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1/3 Scale Case Baler

b7100

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Last Subscription Date
07/10/2019
New thread. Only had to change 1 letter. Thought I would post some pictures of the build.
#1&2 measuring center distance of gears. Larger gear is pivoted on a stud which has the spindle centered on. Then the smaller gear is mounted on an arbor. The table is then moved over till the gears mesh. Then I can get the distance from the dro. There are other ways to measure but I think this is the best way for me considering my mentality. The bushing has an offset lip that fits in the bearing plate. That way I can tweak the gears a little if necessary to get a proper mesh. One of the larger bull gears was a little larger than the other making it a little tight. I hope I can run it in with a little lapping compound. A special thanks to Larry T for his contribution.
 

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OTTO-Sawyer

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57
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07/15/2019
Just imagine how much fun it would be to get THESE Egg-Shaped Gears to mesh. . .



I have my Grandfathers old Sandwich Hay Press which is identical to the one in the video (which is at Sycamore IL) and hope to get it belted up to my Dad's old 5hp Monitor engine and shoot some video of them next year to merge together with a 1969 Home Movie of them being used on Grandpa's Farm the year before Dad formed the Stephenson County Antique Engine Club.

:salute:
 

b7100

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07/10/2019
(THAT) would be a challenge. I watching it appears that the gear ratio changes as the plunger goes through its cycle. As the plunger advances it gears itself down (for more power). Then when it pulls back it speeds up. Kind of like a wood splitter with the variable displacement pump. Its facinating to watch it. Lots of respect for the genious that came uo with that.
 

OTTO-Sawyer

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07/15/2019
Here's a shot out of my 1914 American Machinists' Handbook on the elliptical or eccentric gears on the Sandwich Hay Press, indicating that they were also used on printing presses among other things.

While the principal is easy to understand, it's got to be a nightmare laying out the pattern for them.

:salute:
 

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chrsbrbnk

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there's a well pump that uses a variable gear ration with a slightly different approach where the gear contact line moves back and forth horizontally the teeth in contact sort of jump from pitch to pitch. its purpose was to achieve linear piston speed there by not having to accelerate the water flow and slow it down at various points in the stroke since the piston is barely moving a TDC with a normal crank action
 

OTTO-Sawyer

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57
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07/15/2019
there's a well pump that uses a variable gear ratio with a slightly different approach where the gear contact line moves back and forth horizontally the teeth in contact sort of jump from pitch to pitch.
I assume you're referring to this . . .



:salute:
 
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OTTO-Sawyer

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57
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07/15/2019
Sorry for high jacking your thread. . .

Looking Forward to seeing your baler build-up.

:salute:
 

b7100

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07/10/2019
Kind of looks like a wood spliter. Main gear was an inch bigger in diameter than print causing interferice with plunger. I had to trim 3/4" from the skirt to clear the gear. Also the pulley I am using is smaller in diameter. This raised concern about the gearing. In watching the utube videos it looked like they were running from 15 to 26 strokes/minute. I came up with gear ratios for 27 strokes/minute @ 300 rpm.thinking that I can throttte it back. Gears were a little tight so I turned it over by hand with some coarse lapping compound. It loosened up constderably. When it gets under power I'm sure they will run in.
Otto I enjoyed your videos. Always like to see unusual stuff.
 

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chrsbrbnk

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I'm guessing you won't run at 300 rpm I tend to run about 100 to maybe 150 keep in mind even at those rpm you be flying around like a maniac tying wires shuffling hay around and trying not get your hands crushed or removed these things are fairly dangerous go thru a couple pusher sticks a show
 

b7100

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07/10/2019
I was told that before. 300 is what the governor is set at. Watching the videos 27 strokes/min is the fastest I have seen them run. So I have that potential. I expect to idle it down to a manageable level. I can always change pulleys. At this point I am trying to make an informed guess. What did you come up with for looping your wire? And what is the market price for 3d scale hay/straw these days?
 

Big Bird

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02/16/2018
I've heard tell, that a bale sells for 4 to 5 bucks a wack....at least around Halloween... :wave:
 

b7100

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07/10/2019
I read that 8 bales/hr. is the norm. If I figured right at about 50,000 bales this hobby will have broke even if you don't figure any labor. We used to bale from 25 to 30,000 (full size) bales/year when I was kid. Couple of years I'll be out of the red.
 

chrsbrbnk

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there's a roll of bailing wire on a square tube spindle to match the wire rolls with a 16gage disc on either side to prevent tangles this is free to spin on a bolt going thru a 1x1 sq tube about 3-4 ft long there is a spring loaded friction washer bearing against the top disc the wire feeds thru a couple of spring loaded steel straps wing nuts on all of these for adjusting spring tension. then feeds to the far end where there is a hand cranked shaft with a hook on it mounted in bronze bearings . make it so the hooks are replace able with a set screw comming in from the side of the shaft . so the procedure is thread the wire thru the straps with a line man plier, pulling it up to the hook and about an 1 inch past then bend it back around the hook in a u shape with the plier gripping across the hook give 3 -5 turns the use the side cutter on the pliers to clip the wire off to the right length ( to be determined by bale size) then repeat about jillion times. I'd send a pic but its out in the garage crammed in the back with the bailer. Ive been just giving the bales away or give them to the show to sell kids really love them people like them and the show is more rewarding for the people and usually the show supplies the straw some people will give you a couple bucks to recoupe wire cost other people will just try to grab as many as possible go figure.
 

Steve Kunz

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07/10/2019
I do about the same thing to make the wires. I have the roll of wire spin on a bolt, and I clamp it in the vise on my workbench. I have a mark on the bench for length, roll the wire out and cut them. Then I have a hook that I put in a cordless drill, wrap the end of the wire around the hook, hold it with pliers and give it a spin with the drill. It makes a nice tight loop. I always give the bales away, everyone loves them.
 

b7100

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07/10/2019
Some progress. Forming the board launcher took 3 tries including a change in tactics. I couldn't get an accurate job done on the press brake. I changed to a piece of channel milled to 1 5/16. Clamped the stock to it and used the heat and beat method. Ended up with a very uniform accurate formed part. Then the dog spring forming operation involved various pliers, hammers, vises. I used a spring with a 9/16 hole .081 diameter wire. The bracket was also formed on the channel iron using the heat and beat method,
 

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b7100

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07/10/2019
The print shows a (folder). It is vague on where and how it is mounted in front of the board dropper. I don't see a purpose for it. In looking at videos it look like some have left it out.
The way it looks on the print there isn't room for it to go in front of the board dopper. Anybody who has built one have any advise?
 

chrsbrbnk

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I actually scaled mine from my 1/6 scale prints and it didn't have one but if you'd take a pic of the print I'd be pretty curious . I believe it has some thing to do with not having shaggy bails not sure how it would interact with bad board drops there's not alot of room like you say.
 

b7100

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07/10/2019
I watched some more utube videos. The folder hangs straight down just behind where the board drops. It is spring loaded. As the plunger comes back the folder catches the top and holds the straw as the plunger moves forward. It looks like it eliminates the shaggy bale ends. I will have to cut the top of the bale chamber back to accomodate it. A few things on the prints I have are not very clear. Some of the dimensions are not legible. Sometimes you have to scale things and compare to known dimension. Other than that the design is very functional.
 
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