cleaned and oiled. Doing so allowed me to paint the ledger wheel components I made many moons ago. For you sawyers, I do have a question. The graduations on a ledger wheel/board, do they represent the thickness of the piece that is being cut off or what the thickness is of the piece that is still left on the carriage:shrug: The ledger wheel that I have was modeled after a set-up that is on the sawmill at the Silk Hope, NC facilities. There is a nice brass band going around the perimeter of the wheel with lots of numbers on it. I failed to ask the fellows what it was all about when I took my pictures.:bonk: Thanks for the help. Salute, Larry:wave:
 

Attachments

Case Place

Subscriber
Age
74
Last Subscription Date
07/14/2019
After working on the carriage, I moved on to hopefully improving the saw dust drag chain. I had been using the typical bicycle chain, but it tends to get loaded up to much with the sawdust and the chain has to be kept in perfect alignment with the idler pulley hanging on the out rigger post. The speed of the chain was a little too slow and the flat belt was too slack. So I mounted a jack shaft under the husk frame with "V" belt sheaves. This will give me the opportunity to adjust the chain speed as needed. I still have a flat belt from the jack shaft to the worm gear drive for the chain drive sprocket. Then I have gone to a #35 square link detachable chain. I welded a small piece of steel to every 6th link to act as a paddle to drag sawdust from under the saw. My son Jason was so thrilled that he could furnish me with the drive and idler sprockets for the square chain. Ever since I built the mill, I have incorporated a 45 pound flywheel on the mandrel jack shaft. There was a long discussion about the pros and cons of a flywheel associated with a sawmill on "Bakermaker" 1/2 scale sawmill thread. It only stands to reason to eliminate the flywheel. So my sawmill is now 45 pounds lighter.
 

Attachments

Case Place

Subscriber
Age
74
Last Subscription Date
07/14/2019
Sorry to have hijacked my own thread for my sawmill, but I figure my 1/3 CASE and sawmill kind of go hand in hand. I have finished the taper attachments for the sawmill. I had 4 brackets cut out of 1/8" thick CRS by wire EDM. KAM Tool & Die did an awesome job. The first picture shows the brackets mounted on a gauge pin for a pivot point to mill the slots in the bracket for the lever lock mechanism. The lever is not exactly prototypical, but very functional and easy to get to. This is an addition I have been wanting to make for a long time. No more wood wedges. :brows: Salute, Larry:wave:
 

Attachments

Case Place

Subscriber
Age
74
Last Subscription Date
07/14/2019
My chief engineer and I had a chance to run the CASE and sawmill a few weekends ago at a show in Lake Waccamaw, NC. This was their second show and had a great turnout. The new taper attachments on the sawmill worked out great as well as the new saw dust drag chain. The big issue was the flywheel on the jack shaft. I had been running a 40 pound flywheel ever since I built the mill 8 years ago. There was a very intense discussion on Bakermaker's thread about the pros and cons of a flywheel associated with a sawmill. So I decided to remove my flywheel and see what the difference might be. While I was assembling the mill at the show, several sawyers came over to check things out. I told them that I was not to sure about the performance of the mill without the flywheel. They said it would probably not run as well without the flywheel. Boy, were they ever right. The governor would not begin to react quick enough to the load no matter how I adjusted it. So they helped me disassemble the jackshaft and replace the flywheel. What a difference ! There was very little slow down on the mandrel speed before the governor did its magic. The two sawyers that helped me said they have always had a flywheel of some sorts on their mills to help keep the mandrel speed at a more constant rpm. So I am a happy amateur sawyer again !:wave: Larry
 

OTTO-Sawyer

Subscriber
Age
57
Last Subscription Date
07/15/2019
Wish I would have found this thread a long time ago as I would have been clicking the thanks button on every post with pictures and on post #13 by BakerMaker.

Beautiful looking Engine And Mill, and great pictures of the build up.

Running a sawmill myself for 11 years after working the other end for 25 years, I'm somewhat surprised by the flywheel effect though. I would have figured that all the extra flywheel would do is delay the eventual reaction of the governor, simply allowing it get a little farther into the cut before reacting. Only problems I have had that would relate in any way to that is that for years and years, (20+... maybe many more+++) we always tried to run smaller logs when we had Port Hurons on the mill because the ones we had at our show always seemed to be severly underpowered and we always had to feather the feed on the mill to let them catch up. Advance Rumely would walk right through pretty much anything we threw at it. Last year I had to replace the drive gear on the carraige feed and went 1 tooth bigger which makes the carraige feed a little faster. First Engine they sent down to me last year was the smaller Port, and I still had a BIG log on the deck from the year before. I was afraid I was going to have to feather the feed that much more even on smaller logs, and probably change engines when I rolled the big one on, but was pleasantly surprised to find that I could actually lay into it and feed as hard as I wanted to on it. Turned out the Port Hurons, at least the 3 of them that we regularly have on hand, have a real 'flighty' governor that tends to speed up and slow down repeatedly bouncing back and forth. The heavier cut with the faster carraige feed made the governor kick in and stay there showing me they had enough power to drag the belt on the ground and keep on going strong. The only thing I can see that the extra flywheel weight would be doing for you (or any sawmill) is compensating for an erratic governor, but I guess if it works for you, stick with it. Maybe the smaller lighter blade needs a little extra weight ???

A good governor is very important, especially on a sawmill !

Beth should be happy that I have 'new found respect' for Port Hurons after decades of thinking that they were "pretty, but underpowered":O;):wave:

And in answer to your earlier question about the markings on the ledger wheel, without seeing a picture of what you have or what you based it on, I'm going to say that it should be the width of each board, with a seperate scale on the slides showing the remaining cant (squared up log) width. Your wheel may or may not be scaled to allow for the blade width on each cut ??? The scale on the slides shows actual remaining width and you need to add the blade width for each cut to get down to what you want to end up at.
 
Top